Anybody here into bushcraft?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by garytelecastor, Feb 24, 2017.

  1. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Here in Oz the men do a lot of the cooking -reason Bushcraft. You never know when you need to make a shelter, start a fire, cook food and water -all of which is important.
    We are not big on boy scouts but mates camping/surfing trips was part of growing up.
    Pity the millennials.JMHO
     
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  2. rze99

    rze99 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sounds poetic and all that. But I once spent a week camping in Norfolk. It rained the whole week. I will NEVER go camping ever again.
     
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  3. jackinjax

    jackinjax Friend of Leo's

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    I understand the sometime basic need to take a step back from modern technology and get in touch with nature and our inner caveman.
    For alll of you who shun all modern conveniences to achieve this, more power to you, and knock yourselves out. Turning off the TV for a few hours does it for me.
     
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  4. Stubee

    Stubee Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    That pic is north of there, up in Ontario above Baudette. I drive past the Boundary Waters to get to my place. Beautiful country. IMG_3514.JPG
     
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  5. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    Not actively "into" bushcraft - but that stuff is always with me somehow. I think I'll pack a backpack some nice and warm summer day and go into the woods for a night or two...
     
  6. AngelDeville

    AngelDeville Tele-Afflicted

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    Not since some time in the 80's...

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    that's one way to put it.
     
  8. middy

    middy Friend of Leo's

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    I lived in a tent for years, so I've done my time... not a big thrill anymore.

    I still like to get away sometimes, though. I think "glamping" would be more my speed these days.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Friend of Leo's

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    It is. Any other way of putting would likely violate some forum rules...................:D
     
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  10. telestratosonic

    telestratosonic Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Watched a couple of his videos. Excellent and informative.

    At 67, I don't sleep on the ground or do bushcraft anymore but that was how we did it as kids. We would camp with our father in the fifties and sixties on fishing trips. He taught us how to snare rabbits and skin them. We ate a lot of rabbit, moose, and ducks growing up.

    I was a Boy Scout and went to two two-week summer camps in 1963 and 1964 where we slept in tents on a ground sheet. We learned all sorts of bushcraft.

    These kinds of skills are good to know.
     
  11. since 1963

    since 1963 Tele-Meister

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    An "all expenses paid" trip to Viet Nam and waking up in the bush covered in ants..no..no, thank you.
     
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  12. hazcat

    hazcat Tele-Meister

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    I'm really attracted to the idea of bushcrafting, but in reality I'm a backpacker who admires Mors Kochanski and owns an unusual number of knives.
     
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  13. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I watched The Revenant this weekend. Lots of great camping ideas in that movie!
     
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  14. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Spyglass Inn-- there's a fun surf break I like to hit there when passing through.

    I like backpacking with my family, and I have to thank my Dad and Boy Scouts for getting me started. When you have to carry it all on your back the trade off between comfort vs more weight to carry becomes very fraught. Someday it would ne great to have a llama, donkey , or mule carry a buttload of gear for me so I could wilderness "glamp".
     
  15. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Where are you going in? What time of year? How far are you planning on going in? How long are you going to stay there? Is it just the three of you that are going? Are you planning on bringing any family with you?
     
  16. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    I saw the Revenant as well. Good flick, and it is supposed to be loosely-VERY loosely-based on Hugh Glass. The real Hugh Glass got attacked by a Grizzly when he was out scouting for Indians in the Western Dakotas. He had, as they say, sand. He laid there for three days between life and death and the two guys who stayed behind to bury him when he died, left on the third day thinking he was going to die shortly and they saw Indian scouts out looking for them. The thing they did wrong was they took his knife and rifle, his possibles sack, and all the horses.
    On the 3rd day when he came to, he saw he was alone, and had a broken leg, so he the first thing he had to do was set his own leg. Then he crawled to water and stayed put eating bugs and stuff until he could move without passing out. He crawled for miles and ate what he could by chasing coyotes and wolves off of fresh killed prey. He said at one point that he wasn't sure whether he was hallucinating or it was real-turned out to be real-but he remembered a Sioux hunting party that rode up on him. They found his track and had searched until they located him. They encircled him and followed him for a day trying to decide whether to kill him or not. He would walk a few steps and then begin to crawl again. He said that the brave leading the group said that as he was tough enough to have done what he had done it wouldn't be right to kill him. Eventually he was found near an Army post on the east side of the Dakotas. He was nursed back to health, then he set out to track down the two men that had left him to die. Again, he wasn't upset about that, he understood it, it was their taking his supplies that he felt needed to be answered for by these clowns.
    The older of the two had joined the Army as a scout so he couldn't kill him without getting killed himself. But he tracked Jim Bridger down to a fort that was by the North Dakota/Mn border. There had been a blizzard for a week and he walked the whole way in the snow, well over 50 miles. When he got to the fort he went to the drinking room and threw open the door. His clothes were completely white from the snow and his hair and beard were frosted by the cold. Bridger almost fainted because he said that he thought it was Glass' ghost come to "settle accounts for leavin' him there to be scalped".
    Glass said, "I came here to kill ya for what ya dun to me in the territory, but I can see you are sorry, so I am going to let it go." He turned around and walked out back into the storm and no white man ever saw him again. He was killed by Indians on the Wyoming/Montana territories going after furs.
    If you want a GREAT book to read about the Mountain men and the Voyageurs pick up "Give your heart to the hawks". It has every aspect of their lives and a bunch of stories about these guys. They were as hard as titanium.
     
  17. Anode100

    Anode100 Friend of Leo's

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    I have a work colleague who makes his own knives.

    Odd really, since the rest of us just use the cutlery in the kitchen...

    I admire anyone with those skills - and look forward to a decent summer when I can get outdoors with my boy.
     
  18. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    Looks gorgeous Stub. I know what you mean about the fall and the woods. When those leaves begin to decompose they give off this very earthy smell that is just invigorating.
    I think that a lot of people can't understand the emotional content of being out there because they have never experienced it themselves. It's far different being 20 miles in on a trip with no one around for miles than just renting a slot in a campground. I live in an area that allows me to get the coyotes going on a clear night and it is just surreal.
    We were doing a canoe trip a while back and we came up on a mother Loon. She had three chicks with her and she followed us across the lake to the other side where we hit the portage. I got pictures of it. It is so funny. Them little fur balls behind her kicking their legs to keep up and mom just a swimming away.
    At night, and I know you know this, they call to each other and man does that make the fire nice.
    Made some pine needle tea last sat and sun.
     
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  19. garytelecastor

    garytelecastor Poster Extraordinaire

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    You might find it a bit different today. There aren't a whole lot of punji stake pits, and not too many people firing AK's at you. The ants don't bother you anyway. :)
    Welcome home, and thank you.
     
  20. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Best I can muster at this point is mental bushcraft from other people's ideas, but it would be nice to rough it in the woods and see what I am made of.
     
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