Any Fantasy Geeks Here?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by ElJay370, Sep 22, 2020.

  1. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    Problem is that you need friends to play, and if you don't have any who are into D&D, you have got to find online folks who are patient enough to cope with a newbie. Not sure it is going to happen. It sounds like something i might want to try.

    Let's make a TDPRI D&D team.

    @branbolio brandishes the telecaster of doom and hits gibsonguy420 in the head, causing 25 damages, and a babyshark earworm for the next 2 turns.

    @ElJay370 saves against the wrath of the wahwah, and counter with a dimed fendertwin attack, causing permanent braintinitus to goldtopnerd.

    Edit i can almost fake it. I might train to learn to be a role master.
     
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  2. clayville

    clayville Tele-Meister

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    True story: from about 1998-2006 I was the Tolkien Projects Director for Houghton Mifflin publishers - home of Tolkien in the US since 1938 - and in charge of all Tolkien publishing in the US (except the smaller mass market paperbacks which we'd been licensing to Ballantine for decades). These were the years leading up to and through Peter Jackson's LotR films, so it was, er, kind of like having a Balrog by the tail.

    It all looks a little different in retrospect than it did before Fellowship released. I was trying to defend their status as (more or less) the Greatest Adventure Stories ever written in the face of a potential threat from what were, at first, films of completely unknown quality being directed by, well, the director of "Meet the Feebles". Strategically, we were playing both Defense and Offense to protect their value, at least until I'd seen some early footage. My notion had been to try and sell as many as we could before the first film opened so we'd have an army of fresh readers who could say either "You should go read the books to find out what happens next" or "The books are better" no matter how things turned out. In the end, I believe few books/authors have ever had a film adaptation stay (mostly) that true to the source material on such a scale.

    I used some bonus money to buy a Gibson CS-356 that I cherish like it's my Precious. But I can't tell you what to read next (except maybe Unfinished Tales to catch up on Second Age stuff that will serve as the basis for the Amazon Prime TV series coming...).
     
  3. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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    I was extremely skeptical when I first heard that a live action theatrical release of the LotR trilogy was happening. But the movies really are beautifully made, the characters are captured well, and the story is faithfully represented. I've watched them almost as many times as I've read the books, and they continue to hold up well...perhaps ever improving upon repeated viewings.

    I feel like The Hobbit could've been one movie, however.
     
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  4. clayville

    clayville Tele-Meister

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    That captures how I felt too. A few months pre-release I got to see the 20 minute section of Fellowship from Balin's Tomb through the Balrog. I felt more or less obligated to report back in a letter to Christopher Tolkien what I'd seen. The Film Years were painful for him - he wished they'd never happened, felt the surrounding commercialization was destroying his father's creation. Thought I was a well-meaning Marketing hack a little too enthusiastic about sales and the burgeoning fanboy inter webs that were enriching the reading experience for thousands and thousands of folks worldwide -at least for his taste. I tried to explain that (again, pre-release) the mere fact of the films was helping us find literally millions of new readers for his father's books (with all the family's royalties going to charities), readers who were either experiencing the work for the first time or returning to it and finding deeper rewards - and experiencing the Real Deal firsthand. And then I tried to explain my own reaction to a film moment in Balin's Tomb where the big people of the Fellowship line up in front of the hobbits, weapons drawn to protect them from the onslaught about to come through the shattered door. In all the times I'd read that they were sworn to protect them, I'd never quite seen or felt it as I had in that moment... and in that way the films were bringing me fresh insight.

    That was probably a skinny little bridge too far for him. :rolleyes:

    I'm not fond of the Hobbit films (though I thought Martin Freeman was terrific). I understand why they were, but I wish those had never been made, personally. PJ took far more liberties with the story. Some would say he had to since much of the story is essentially a camping trip for kids, but I think most liberties he took (insertions, inventions) diminished the tale and didn't do him many favors.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
  5. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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    I think maybe a lot of folks don't have an understanding of how hungry Tolkien fans of a certain age (over 40) were for a proper telling of the LotR saga. Until the Jackson films, we had to make do with the super-condensed and somewhat cheaply thrown together Rankin-Bass cartoons and the well-meaning but overly ambitious Ralph Bakshi animated feature. (Neither of which the Tolkien estate was on board with). I was happy to finally have the big budget epics that the books truly warranted to help erase those from my memory.
     
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  6. middy

    middy Friend of Leo's

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    The Hobbit movies were awful.
    I’d like to see an unabridged and low key animated version someday. Something using a simple cel style on computers to keep the costs low.
     
