Anti-Virus for Mac

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by FrontPU, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. DekeDog

    DekeDog Tele-Holic

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    I know I'm gonna get flack for this, but I use Kaspersky on my Mac. I realize Kaspersky is Russian, but it is highly rated consistently, it seems to work well, and I have not noticed much, if any, reduction in speed. In the three years I've used it, it has detected and successfully removed two Trojan viruses. I'm told Macs are not as impervious to viruses as they once were.
     
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  2. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Nononono, don’t use MacKeeper or CleanMyMac. They do more harm than solving any problems.

    Try Malwarebytes first.
     
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  3. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Never used any malware ever and I have been a MAC user since well before day 1.

    Now, an entirely different story and experiences with my step daughters and their PCs?:twisted::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::cry:
     
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  4. Pasta Player

    Pasta Player Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Macs here since their beginning.
    Never had a virus in all of these years... but just recently - my first malware attack.
    Malwarebytes is the way to go and currently recommended by Apple.

    AND I completely agree with this:
    "Nononono, don’t use MacKeeper or CleanMyMac".
     
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  5. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    There are reasons to have endpoint protection on a Mac and DNS based security is worth considering for any client/personal type computer. I don't want to pick fights here but as an enterprise IT admin know this topic well and disagree with some things said here.

    I have used, tested and studied a few Mac endpoint security solutions. What I use personally and in the enterprise have a tie. Personally I get a Bitdefender multiple license and in the enterprise Cisco AMP in endpoints and SDWAN. Bitdefender is one of a few vendors or components supplied that make up AMP for endpoints. The Cisco AMP product is probably inappropriate unless someone here is a business owner or in IT with enough users for it to make sense.

    It should be really easy to do some homework to find Bitdefender is fast, effective and not problematic. The most common way I see incidents after someone getting spoofed is the anti-virus software will find your Mac and often mail holds a malicious file really destined for Windows but you should still do the world a favor and not let it spread.

    You should also consider endpoint security because many incidents are file-borne. Common file types for Mac and Windows users are attack vectors. I also consider using endpoint security protection a lot like public health measures most of us do.

    The more I think about this is I'd answer no if it was asked as must use anti-virus but yes to should. Parts of why I do are my family members and part is because I can and do BYOD (bring your own device) in my job.
     
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  6. NilsZippo

    NilsZippo TDPRI Member

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    Ditto on that.

    As someone who’s worked in Tech and IT for the past 2 decades, that stuff comes easy to me and others with a strong tech background. Unfortunately, there are still many folks not running their own personal servers at home or routing through managed Cisco switches and routers. I do only because I can and I got sick and tired of paying for cloud storage subscription fees, easier to set up my own. I will say I’ve worked with all 3 major OS’s, always have. We run all 3 on a variety of computers in our household purely based on user prefs. YES, Macs are far less prone to contracting malware BUT they are NOT immune - just FACT. Specifically, Macs are more prone to drive by browsing malware of the scripting nature (including embedded JS keyloggers), BUT stay away from “questionable” websites and you should be fine. The reality is that ALL 3 operating systems (Linux, MacOS, Windows) are vulnerable to spyware - that’s just another FACT. Now, is spyware a virus? Technically, no. But when you consider what spyware is capable of doing through embedded cookies and cross scripting AND then what can be data-mined from the remnants they leave behind on every server hosting the websites you visit - well, you’d be wise to consider spyware something you should clean from your computer on a regular daily basis (I say this because, I now do big data mining as a consultant). Finally, if you want to ensure all such crap is cleaned on a regular basis using an anti malware or anti virus software is a good way of automating such a process EVEN on a Mac. This is because such applications typically remove most spyware, as well these days - but NOT 100%, nothing is 100%. Intego is a decent paid product. Sophos AV for personal use is a better choice and is free. Lastly, ALWAYS use the newest version of all browsers, because they all now offer additional built-in cross scripting prevention as well as real-time malicious website validation services.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
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  7. jimash

    jimash Friend of Leo's

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    I'm a Mac guy. I use Malwarebytes. And ClamAV for virus'.
     
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  8. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    nope it isn't mackeeper which I find to be annoying.
     
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  9. Lefty Addams

    Lefty Addams Tele-Afflicted

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    Been using Macs for 26 years now and until recently, never needed anything like that.

    But once you have been hit with a trojan horse or worse, you get wise believe me. For malware and virus, AVG Antivirus is a good thing.
     
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  10. FrontPU

    FrontPU Tele-Holic

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    Thank you guys for the reply to clear up my confusion, yes I knew the bad reputation of MacKeeper.
     
  11. FrontPU

    FrontPU Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the suggestion, I appreciate. I have used Sophos (free ver.) for 10 yrs and it found/got rid of 3 or 4 things like malware (no virus) so far. So I personally would like to keep using an anti-virus stuff in my mac after this, too.
     
  12. FrontPU

    FrontPU Tele-Holic

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    Oh "by Apple" sounds persuasive!:cool:
    And Malwarebytes seems to be popular here and among my neighbors...
    Thank you.
     
  13. FrontPU

    FrontPU Tele-Holic

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    Thank you guys for your valuable time to write this much, those seem like perfect reading matters for me...
    So what "AMP" stands for?
    Yeah, I had been a happy user of Sophos before encountering the no update confirmation email from them, so thought it would be a good chance to try new thing.
    Once again thank you guys, I appreciate.
     
  14. FrontPU

    FrontPU Tele-Holic

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    I don't blame you for using Russian products!:D
    But didn't know the name and it was highly rated... every ranking might show different ballot results and rankers.
    I agree with you on the last sentence.
     
