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Anyone get sore thumb joints riding bicycles?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ASATKat, Oct 22, 2020.

  1. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    I have had thumb joint paint from gripping with thumb wrapped around.

    The heal of the palm puts a lot of pressure on the wrapped around thumb.

    Being a guitar player this is very painful in my rt hand joint while using a pick.

    No doubt this is arthritis but it's the constant activity that pushes it. Biking is my only transportation by choice, to save my couch potato life.

    I recently bought a pair of vertical handle grips, waiting for the delivery. These will totally change my handlebar grip and relieve the pressure on the joint. I hope.

    Thoughts? Experiences? =)
     
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  2. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    A little numb there in thumbs.

    But, I am not a power rider. Only a few miles at a time.

    Mostly derrierre..
     
  3. Bortyeast

    Bortyeast Tele-Holic

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    Heavy feet, light hands. And try a pair of Deity Knuckledusters.
     
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  4. 68tele

    68tele Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I've been riding my whole life, but never had any pain like you are describing. Sounds like you are supporting a lot of your weight on your hands? Your bike might not be setup correctly - maybe need a more upright position. Bike may be too big/small for you, or you have odd handlebar setup, or any number of things.

    Pic of bike? Or better yet pic of you riding?
     
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  5. Zepfan

    Zepfan Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    I had a problem with the frontend on my motorcycle that caused a lot of pain from the hands up to my shoulder-blades.
    I tried different tires, handle bars, handlebar weights, sand in the bars, new grips and new bearings. It lessened the effects, but didn't get rid of it. Only way I finally got rid of it was to sell the bike.
     
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  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    CF807CCE-AE89-4F2E-9B91-F348B532150A.jpeg Yeah I guess it was my thumbs along with my wrists.
    Pretty good fix in the Ergon GP1 grips that take much of the pressure off the thumb area. Can be rotated on the bars to support the outer hand.
     
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  7. johnny7

    johnny7 Tele-Meister

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    I have to agree that your bike may not be set up properly. If you raise your handlebars, you will notice a difference.
     
  8. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    It's likely too much weight on the hands.

    It can be a result of saddle too high, saddle too far forward, saddle too far back, saddle angled down, bars too low, bars too far away. Weak core muscles.

    Lots of causes. Actual shape of the handlebar isn't that important. Stuff like the Ergon grips is just a band aid to cover up the problem. Solving the problem could very well be free.

    Raising the bars might not fix it either. When the saddle is right you'll be balanced and you won't need to hold yourself up with the bars.

    Most of us who ride a lot have our handlebars very low without problem, but the rest of the bike has to be adjusted ever more carefully.
     
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  9. BradKM

    BradKM Tele-Holic

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    Recently started riding a lot again and was getting numbness in my arms and hands (especially on the left, where I'd been having prior nerve issues.) A pair of vertical (Velo) grips helped a lot. With the standard mountain bike grips, I'd start to get numbness between 3 to 5 miles into a ride. Afterward, nothing until after 12 or so, depending on how hard I'm riding and how frequently I switch grips.
     
  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I changed my riding position a lot with age and damage, no more drop bars for me!
     
  11. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

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    Need to know more about your bars, how they're set, how you hold them and how you sit before anyone can make any sensible suggestion. It's fixable for sure though.
     
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  12. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Only when I hit a tree, rock or ride the wrong bike. Some things sexagenarians should maybe reconsider hurt more than my thumb.

    More seriously, I've been getting less problems like that by trying to keep at range of motion, stretching and general exercise.

    Also more seriously, what's the bike and setup. A pic? What @telemnemonics posted sort of worked on one commuter bike I had but caused other hand pain too. More modern drop and riser bars with simple grips helped me the most.
     
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  13. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's

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    Drop bars are often the least likely to cause these issues as you get like 5-6 different places you can put your hands to change up the stresses on your body. The main position on a flat bar causes you to have your wrist rotated almost all the way to one end of it's range of motion.. not the greatest thing to have for the whole ride.

    If you put bar ends on and rotate them forward (not up!) that is a more neutral position for your wrist.

    It's just the rest of the bike needs to be adjusted to fit correctly no matter what the bars look like.
     
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  14. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    I only have that pain when I ride wrong....but I do know what you are discussing.
     
  15. Cheap Trills

    Cheap Trills Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Some thoughts that may or not apply based on your situation --

    different seat / stem combination to get a posture which isn't putting much weight on the bars?
    softer frame material like steel if you happen to be riding aluminum or carbon?
    riding gloves? they actually make a difference.
    ergo grips that help shift the weight to the palms?
    put thumbs over bars instead of wrapping around?
    coaster brake incase it's the braking movement that's causing the issue?
     
  16. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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  17. SRHmusic

    SRHmusic Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    Yes, good. The old drop style handlebars still used on touring bikes have many available hand positions. That idea of switching things up every so often seems to be the key to avoid overuse of one position. That comment about too much weight on the hands and bike fit is good, too. Good luck!
     
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  18. Slim Chance

    Slim Chance Tele-Afflicted

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    Two words of advice: Core Strength.

    Assuming your bike is setup properly, you will get the most benefit of having a strong core to hold you up rather than placing all of you upper body weight on you arms.
     
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  19. 6String69

    6String69 Tele-Holic

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    I switched to a recumbent trike because of wrist and taint pain.
     
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  20. ASATKat

    ASATKat Friend of Leo's

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    I have 3 vertebre fused in my neck in an '89 surgery. This has limited my ability to fully extend my neck backwards. As a result a low posture with the handlebars on a bike means I'm looking at the ground. So my Huffy 27.5 cruiser has the handlebars up high and I get good rotation, not at all perfect, but good no pain rotation.

    I think it's my fate to have arthritis in that joint, but if the vertical grips work and relieve the pressure then I believe the joint discomfort will relax, how much? I don't know.

    What about nutrients to build back cartilage?
     
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