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Any CNC shops that will route to your designs?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Peltogyne, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    So, I've made some CAD models of things I would like to eventually build. Fender style construction, nothing too crazy. I no longer have a shop to build from scratch and was wondering if there are any CNC shops that would work with my designs?

    There are many 3D printing places that you can send a file, get a quote and then they print it for you. Has anyone found or used anything like this for CNC guitar building?

    Or if anyone has a CNC and wants to hire out or maybe trade I'd be interested in hearing about it. I'd love to find someone in the S.F. bay area who has a CNC in their garage and wants to build a few guitars as a hobbyist.

    I've seen facilities where you can join and pay a monthly fee and use their machines after taking their classes but that's not too appealing.

    Anything like this out there?
     
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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There is a guitar building section at the cnczone. I'd post the question there. A few guys cnc here, but I guess you'd have to wait for a reaction from them or PM them directly. I did a body once for a cnczone guy with the same request and it just wasn't cost effective for me with my little machine.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2017
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  3. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    cnczone.com? Thanks, I'll look into that.
     
  4. Dunkerhook

    Dunkerhook Tele-Meister

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    The maker space near me has a large CNC. Look around; you may find a machine you can use yourself.
     
  5. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    We do have maker space or similar around here. But the monthly fee is quite high and I'd have to take classes to train on their machines, and then I wouldn't really know too much about them or have any experience.

    I did find a few names on the cnczone.com and I need to write them. I'm hoping if someone is setup already to do guitars I could adjust my designs to their workflow and get out reasonably cheap. At least as cheap as joining maker space.

    The bodies I know I could laser cut a template and pull it off with a router out back but the neck would be tougher.
     
  6. Telecentric

    Telecentric Tele-Holic

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    Another possibility would be to see if any local guitar makers would do it for you.

    I don't know whether Doug would or wouldn't, but Kauer Guitars in Elk Grove isn't that far away. Doesn't hurt to ask, does it? He started out small too.

    https://www.kauerguitars.com/

    *no affiliation, just love his work and know he's a good guy.*
     
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  7. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    I think you will find that your idea of reasonably cheap and the owner of a CNC will differ. Doing a one off is a lot of work. For me It usually involves at least one test run. Then there is always the possibility of an error and that means more wood (at who's expense?). So, in the end it would likely cost you as much as a custom body and neck from somewhere like warmoth. so, if that is in your definition of reasonably cheap you may have a chance.

    But with all that, I hope it works out for you.

    One route would be to check out the maker space and find someone there who uses the cnc and see if they would be interested.
     
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  8. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    Oh yes, I'm aware of the expense of doing a one off. And that's reasonable of course. Warmoth prices are about what I'd expect for something right off the CNC without any clean up. 3D printing prices are all over the map and I'd expect the same for CNC.

    I went and searched the local makerspaces again and stumbled onto a non profit one near me with a 5' x 6' CNC from a guitar maker and they are only $80 a month! This is much cheaper than the $500 or so a month I remember from my last searches from a while back. They also seem to use Fusion 360 which is what I'm designing in. https://www.acemonstertoys.org/cnc-router/

    They have a class on Monday I'm going to check out. Hopefully I'll have some build threads soon. This is looking too perfect!

    This is what I have in mind, basically an evolution of the Fender Jazz to my tastes. A 32" scale and a body downsized to match. A few changes, zero fret, tiltback small headstock, but without straying too far from tradition.

    MJ_05_2017-Oct-08_09-59-38AM-000_CustomizedView15739203445_png.jpg
     
  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Take this for what it is worth, but one thing I'd suggest you do is break everything down into modular sections in the Gcode. That way if you find you have to modify things, you don't have to redo the whole program. I stick an M0 in there after every main section. Most everything is 2.5 D except for the neck shaft carve,transitions, and body contours. I find that doing a perimeter cut first results in a cleaner edge than not when doing the body and neck I've found it is faster to do the edge radius on a router table with better results.


    Modular sections also allow for customization, like adding different pickup routs, etc.
     
  10. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    I like that three pickup design ;)

    A few years back I routed a used 4 string Washburn P-bass I got cheap with two additional J pickups (although putting them closer to the neck and bridge than your sketch for deeper bass and higher mids/highs) and added a regular Strat 5-way switch. It's a lot of fun with the additional tones not typically available on a bass.

    .
     
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  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just an M0? Or separate little programs for each group of mini-tasks? Are you able to skip ahead over sections (like different pickup routes all coded)?

    I have a few runs where something happens (like the power gets cycled in the building, or the other thousand things that happen) and re-running a long program is problematic on its own to run through the whole front completed code just to get to the point it needs to start cutting again.

    You've mentioned this modular code strategy several times ... perhaps a thread on modular code how-to like you have done for neck building? Quite a few of us are messing around with CNCs and it's been too much messing around for me than I'd like.

    .
     
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  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Yeah, an M0 keeps the router running in the retracted position that occurred as a result of the last module. It requires a push of the start button, but keeps the whole program in a linear fashion. At the end of each section, I can just scroll down to the next section I want to do and hit the "set next line" button. I divide modular sections by a series of (xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx) to help see the divisions. This is Mach3 were talking about. I can't speak for other programs other then universal gcode sender, which to me is like MS notepad vs Word in terms of usefulness.


