Any sailors aboard?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Downshift, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. Downshift

    Downshift Tele-Holic

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    I have no sailing experience whatsoever, however my grandpa was in the Navy, then worked as a marina manager for 30 years, and retired to live aboard his 29' sailboat.

    I have a fascination with the idea of getting a sailboat and learning to do some coastal cruising. Grandpa sailed the Atlantic in his sailboat...I don't know if I'd have the guts to do that, but I wouldn't mind a trip to the Caribbean.

    Anyone here a sailor?
     
  2. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    No boat but I like sailing. My dad had several boats we sailed all the time in the 80's and 90's. I live in a sailing town.
     
  3. BooNin

    BooNin Tele-Meister

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    Sailed most of my life, from dinghies, keelboats, yachts...I've been sailing professionally for nearly 12 years, teaching sailing to others, corporate charters, private charters and racing.

    Currently an officer on a cruise ship, but will probably go back to racing yachts.

    Working on boats has given me a great career and I've seen the world. Last contract we visited 47 countries over 4 months.

    My advice, go and charter for a weekend, could be a 'make or break' event! It's not for everyone.
     
  4. Del Pickup

    Del Pickup Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would love to buy a decent sized 35-40 foot yacht to live onboard. I had a few speedboats in the past but hadn't done any sailing until recently when I took lessons at one of the local yacht clubs.

    Thoroughly enjoyed it but very quickly realised that I wasn't interested in racing but am definitely into the cruising style of life.

    Would thoroughly recommend it.
     
  5. adifferentbreed

    adifferentbreed Tele-Afflicted

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    Just do it. Been sailing my whole life, nothing like it in this world. Plus, you can take your guitar with you.
     
  6. Downshift

    Downshift Tele-Holic

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    Early retirement and living aboard a sailboat cruising is definitely one of my dreams. Maybe with time I'd become skilled and qualified enough to take on the oceans blue and visit the world...I'd love it.

    How does one learn to sail? I live in Arizona and never grew up near water. Is there a course to take, read a whole lot, learn from a buddy, or just go give it a shot?

    I'd also love a yacht...but I don't think there's anyway I could afford one. My dream is to find a good, seaworthy old boat, gut the inside of it, and beautify it to make it have some yacht style.
     
  7. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yeh, I've done a lot of sailing over the years... from club sailing on all sized yachts to racing on ocean going 80 footers.... crossing oceans....;)

    free power, the wind... it's great ... :)
     
  8. 64Strat

    64Strat Friend of Leo's Vendor Member

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    yeah.... I've crewed and captained 30+ foot Ericsson (Lake Michigan) and Gulfstream (Caribbean). I love the peace and slow pace and being a pilot, I always have an eye to the weather. I owned a 14' Hobie and that was a blast too!

    here's the view from the cockpit of a Gulfstream 34'...
    [​IMG]
     
  9. oldtelefart

    oldtelefart Tele-Meister

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    I've sailed since I was a teenager. Co-owned a 28' Wharram catamaran in my 20's. Did about 30,000 miles at sea working on cargo ships on the Cape Town to Europe run in the 1970's.

    Being on a boat in perfect weather can be heavenly. Being on a boat in a storm, exhausted, with things going wrong and a very real chance of drowning, is not so nice.

    It's not for everybody. You need to learn a lot of different skills, and you have to be prepared to put up with a level of discomfort proportional to the size of boat you can afford. Living on a boat can cost the same/ more than living ashore.

    It's a lovely dream, but like most dreams the reality can be harsh.
     
  10. voodoo_idol

    voodoo_idol Friend of Leo's

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    I had sailed off and on without training since I was a kid, but decided to get my basic US Sailing certification at Offshore Sailing School in 2006. Completed it in 5 days while on vacation in my hometown (Sanibel/Captiva FL). They have follow on courses that will give you more advanced certifications that will let you do bareboat charters. I recommend them highly. East coast and Caribbean locations only. Their Colgate 26 is an ideal boat to learn on.

    http://www.offshoresailing.com

    If I recall correctly, their summer courses in FL cost less due to heat and humidity (I did mine in September). You should be able to handle the heat part, right?
     
  11. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    After crewing for years down the local Yacht club a few of us decided to get a yacht of our own for club racing late 80's ...:D

    We bought a Jobert SA design 30' that was built in '64 and was named "Nirvana" back then... a 3/4 rig, running a masthead kite...:D

    we started racing it about the time Nirvana the band came along..... so naturally folks thought we named it after the band.... derrrr..:rolleyes:

    it was a flat bottomed hard chine style and we had to sail it hard against the GRP modern craft in our Div2 class... a big surfboard... it didn't point as high up wind,,, downwind is was fast.... yee haa... we did OK... but sailed the thing to breaking point most days to compete....:twisted:

    for our last big Winter series we hauled it out and give the bottom a good clean and repainted the thing.... with a Bhudda icon....:cool:

    Winners are Grinners...:D
     

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  13. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I've done a bit of club racing in a harbour just to the north of Sydney in a 30 footer. Fun stuff.

