anyone ever tried this on fender headstocks?

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Marn99, Apr 18, 2020.

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  1. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    I've been wanting to find an alternative to the robosander for a while now, not only because it's slow but it isn't as accurate as a router bit and it can't get into tight spots like the bass side transition. Has anyone tried this method to do a fender peghead? If so, did it prevent tearout?
     
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  2. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    Never tried it and really never would. First a drill press is really not meant for lateral forces even though a number of people use them as a sander. Second, if you are concerned about tearout using a router, take really small passes and shallow depths. His statement in regards to being able to cut tighter radius with his method versus a router bit is just plain wrong.
    But as Marty would say, ymmv.
     
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  3. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    I should mention that I have access to a bridgeport milling machine, something that is made for lateral loads. the problem that I've encountered is that no matter how hard I try, when I go around end grain and the curves on the treble side, I get violent tearout. I always saw 1/32 inch to the pencil line.
     
  4. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    I could also invest in the whiteside ultimate flush trim router bit. It's a compression spiral bit and I've heard wondrous things from other luthiers about its performance on hard maple.
     
  5. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    @Marn99 your Bridgeport can't get close to the spindle speed to get a smooth cut. Speeds for Bridgeport heads generally top out at 4,200 RPM, with many running below that. Router speeds run from 12,000 to 31,000 RPM.

    To at least minimize the inevitable tear out you're getting, have you tried an end mill instead of a router bit?
     
  6. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    This is something I am aware of, and it's the reason I've wanted to get an overarm pin router for a while now. I was hoping to get a 50s or 60s Onsrud pin router using money I earned with a summer job, but those plans have obviously been put on ice given the situation worldwide at the moment. I've never thought about using an end mill, what would the advantages be?
     
  7. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    He makes it work but lateral forces on a drill press spindle seem like a bad ides, and I would worry about that bit flexing.

    He goes at it patiently and he seems to get good results though
     
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  8. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    If you're not already using a spiral router bit, the end mill has a spiral cutting edge that might be smoother cutting than a straight edged router bit.
     
  9. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    What type of robosander are you using? Doesn't it have smaller sleeves to be able to get in the tighter curves? And accuracy is really not something to worry about when talking about the headstock cutout especially when building vintage style fender necks. Variability between each neck was the norm. Close is good enough.
    How ever you decide to proceed, the whitesides spiral compression bit will serve you well. Most of the bits I use in my CNC are whiteside.
     
  10. Retrobob

    Retrobob Tele-Meister

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    Thanks! That was some really great info.
     
  11. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    That shaft does not need to be that long. You can see it flexing.

    What prevents a person from making a cutter like this with 1/4" drill rod and chucking it into a router in a router table?
     
  12. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    Drill bits / drill rod isn't really meant to be operated at the same speed as a router bit.
     
  13. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Holic

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    I have a 1 in. diameter robosander, which is the smallest size they have. There are two spots that it really cannot get, the transition to the headstock on the bass side, and the inside of the curve on the bottom of the headstock. I know what you're saying about variability, but still, it would be nice to rout out a blank that is accurate to my template.
     
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