Anybody interested in the Recording Revolution/Jacquire King course being offered?

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by woodman, Jul 29, 2019.

  1. scottser

    scottser Tele-Afflicted

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    Every day is a school day, so it might as well be something you'll love. Don't think about it, just do it.
     
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  2. Rolling Estonian

    Rolling Estonian Friend of Leo's

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    To borrow a phrase: Keep swinging that hammer Woody!

    It's awesome that you're moving forward while hammering home the essentials. Your dedication is impressive and your enthusiasm sure seems like you're younger than you say! I think I could speak for everyone on RIP when I say your contributions are amazing and we're all truly fortunate to have you here and know we'll keep seeing continued successes! Great to just watch it unfold.

    M
     
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  3. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Aw shucks!
     
  4. aux8

    aux8 Tele-Meister

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    ^^ THIS
     
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  5. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    I'm almost halfway through, getting enough out of it to continue. What I'm looking for in the course are game-changers — techniques and insights that will alter my workflow and audio philosophy for the good. Quite a few so far, but the meaty part is yet to come. But it is a class, you have to force yourself to sit there and listen when you'd rather be laying down tracks! But that's OK ... I have no doubt it'll help improve my work.
     
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  6. burntfrijoles

    burntfrijoles Poster Extraordinaire

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    Don't be so hard on yourself. No matter how much you want to improve and produce higher quality work, it's still recreation and supposed to be fun. Admittedly it's frustrating fun but it's a pursuit. I really suck and I think I started out in Logic 8 (the light version) around 2005 or '06. Prior to that I had a couple of hard disk recorder and portastudios prior to that.
    I've finally accepted the "good enough" skill level of recording. That's not to say I'm not still trying to learn new tips, techniques but as Dirty Harry would say "a man got to know his limitations".

    Good luck in your pursuit. Hopefully the course offers some great "aha" moments for you and gets you to that next level.
     
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  7. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Would love to hear your takeaways once you’ve had some time to absorb this.

    I know Jacquire likes his SM7.

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
  8. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    More on Jacquire FYI. First half talks about how he got started, some of the records he worked in that advanced his career etc. Second half is a tour of his studio. He likes his compressors!

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
  9. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Yeah, the SM7 is one thing we have in common!

    This course is like 30+ hours, that's a load! At first I thought I'd just dedicate several days to nothing but lessons, but how quickly I was overwhelmed! Then I snagged an outside project, which will more than pay for the course, so I've slowed down on the coursework. But while I'm gathering a good crop of game-changers, I've realized there's a philosophical disconnect.

    The subject of this course, no bones about it, is making successful records. The focus is on a methodical approach to producing hits, selling records and getting huge streaming numbers by fashioning a modern sound the general audience will flock to. You write your song, then record all your tracks, then follow a strictly ordered mix process, doing it all by the numbers and checking it off on your checklist.

    Now, you guys who've been around here for a while know this isn't how I work. I like to throw paint at the wall until it starts looking like something, then make it look more like that than it did before. Songwriting, recording and mixing are jumbled together — any one of those elements can be taking place at any time. I might be closing in on a mix and decide to track a marimba or accordion. Hell, right now I'm halfway through a song I don't even have the bridge written for —IOW, I don't even know what the song's about yet, even though most of it is mix-ready!

    This approach requires a deep belief in magic and relentless persistence, but something interesting almost always emerges, even though it may be light-years from the Top 40. I don't even know why I do it, except that it's there to do.

    But don't get me wrong — there's a LOT of great material in this course that will help give me a growth spurt in this wacky art until the men in the little white coats come to drag me away — whether it's to the loony bin or the geezer farm! :D
     
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  10. KCKC

    KCKC Tele-Afflicted

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    Sounds like it's well worth the money. Good catch woody!
     
  11. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have to ask this Woody,

    Are you ever going to remix some of your older tunes
    with your new found techniques?
     
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  12. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Oh, inevitably. That's assuming I ever get through the coursework! But at least once a month I hear one of my oldies and think, "What was I thinking?" ... Followed by a remix to one degree or another. So I imagine there'll be a flood tide in months to come.
     
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  13. Middleman

    Middleman Friend of Leo's

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    Ok woodman, you hooked me. I purchased the course because I found out he did one of the Nora Jones albums and also the last Buddy Guy album although he only tracked, the mix was done my someone else. There are some questions I had about both albums so I swung the entry fee.

    Here's my take away so far. Hardware is good. The better the hardware, the easier/faster (did not say better but yeah, maybe) it is to mix a really good project. Also note, there is the main song which he uses for pretty much the entire course but he has an acoustic and pop tune example as well in the bonus material. That was very useful. The run through of his master buss was the most educational information I've run across anywhere i.e. his level goals for CD and Streaming. Also the Delay and Reverb approaches as well as automation thinking and approach. Two thumbs up for the course.

