Any Pink Floyd Fans Out There?

AAT65

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For some reason I thought it was a Tele. As someone else pointed out, Gilmourish.com lists all the gear for each album and he has it as a Strat.

It didn't make sense that the song is in the key of G but had an F chord (vs F#dim). I found out later that bands flat the 7 chord in rock.

Thanks for sharing the video. Never seen that before. I wonder why Nick Mason isn't playing drums..
I am sure the gilmourish equipment listing is right -- that guy has done a ton of research!! So we can settle on Strat for the original, like the rest of the AHM album.

The video I posted is Gilmour's band from 2006 or so -- same as on the Live In Gdansk set I believe. Steve diStanislao on drums, along with long-time sideman Guy Pratt on bass, Rick Wright playing some of his final shows, Phil Manzanera on guitar.
 

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Isn't Fearless in the tuning of open D?
no I figured it out in G , the opening is a run of the G scale in the first position minus the second , then a C to B flat power chord to G , the middle part I can play ( but I dont know the chord names ) the verse goes G to A first position to D to G to C to G to C to G to C to D back to G

something like that

I found this on youtube but He got the middle 8 part wrong , how ever the rest is how i play it also his timing is to static to a four beat

 

archiestone

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For you BOSS Katana devotees: In the Tone Studio there is a patch you can upload called "Pink Wall" that sounds *a lot* like Gilmour's lead solo tone on 'Comfortably Numb.' Worth checking out anyway. I enjoyed it while I had my Katana (and kind of miss it.)
 

arlum

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I like almost everything by Pink Floyd but, to my taste, their best stuff starts with The Dark Side of the Moon and ends with The Wall. There's not one single song on any of the four albums from this period that I don't like. Both prior and after this time frame their albums had some great pieces but also some not so great. Still .... Love the band. Especially David Gilmour.
 

mr natural

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Oddly, I mostly listen to everything before DSOTM these days and especially the Amsterdam ‘69 show. To me DSOTM didn’t break new ground but basically summed up everything they had learned up to that point very nicely. It sort of put all the pieces together.
 

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Oddly, I mostly listen to everything before DSOTM these days and especially the Amsterdam ‘69 show. To me DSOTM didn’t break new ground but basically summed up everything they had learned up to that point very nicely. It sort of put all the pieces together.
the basic difference in DSOTM (or eclipse as it was originally called) was the creative freedon at Abby Road / EMI with Alan Parsons at the helm and not the "men in white "
he was ble to keep the technical experiments alive and give the silences room to breathe, letting the band use their creative energies unencumbered. How ever PF reached a point that even PF could not match that pinnacle again.

Bob Ezrin produced the post Waters era stuff after the Wall , when Waters lost it on a fan in Montreal and spit at the fan , Waters then came up with the concept of building a wall between the audience and the band. then the fighting began , blah,blah , fire Rick Wright, fight for the name , put some balls on the flying pig , adnausium . I like all of the later post Waters PF including the live concerts .

if you ever wondered how a PF jam went , this is how songs came about





 
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mr natural

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the basic difference in DSOTM (or eclipse as it was originally called) was the creative freedon at Abby Road / EMI with Alan Parsons at the helm and not the "men in white "
he was ble to keep the technical experiments alive and give the silences room to breathe, letting the band use their creative energies unencumbered. How ever PF reached a point that even PF could not match that pinnacle again.

Bob Ezrin produced the post Waters era stuff after the Wall , when Waters lost it on a fan in Montreal and spit at the fan , Waters then came up with the concept of building a wall between the audience and the band. then the fighting began , blah,blah , fire Rick Wright, fight for the name , put some balls on the flying pig , adnausium . I like all of the later post Waters PF including the live concerts .

if you ever wondered hoe a PF jam went , this is how songs came about
Yeah, the production on DSOTM was completely unmatched at the time. Also, the sax was a nice addition to their palette as were the female vocals. I’m not knocking the album, just saying that they took everything they had learned from the very beginning and threw it all together into a cohesive whole. It was like their thesis or something. Wish You Were here was almost the same but way more bluesey overall. To me Animals is where they really took it in a new direction and Roger was definitely in charge of that direction which played out in the remaining albums before the split. Trivia: DSOTM is the only Floyd album with no acoustic guitar.
 

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Yeah, the production on DSOTM was completely unmatched at the time. Also, the sax was a nice addition to their palette as were the female vocals. I’m not knocking the album, just saying that they took everything they had learned from the very beginning and threw it all together into a cohesive whole. It was like their thesis or something. Wish You Were here was almost the same but way more bluesey overall. To me Animals is where they really took it in a new direction and Roger was definitely in charge of that direction which played out in the remaining albums before the split. Trivia: DSOTM is the only Floyd album with no acoustic guitar.
appearently Dick perry was one of Daves close friends, from school and was a fine sax player , he appeared on a lot of shows with PF , I beleive Bob Ezrin or Alan parsons was the one that got them to use the background singers, the girl who sang Great Gig in the sky , came in and was warming up as she did her part and got carried away basically skatting over the piano part and when she finished she apologized for what she had done , but the band were floored by how perfect her performance was for the feel, and the rest is history

Polly Samson was responsable for most of the lyrics on momentary lapse of reason , but did not want to use her name ( she was a professional writer so words came to her easily) I believe for division bell as well, and up to Rattle that lock .

I like on an Island for the feel, that and it had David Crosby, and Graham Nash doing background vocals with Phil Manzanera on guitar . Very cool by all standards.
 

knopflerfan

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Big fan of "middle period" Pink Floyd - Dark Side Of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, and Animals. David Gilmour is my second favorite guitarist, behind Mark Knopfler. Gilmour's playing on those three albums is nothing less than genius. The Wall is OK - but, too much Waters "strangeness".
 

Hey_you

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tubedude

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I'm recording some PF songs that have a Telecaster into a Digitech Trio (haven't built a new DAW yet). I already did Corporal Clegg and am doing Astronomy Domine right now. Dogs and Sheep from the Animals album were also on Teles but they are a bit long. I had also recorded Fat Old Sun with my Strat and the outro solo is fun to play. What sucks is that I can't sing though. It is still all fun to play.

Anyone else doing something similar? I'm doing a few Yes songs after that with my George Benson guitar. Steve Howe has a few Tele songs but they are long.

My 16 year old daughter is tired of hearing me talk about this so I thought I would share here...
Post the Yes Trax when done!
 

Chuckster

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Coincidence this thread popped up...

I needed a winter challenge, so I've taken on the insane attempt to learn Shine On, start to finish. One of my all-time faves, even though I dislike guitar solos in general.

For those interested, Carl Brown does a great 5-part breakdown for advanced players:

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Lessons
 

3-Chord-Genius

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I was a fan, saw them three times. Not a fan of Roger Waters, but I liked the other three.

Before I even picked up a guitar I knew Gilmour's playing sounded better (to me ) than most. The secret to his playing is not in technique, as he generally stays within the blues scales; it's in note selection and having a good sense of melody, which is easy for him because Pink Floyd progressions are not standard blues progressions. The more interesting the song, the more tonal options you have in your improvisation. Notes that would sound pretty standard in a normal rock progression suddenly take on new life when their surroundings change.
 




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