  15. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    AMP stands for advanced malware protection and Cisco uses that product/marketing name across products. Feature sets within product families and the name of the product for what most think of as anti-virus software. I help someone in a small office and recently learned there's a min 25 seat buy in.

    My point for bringing it up is one of their components for what most consider AV software is supplied by Bitdefender. I suggested doing some homework because people can have really strong tendencies from brand loyalty so figured anyone looking would find it's a good Mac product.

    The component that was originally the OpenDNS is available as Umbrella and with free home versions.

    I know there are price and skills limitations for our personal systems. My mix of stuff is I use a company issued Surface (Microsoft) and my Macs. I have my own systems protected when they're on others' networks. My ways to manage the costs are the free versions, modestly priced Bitdefender and I'm very happy with Ubiquiti meshed WiFi and firewall at home.

    Ubiquiti is in the enterprise business and has a SOHO (small office, home office) product line called Amplifi. I chose it over other popular products for a home because of good radio performance and fellow network admins who follow it noticing a good record for security patches and updates. For those not wanting to use or trust cloud products they have a really easy schema and options for getting back to your own house.
     
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  16. AAT65

    AAT65 Friend of Leo's

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  17. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I would go with Apple's advice ... You pay a premium to buy their OS and the virus invulnerability is one of the good reasons to do so ...
     
  18. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    In almost all cases Apple does not generally suggest or advise 3rd party software. The exceptions or perceived exceptions are some of their retail partnerships and some of the business team partnerships and enterprise scenarios where they don't make or publish some products. At times people misinterpret content from their discussion forums or from an Apple retail employee.

    Also, they do not sell their OS anymore. Where you pay a premium is pretty much same as I do with other professional purchases I make. First tier IT products are generally same or similar more expensive components and superior service and support for post-sale issues. Examples would be very similar costs for the Apple, Microsoft Surface, HP Elite & Dell workstation or pro class stuff we buy.

    I'm a power user for Apple's continuity and handoff features with a phone. You could call that paying a premium. Even then we buy Android and Apple business tier stuff with the CFO analyzing it all. He's far from an Apple fan boy but continues authorizing the purchases based on it being cost effective and the stuff working well. Many home users do not need the support, quality or total life cycle cost we seek but they can benefit from it.

    I don't have a problem if a Mac user keeps things up to date and does sagacious Internet use. I'll still be using endpoint protection on Macs if only as a public service. Why not quarantine and delete malicious files as a perfect example.

    Finally, there is no invulnerability. I have to watch that for Windows, Macs, mobile OS, Linux, VMware, Nutanix and IOT. Just components and software applications used across platforms create vulnerabilities that have to be patched. Metadata in common file types carry risk.

    At best I'll say a modern up to date setup is much less vulnerable. By that I mean don't use obsolete hardware or operating systems and keep them patched.
     
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  19. sudogeek

    sudogeek Tele-Meister

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    I’ve used Macs since the Apple ][ - well, not technically a Mac, but I did have a Mac SE running system 6 until it recently died!

    Anyway, my recommendations:
    1. Block ads and malware at the DNS level. I use a small fanless low power box from PCEngines (you can use a Raspberry Pi) to run a variant of PiHole. This is a local DNS server which blocks ads and the vast majority of malware/spyware infected sites. It also speeds up your browsing.
    2. A simpler alternative is to change your DNS server to AdGuardDNS (176.103.130.130, .131, .132, or .134) or AlternateDNS (23.253.163.53 and 198.100.242.72) which provide ad blocking, blocking malicious sites, and they keep their blacklists up to date so you don’t have to. This also prevents your ISP, Google, etc. from snooping on your web browsing activity.
    3. Always run as an unprivileged user (see post above) not as admin user.
    4. Keep your browser up to date and use a script blocker - which will prevent many adware/spyware/malware issues. I recommend Firefox with uBlock Origin.
    5. Practice safe browsing:
    - Use a script blocker and ad blocker
    - Avoid warez, pr0n, etc.
    - Don’t connect to financial sites if you’re on a public or untrusted wifi network.
    - HTTPS everywhere
    6. Consider a separate secure device or at least another user on your Mac which is only used for financial sites and transactions.
    7. Run a scan periodically, like Malwarebytes, if your computer or browser is wonky, if you want, or for entertainment. I do not use an AV program on my Mac.
    8. Pop ups, unwanted ads, etc. usually are due to browser, not system, exploits. These can usually be nuked by clearing your browser cache and history.
    9. Email is also a common vector of exploits. Pay attention to email security, like:
    - use an email provider that does scanning for spam, malware, etc.
    - don’t open or even preview email from unknown senders
    - block images in email
    - consider using a whitelist
    - never click links in email; they seldom go to the site they are labeled as.
    10. An iPad is even less likely to be infected than a Mac due to the way application data is isolated between apps. Consider this for random web browsing. OTOH, script blockers are not available.
    11. Consider using an even more low profile OS for secure connections. I use OpenBSD on one laptop which I use to connect to financial institutions. Some security focused Linux distributions are also available.
    12. Consider using full disk encryption. Definitely do this on your phone.

    There is really no security panacea. The three-letter-agencies have tools that antivirus cannot detect or stop - and many have been leaked.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2019
  20. fendrguitplayr

    fendrguitplayr Doctor of Teleocity

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    I've been using an iMac since 2011 and have never used or needed an AV program. Maybe I'm just lucky...
     
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