Any exciting garden plans for this year?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by gobi_grey, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I just ordered two apple trees, a peach tree, four elderberry bushes and three grapes. Got my pepper seeds started last night and will be starting my cold weather crops shortly as well. Digging out and setting up all my grow lights and such. I'm slowly turning my whole yard into a food forest. I need to locate some cheap or even free wood chips because I am planning on mulching the entire yard with about 6 inches of woodchip mulch and slowly filling it in with garden/berry bushes/fruit trees. I've already got two apple trees, a pear tree and a couple decent berry patches along with several vegetable plots. It's been a lot of work and it will continue to be a lot of work but every year I have less grass to mow! Who else has some exciting garden plans or is just plain excited to be gardening soon?
     
  2. DannyBuffalo

    DannyBuffalo TDPRI Member

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    We just planted assorted fruit trees/bushes (elderberry, blueberry, serviceberry, paw paw, etc). I'm going to plant a gazpacho garden in the next week or two.

    The one I'm really excited about though, is the mushroom cultivation class at the end of the month and the Pine and poplar trees that are getting taken down a couple of weeks after that.
     
  3. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    I inoculated some oak logs last spring with chicken of the woods, hen of the woods and shiitake. I haven't taken any classes but that would be really helpful! Hoping they produce this year.
     
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  4. don71

    don71 Tele-Afflicted

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    I get excited about garden season. My brother started all his in the green house a couple of weeks ago. Potatoes are in the earth.

    I do a hobby patch=really small garden. About 12X20. A row of potatoes, onions and room for bell peppers and tomatoes. A couple of hot chilie's too.
    Simple.

    You guys in Iowa are a couple or three weeks behind us, in growing season. So, I think you're on schedule..to at least be excited about it. Good Growing to ya!
     
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  5. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I used to grow vegetables going back to the mid '60s when I did the whole garden from tilling with a pitchfork to planting and weeding and eating from the vine.
    Now that I moved back to the same 1/3 acre plot I'm pretty much sticking with perennial flowers, partly because my food gardening has had poor success, and partly because it nourishes my and particularly my artist wife's soul.

    For this season I may be adding some unusual giant iris from some ocean washout at work where I'm the gardener, if the owner who doesn't like iris says to not replant the tubers I rescued from the sea.
     
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  6. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Here’s an arbor like thing I built at work and grew/ trained these flowers on, and brought the frost killed roots home to try to bring back in spring. At the job they need greenhouse started so don’t want the old plants.

    Image1521668003.274538.jpg

    Maybe I can find pics of the huge iris.
    These guys are more than three feet tall and blooms are almost 6" wide.
    Image1521668152.185786.jpg
     
  7. rich815

    rich815 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Very cool plans.

    I live in a 3-story condo loft and have a decent sized rooftop garden with redwood planter boxes and clay pots. Will grow some strawberries this year again, along with 3-4 varieties of mint (chocolate, apple, grapefruit) and a straight peppermint. Then some basil and oregano. Also some cherry tomato types, Sun Gold and Snow White, both so delicious right off the vine and popped into your mouth like grapes! Also will grow a number of different Salvia bushes since we have a load of hummingbirds around here and they love salvia flowers. Also have a slew of cacti plants lining one wall. When those flower watch out! Gorgeous stuff. All finished off with some morning glory vines scattered about. Very excited for spring!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
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  8. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Almost forgot the other reason I now like growing flowers after decades of pretty much snubbing their cultivation.
    Wildlife likes them, and may even need them.
    This guy was in rough shape when he arrived at my table!
    Image1521669340.552184.jpg

    At times there are a dozen monarchs flying around me at work, or groups of dive bombing hummingbirds.
     
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  9. DannyBuffalo

    DannyBuffalo TDPRI Member

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    I'm taking the class at Mushroom Mountain in Greenville, SC. I'm currently reading Organic Mushroom Farming and Mycoremediation by Tradd Cotter (he's also leading the class) to get up to speed.

    I'll probably start with shiitake and oyster since they're supposed to be good for beginners.
     
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  10. Johnson johnson

    Johnson johnson Tele-Holic

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    I've been clearing trees for a while to get enough sun, I just got this built, needs some chicken wire (around the outside) and a gate for the entrance. We have lots of critters... IMG_20180304_132207.jpg
     
  11. hollowman

    hollowman Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    just planted 100 feet of purple and red potato rows; onions, bulb and starts; kale and broccoli starts; seed bed of lettuce! and we got rain the next day, which was even better. It's been a bone dry winter here in KC area
     
  12. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Try calling some tree removal companies.
    While they may have a use for the chips from the chipper that go right into the truck, they have a problem with chips from the stump grinder, because of the labor to scoop them up, so they generally leave them for the homeowner to deal with. Might be able to take a truckload in exchange for cleaning up the pile.
     
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  13. tery

    tery Doctor of Teleocity

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    I am going to plant a Lily of the Valley & a Blue Hosta .
     
  14. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    That's a cool setup, haven't seen one quite like that before!
    Actually one thing that keeps me from growing vegetables is the cost of watering.
    It easily runs up into hundreds of $ a month to keep a crop well watered.
    A good raised bed with plastic liner would conserve a good amount of water.
    Is this one lined?
    Or water cost isn't much of an issue for you?
     
  15. Johnson johnson

    Johnson johnson Tele-Holic

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    I've got about 2 inches of decent topsoil and then it's clay, very dense (i.e. I ain't tilling that business) clay. I've been generating a lot of good soil thru composting and leaf piling and a bunch of it went in here.
    Regarding water: I'm out in the country, I've got a well I have to maintain but no water bill. Put about $1400 into the well last year though...:(
     
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  16. rich815

    rich815 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I’ve grown oyster mushrooms! Really easy. Harvested in the morning before breakfast and then sautéed in butter and a little garlic then pour in the eggs and scramble it all together! Delish!
     
  17. Sconnie

    Sconnie Tele-Afflicted

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    You guys are so lucky. I'm still renting and the lawn of this house was dead when I moved in. Saves on water I guess ;)

    It's still perfectly good for some games of bag-o's and KanJam, so I'm excited to drink beers and play bag-o's and KanJam!
     
  18. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Friend of Leo's

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    Those are diplodenia or a red mandavilla. Almost the same. Not sure if it will come back from roots? We always kept starter plants and took cuttings in the greenhouses.
     
  19. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

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    How about a rain barrel? I was able to get a barrel for 10 bucks from a local factory. Just have to make sure it's food grade. Mine just had some caramelized corn syrup in it. I'll be hooking up a second one and maybe a third one this year. They help out a lot. It's nice to be able to go out and dip free water. Otherwise it shoots up your water bill and in my town your sewer bill goes up with water usage too.
     
  20. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yeah mandevilla, always forget names and guests keep asking me deep gardening questions like "what's that?".

    Here in Maine the mandevilla will come back if you bring the roots in and keep them around 50 with a little light.
    These took a pretty hard frost though, the first one actually froze pipes and one building had no water in the November morning!
     
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