    There were some crazy and rambling parts of the course which I just had to skip through and I thought there could have been some better editing done but for sure there are many, many jewels of information I had not run across prior. What was interesting was his mastery of his plugins. I discovered features in many plugins which I own that I was not aware existed especially in the Fabfilter EQ and Limiter. Thanks for your thread and the heads up.
     
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  14. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Couple thoughts. In the vid I posted Jacquire was a strong advocate of printing stuff as you’re recording. Absolutely. But, the stuff he gets is probably very well done demos before it gets to him. Probably also with some pre production time.

    Very different if you don’t have that road map.

    And, the tour of his outboard was interesting. Lots of près compressors etc. But only one time based device, an H 3000 IIRC, and it didn’t work. So, he’s leaning heavily on compressors out of the box, but time based stuff like reverbs, delays etc. In software? Wondering how much he uses software compressors and eqs in the course. Especially given his opinion about compressors being as much about the character/ tonality than just a volume rider. And IMO some of them get close, but ...? Then again they can also do stuff their hardware analogues can’t, so there’s that.
    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
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  15. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Good points, Geoff ... I'll comment on all the above and more when I finish the course — still tied up with an outside project ... the guy's on his way now for the final vocal session, so within a few days I should be free at last!
     
  16. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Well, I finally finished up my outside project and dived headfirst into the course, swimming til I was gasping for breath. There's a lot there, some of which is out of my league, but also some huge game-changers. Just seeing how someone like Jacquire King thinks through his process is an eye-opener into an audio world I never dreamed of. We sometimes use the "can't see the forest for the trees" metaphor when we get lost in a mix, but he not only sees the forest and trees, he sees the molecules in the trees! I'd hate for him to hear one of my mixes — he'd be looking for a window to jump out of! :eek:

    There's a lot of background and general information plus Q&A on the front end, but the highlights are preproduction, tracking, editing and mixing walk-throughs on a song written and performed by Graham Cochrane, the Recording Revolution guy. Graham's original version wasn't too shabby at all, but Jacquire took it to another level. You watch him make his engineering moves in real time while he explains what he's doing and why he's doing it. Tips, tricks and techniques flying through the air like buckshot. His methods are intensely complex, but it was easy to sift out what I could put to use in my much simpler world. I began to listen and think in a different way, for lack of a better description.

    His mix has more buses than the largest Greyhound station in the world. I counted at least 16 for the drums alone, and each vocal and instrument track has several. Examples: a snare+kick bus, a bass+kick bus, a bus to accentuate the hi-hat in the overhead mike. ... He sets up light comp (-1 dB) and limiting (-.5 dB) on his mix bus at the very beginning, along with an EQ for tonal balance as the mix evolves. Tons of parallel tracks for different purposes I didn't completely understand and, quite honestly, sometimes couldn't hear the difference (headphones mandatory). At one point, he instantiates an EQ for a half-dB mid boost on one of many vocal (IIRC) buses! But the finished mix sounds like a million bucks, and that's what counts.

    So, while I feel like I got my money's worth, the bonus is that, as my meager skills evolve, all that material can be called up anytime for review. I'll be experimenting for a long while — gives me something to fill those empty hours in my old age! :D
     
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  17. studio

    studio Poster Extraordinaire

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    Really glad to hear it Woody!

    What is something you can tell us that would be considered beyond the scope of
    an everyday home studio project?

    What can you recommend to us mere mortals to implement
    for ourselves going forward?

    Congrats on your completion!

    Yer standing on the shoulders of giants!

    [​IMG]
     
  18. KCKC

    KCKC Tele-Afflicted

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    Sounds like a great course! Something I would definitely have to consider in the future!

    KC
     
  19. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Gold Supporter

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    Well, when I boil down everything in the vast course of study, it all comes back to developing your ears, knowing your tools, and being familiar with the infinity of approches to audio problem-solving — and all that points back at experience. Finishing projects! Taking your lumps when you make mistakes! Letting discouragement roll off your back! Not letting praise go to your head just because you DID finish a project! Every one you finish builds up like coats of lacquer on a guitar and makes you a better recordist. It's essential, that build-up of experience. So, to use a line familiar to many on this board:
    Keep swinging the hammer!
    (Just don't beat yourself over the head with it!)
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2019
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  20. jkmix

    jkmix NEW MEMBER!

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    Hello and thanks for discussing the course here! I'm glad overall you folks seem to find value for your time and money. There was a real effort to make it as complete a study as is possible in a limited format.. especially with only one full production from beginning to end. Hopefully there is enough in the full scope of the content to inspire and create ideas for your own projects. There are so many ways to be a creative in the studio and engineer a recording.. some of the techniques possibly open doors in the mind to even better applications for you. Best wishes and keep at it because the journey never ends if you keep exploring. Gratefully, Jacquire King
     
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