  7. saltyseadog

    saltyseadog Tele-Holic

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  8. HoodieMcFoodie

    HoodieMcFoodie Telefied Ad Free Member

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    LotR is about 1200 pages, so three films were needed to do the story justice (even though they left things out).
    The Hobbit is only 300 or so pages, so how Peter Jackson justified making 3 films out of a 300 page novel is beyond me.
     
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  9. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

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    Artemus Gordon was my hero...
     
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  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Doctor of Teleocity

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    .

    Most of my favorite authors have been mentioned already. Tolkien's Hobbit/LOTR, Howard's Conan/Mars, and so on.
    I ran D&D games in the 80s. All of which lead to publishing my own novels in Science Fiction/Horror/Fantasy.
    Played occasional D&D campaigns in the last decade run by a friend who publishes video games.

    D&D has been gaining a lot of popularity in recent years. One of the inflection points back into general media presence was the success of the Netflix Stranger Things show which included the main characters playing a D&D-like game.

    If you've never played, there are starter sets.
    https://dnd.wizards.com/products/tabletop-games/rpg-products/rpg_starterset
    https://paizo.com/pathfinder ... is the "Open Source" gaming platform. Dig around on their site and they had downloadable free pdf rulebooks you can keep on a tablet to play or buy the hardcover bound physical books.
    Example sessions: Critical Role (run for many years, newer sessions will be more polished), D&D channel newer

    Video games which are similar: Elder Scrolls: Skyrim and The Witcher III

    The general media has also picked up gaming .. because the adults running Hollywood now were teen players back in the 70s/80s.
    There is even some guitar content in the last video.








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    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
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  11. sixstringbastard

    sixstringbastard Friend of Leo's

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    I'm a lifelong fan of Fantasy and Sci Fi lit. And, I've been playing tabletop RPG's since I was a young lad.

    I've been enjoying both Orlando Sanchez and Brad Magnarelli's books recently. Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden series is a big favorite of mine.
     
  12. redchapterjubilee

    redchapterjubilee TDPRI Member

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    D&D playing, Tolkien loving, Wheel of Time and Dragonlance reading fool right here.
     
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  13. Danjabellza

    Danjabellza Friend of Leo's

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    Actually; I looked up the suspected publishing date: Aug 20 2020... that’s come and gone. Also, apparently the editor has yet to see a single page of text... le sigh
     
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  14. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    +1, I was always more of Sci Fi fan but the Donaldson/Covenant books were very good. Smart and well written.
     
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  15. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Friend of Leo's Gold Supporter

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    LOL, I entered an online "blurb" (100 words exactly) contest with LOTR as the subject...and won 1st prize with a description of Ori writing his last words at Balin's tomb. I won a fountain pen and a blank LOTR journal...

    Having read LOTR first in my teens (1960s edition paperback), I struggled with "The Return Of The King". It wasn't until the movie that I actually understood it...and finally enjoyed it as much as the first two.
     
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  16. Echo79

    Echo79 TDPRI Member

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    I love Game of Thrones. The music for the tv series was awesome. Trying to learn a solo arrangement of the main theme; it hasn’t been going well lol.
     
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  17. thunderbyrd

    thunderbyrd Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    i am a huge fan of neil gaiman's Sandman comics. i love that story, but i don't care as much for the rest of his work.

    i wish someone could make a movie of Sandman, but i don't have much confidence they'd get it right.
     
  18. drmordo

    drmordo Tele-Afflicted

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    Netflix is currently filming a Sandman series. It's not clear to me whether it is an adaptation of the comic or just tales set within the Sandman mythos.
     
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  19. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    Bored of the Rings - Harvard Lampoon

    Seriously: Gormenghast trilogy - Mervyn Peake
     
  20. edvard

    edvard Friend of Leo's

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    As a former fantasy geek (not much time for such things nowadays, except for catching an episode of The Mandalorian every now and again.), I can recommend a few:

    "Liberty's World" by Lee Killough. Starts out Science Fiction, then goes straight Fantasy. Not a well-known book, and was probably published as a pulp time-killer sold at airports, but it's a very well-written story nonetheless.

    "Mage: The Hero Discovered" by Matt Wagner. Yeah, it's a comic series, but oof. I had the trade paperbacks, and loved them. The first part was a bit slow to get started, but towards the mid-end is a mind-blowing and emotional reveal (well, according to 15-year old me it really was) that still give me chills to this day thinking about it.
    I really hope someone makes a movie of this one.

    "Quag Keep" by Andre Norton.
    Not a great book, but it was pretty much the first ever book based on the then-new D&D concept, so if you're a sucker for the history of D&D, this one should be in your library.
     
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