Any recommendations for a classical guitar book with tunes and techniques?

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by Gogogoch, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. Gogogoch

    Gogogoch TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    76
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2016
    Location:
    UK
    Hi there,

    Greetings from the UK.
    I've been teaching myself to sight-read using James Longworth and Nick Walker's Guitar Basics books and I've reached the end of them now.

    Can anyone recommend a good book to continue in the classical guitar style?

    Friends have suggested The Guitarist's Way, but I'm not sure there is enough info on right-hand techniques in them.

    I'm looking for a book (I don't want online courses) that features tunes and techniques - particularly right hand techniques - rather than just scales and exercises.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Sounds Good

    Sounds Good Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    748
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2017
    Location:
    Luton UK
    Post Deleted!
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
  3. richiek65

    richiek65 Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,897
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2012
    Location:
    Sydney NSW Australia
    Screenshot_20190718-184342.png This guy kept me going for a few years when I was a youngster
     
  4. Sounds Good

    Sounds Good Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    748
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2017
    Location:
    Luton UK
    Sorry is classical guitar should of read the post through slower so forget my post which is now deleted.
     
  5. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,534
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    NELA, Ca
    Frederick Noad - 'solo guitar playing, book 1'. There is also a book 2.
    These are the idustry standard for learning classical guitar.
    Supplement with Giuliani Studies for the right hand and the Segovia Scales booklet.
     
    PhredE likes this.
  6. Gogogoch

    Gogogoch TDPRI Member

    Posts:
    76
    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2016
    Location:
    UK
    No worries. I'm also interested in other styles, so if you have any recommendations there, that'd be appreciated too. Cheers.
     
    Sounds Good likes this.
  7. kplamann

    kplamann Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    720
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2003
    Location:
    Paris region, France
    This is a great, comprehensive and inexpensive collection of classical guitar pieces of varying difficulty.

    If I were you I'd start with Fernando Sor.

    There is also a second volume and a version for "easy" guitar.


    [​IMG]
     
    Toast and PhredE like this.
  8. PhredE

    PhredE Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    320
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Location:
    Suburban PDX, OR
    +1

    And the Sor studies/pieces for 'easy' guitar are good also. There was a series of technique books by Michael Shearer (published only in US that I know of) that were fantastic if you can find them. They might worth a look.

    For starter tunes, Francisco Tarrega's Lagrima is considered a 'go to' piece. Sor's Folias d'Espana is popular too -- don't let the complexity of the second section put you off -- it's actually easier to play than the music appears . Both in E/Em so you'll get to hit a lot of open strings (E,E,B,G) in the process too.

    Best of all, go watch a good player perform -- live, in the flesh if possible. Second best, is a collection of good YouTube vids from top notch players.

    Best of luck in your quest!
     
  9. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,346
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2016
    Location:
    USA
  10. twangjeff

    twangjeff Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,124
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Thanks everybody for the responses. This has inspired me to dust off a part of my bookshelf that I haven't visited in a while. It's funny, I started playing classical as a kid and played jazz in school. Now most of my gigs are country, but it is refreshing to take a break and get back to where you came from for lack of a better term.

    Cheers!
     
  11. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,020
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    Location:
    omaha
    If you want to learn to play (study) classical guitar, I think you should consider a teacher for a while at least. If there is a university anywhere near you, I'd contact the music department and get a recommendation for one.
     
  12. Toast

    Toast Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    383
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2019
    Location:
    On Assignment
    Edit: Duplicate
     
  13. Toast

    Toast Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    383
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2019
    Location:
    On Assignment
    I used to have that book, but I threw all of my guitar books away (Aargh!) during one particularly frustrating apartment move. Anyway, I enjoyed that book; it has a lot of fun songs in it.
     
  14. Sounds Good

    Sounds Good Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    748
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2017
    Location:
    Luton UK
    Well it depends on the music you want to play i take it is the harder stuff because on the net the tabs are not that accurate for many of those type of songs, i have some song books and practice books i use at times.

    With styles for the right hand, again what styles are you trying to get better with finger style maybe if you play classical, i just use the pick now and some legato but i just play rock and jazz fusion rock mainly.
     
  15. KATT

    KATT NEW MEMBER!

    Posts:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Location:
    Southend, England
    I also recommend the Frederick Noad's Solo Guitar Playing books which I worked through myself.

    It may be worth considering those in conjunction with some grade books (e.g. ABRSM) for scales and pieces. I taught myself using these books and decided to take some grades, eventually working my way from grade 5 up to a distinction at grade 8.

    For me, entering myself into the exams gave me a goal to aim for and a steady progression in terms of the difficulty of pieces I was learning. I appreciate exams aren't for everyone though!
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.