    Modular sections allow you to change neck shaft shapes easily by cutting and pasting the gcode for that shape. Everything else can stay the same.

    In bodies, you can mix and match all the variables that way.


    As far as my neck evolution:


    I joint my neck blank before taping it down to my router. I run the perimeter cut program with a 1/4" bit since I'm cutting on an angle and only have about .25 of space left of useful cut area. I also "drill" the tuner holes at this point since I'm using a 1/4 bit.

    Next I change over to a 1/2" roundnose and do the neck carve and transitions. I do X and Y roughing, but Y only finish cutting.

    Another bit change to 7/32" straight and I'll do the skunk stripe rout.

    The neck blank then has to be flipped over and I rout the fretboard radius with about a 1/16-1/10" stepover.

    A bit change to a dremel cone bit scribes the fret slot positions to match the radius.

    A bit change to a 1/8 straight cuts the nut slot and taper of the fretboard and dot holes.

    A position change of the neck to do the peghead transition back with the roundnose. I only have 25" on my longest axis and a neck it about 26.5 " long.


    This all takes about 1.5 hours. I'm thinking about going to stronger motors and that could cut the time down a lot and allow me more finer passes on the finish cuts.

    At that point I'm ready to saw the slots and drill the holes for the truss rod and finish it up.

    If I ever take the thing apart and replace the bearings, I may try the fret slot routing too.

    Right now there is a bit too much slop...mostly due to crashes.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2017
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  13. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I just add and remove tool paths as I see fit when I cnc a body or neck , I can run all the tool paths together as one file with of course tool changes where required , or I can run the tool paths one at a time , ie , neck pocket , control cavity , pup routes , body profiles , etc . I do most as 2D cuts and where needed I can add in 3D cuts like fb radius , neck profile , forearm cut , belly cut etc . The difference in machining time on a standard tele body doing 2D cuts vs 3D would be more than likely hours , 3D being the longer run time . With most of today's CAM programs there's not much code you need to know , that's not to say that knowing code is not helpful , it is very helpful , but I don't think its necessary to be successful depending on what CAM program you use .
     
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  14. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

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    I run all my code in separate files. so, at the end of each file I load the next one. But, I usually name them starting with a number them put them in a folder named for the overall operation. Say something like "Lefty_Tele_body" FOR the folder. I usually also add tool info to the gcode file name.
     
  15. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, that's all helpful.

    I just saw my local makerspace tonight and watched the CAM class. I think I've completely changed my mind of farming this out and now want to do it myself. :)

    I'm loving Fusion360 and have done the tutorials for the CAM part and did the little project from tonights class that we then watched be cut.

    F360 can do separate tool paths for all the different cuts and then it's just a button push to generate new G code for the machine I'll be using so that will make going modular simple. I can rearrange the paths order of execution by simply dragging them. This is getting exciting.

    Yeah, router table for the radius makes sense. I was wondering about that.
     
  16. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks, the wiring I have in mind is a bit insane. It's passive, think of just the 2 Jazz pickups and a standard Vol, Pan, Tone setup. Normal so far.

    Now the middle dual coil comes into play with the other 2 small knobs. Each small knob is a blend for it's side of the humbucker and neighboring J pickup. With both small blends rotated out it's a J bass. Turn both all the way in it's a single humbucker bass in about the MM Stingray position.

    Then you can start blending each J and humbucker half and use the big blend to mix those. I think of it as a 4 coil bass counting J1 H1 H2 J2. I can get all combos of 1, 2, 3, or 4 coils and many blends in between.

    It's ridiculously hyper complex but also super simple if you ignore the small blends. You can wire 2 Humbuckers the same way and it's visually simpler.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2017
  17. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    Again, very helpful, these are many of the questions I didn't ask yet but was about to.

    I only know the one program for CAD but look at Fusion360 (it's free if your biz makes less than $100k) it did post processing for Mach3 is seconds and switching out modules is simple as you can keep jumping back to CAD or CAM workspaces to tweak as needed. I added some rounding to our tutorial model in the 2D sketch after the paths were generated and it updated them all the way down the pipeline in the CAM section with one click. They did point out they were having some G Code issues going to Mach3 but turning off G28 fixes it.
     
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  18. dhempy

    dhempy TDPRI Member

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    Hey there Peltogyne: I got lucky and found an adult education class that teaches manufacturing and as it turns out, their project is to build a guitar. The shop had a beautiful CNC router and videos to help learn the CNC. Look around in Craigslist (that's where I found my class) and check your local school district(s) for their adult education offerings.

    Dan

    BTW, the class I took used Fusion360 as well.
     
  19. Peltogyne

    Peltogyne Friend of Leo's

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    Hi Dan, a class my friend took in So Cal is what sparked off my latest quest. They also did a guitar. But the class looked real slow and expensive and not very flexible. I just clicked your location, that's where the class is! Small world huh?

    I'm real excited about this particular Makerspace in Emeryville. I hope it, and myself, live up to my expectations.
     
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