    I'm terrible at driving the thing myself though - I'm the guy who the skipper yells at to pull on the ropes harder. When left to myself I'm the king of the Chinese Gybe!
     
  14. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Chinese gybe.... shudder,,,,, not fun on a big boat....:lol:

    We were racing this 60' Siska2 up from Sydney to Mooloolaba one time... we're out off Jumpinpin Bar, middle of the night, sou'easter blowing, a lea shore under a big kite....
    and the pin self fired on the spinnaker pole... kite flew off then dropped in the water.. 1200 sq feet of it..... boat did a crazy Uturn in a few seconds.... CRASH Bang!,,while we tried to drag the kite back over the rail.... I thought it was going to drag me overboard never to be seen again.....:lol:

    plenty of others, too. while racing,,, scarey stuff..:twisted:
     

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  15. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

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    Use to help sail a 45' Hudson...

    also, USCG
     
  16. gandsfjord

    gandsfjord Tele-Meister

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    I've owned several sailboats over the past 25 years. Spent half a year without a sailboat once (in '94) and won't do that again :p

    Don't let the 'horror stories' above about 'all standing chinese gybes' etc scare you from sailing. Those things don't happen unless you provoke them. I.e. sailing spinnaker in far too much wind etc. I've been racing for 20 years, so I also have all those stories. Never had anything nearly as dramatic happening when sailing with the family - or just relaxing on the water by myself.

    Regarding boat size, there are drawbacks that work inversely with the benefits as size grows. You probably want a boat that you can handle alone - including going to and from the dock - alone in all kinds of weather. The bigger the boat, that harder this gets. I'd say that 43' - 45' is probably the upper limit for comfortably doing this. 32'- 35' is probably close to the lower limit for living aboard with a reasonable level of comfort. Including space to put stuff.

    Others may disagree with the numbers, but those are the ones I'd set for myself.

    I have a 35' - and the forces acting on this in moderate weather are still small enough that you can make something happen - or avert something like a unwanted gybe or similar - by just grabbing something with your hand and pushing or pulling it. On a 45' you probably don't want to grab something as the forces will be far greater, even in very moderate weather.

    Also, think about draught and mast height compared to bridges and cables in your home area. And depth of water of course.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Boats I've owned
     
  17. 1962guitargeek

    1962guitargeek Friend of Leo's

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    I had just learned to sail back in 95...I was looking at a 30 foot live aboard, lost my job & had to transfer...


    It's so ironic, I had much more spending $$$ making 30k a year than I do making 60K...:rolleyes:

    still have the dream, maybe someday...
     
  18. Downshift

    Downshift Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the link. I would have never thought to look for such a thing.

    Thanks everyone else for all the responses. The boats I'm looking at are in the 35-40' range. I'm married, and the wife is also very into the idea. We're not too concerned about space, but there needs to be enough room for the both of us. The boats we're looking at are in the 35-40' foot range (though we fantasize about some of these million dollar yachts we keep seeing on the internet. My goodness those are nice.)
     
  19. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Here’s a little sailing story. My brother used to work on boats and a nonprofit camp I think it was owed him money they couldn’t pay. The offered him a boat someone had donated as payment. Bear in mind he loves wood, had been building wooden lobster boats in Maine and a lot of his business at the time was wooden boats. So he accepted a 30 foot 1930 something wooden sailboat as payment. I think it was a Hinkley designed by John Alden. It had been a beautiful boat in its time.

    My brother and I and friend had my wife drive us down to the West River below Annapolis to the yard where it was. Our intent to was to take it to Rock Hall where my brother had his shop on the other side of the Chesapeake Bay.

    The guys at the marina asked us where we we’re taking it and didn’t really comment when we told them. Maybe they gave each other “looks” or maybe my memory is adding them, in any event off we went. I think we raised sail right out of the marina. About 45 minutes out I went below to find about 12” of water.

    There was an opening in the hull about 2” long and 1/8th wide maybe. The bilge pump was original equipment, a hand pump that broke immediately. The engine had seawater cooling so we used the intake hose to pump the water out of the hull. The only thing we had to use to plug the holes were pieces of clothing we tore up.

    That’s the only time we ever got the engine to run. We went up the Severn River from Annapolis to the marina at my parent’s neighborhood instead of crossing the bay.

    We plugged the hole by dumping saw dust out of can taped to stick on the outside of the hull near the leak, bought a battery powered bilge pump and eventually sailed in across the bay.

    Unfortunately my brother never had the means to really restore the boat, and sold it to someone else who didn’t either. I think it was cut up eventually.

    It looked much like this -
     

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  20. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    You're welcome.
     
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