Anyone else not fond of working on PCB amps?

Discussion in 'Amp Tech Center' started by dougstrum, Nov 29, 2017.

  1. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Down here we would say, 'Well, bless that PCB's heart'....
     
  2. OneHenry

    OneHenry Tele-Holic

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  3. JD0x0

    JD0x0 Poster Extraordinaire

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    If you think that's bad, you'd have a heart attack if you saw about 88% of the other PCB amps on the market.

    That amp has tons of room to work. Decent quality board. You can top solder components in and out in most cases, which means you don't even need to remove the board in a lot of cases. There are MUCH MUCH scarier PCB guitar amps than this, and they are common. This one isn't bad at all, by my standards.
     
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  4. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well, the five Noval sockets are mounted on the PCB, which is a very well made board. All of the front panel pots and the plastic input jack are board mounted. I would have no qualms about working on this one. I turned down a Marshall TSL 100 job today as I have no interest in working on that class of Marshall.
     
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  5. Andy B

    Andy B Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    DSL’s and TSL’s take a special sort of masochist and I ought to know. Done lots of them. We figured out how to make them work at one point. As long as you charge enough to pay for your time you can come out OK.
     
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  6. OneHenry

    OneHenry Tele-Holic

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    i wouldn't turn down a job in this amp, but I know that my lighted magnifier would get used while working on this amp. Damn, I didn't notice the Noval sockets, I must have seen the Octal sockets and stopped looking. Yeah, the PCB does look very solid. It just seemed very "busy" to me, with numerous small components mounted on the foil side. The traces are nice and wide and spaced well. I also didn't see any component designations on the board.

    I guess that I am used to working on Military and Heathkit PCBs.

    I hated working on cheap GE color TVs; almost the entire chassis was one large, poorly made PCB with tube sockets mounted directly on it, the Compactron horizontal sweep tubes got especially hot and would burn PCBs. Military PCBs suck in their own ways, especially the conformal coatings on them that had to be removed to properly repair the board.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
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  7. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    One Henry, I opened up a friend’s newly acquired Pro Sonic yesterday just to have a look see at the interior. Lol....someone did an aerial act between a power resistor and the slope resistor and treble cap that connect to one end of that power resistor rather than do a proper job of lifting the quality PCB in that amp. It appears that all of the front panel pots, jacks and switch will have to be dropped off of the panel. They are hard wired but they still need to come off of the panel they get under the board. I have never had to lift a board open one of these, but I would not have done what the tech who did this did. The only excuse is that they did not have time. It is as well done as it can be other than to do it properly. I’ll get a pic for ya’ll.
     
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