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Another Trans(semi-opaque) Finish

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by ThaLowEndTheory, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

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    Well here's another one. I thought I'd share my process for using solid colors to make a trans finish(or semi-opaque if you are stickler). I though maybe a couple of guys would benefit from this. This is how I do it when I don't have acces to my spray equipment. It's not a detailed thread, but you should be able to get the idea. Subject color is Reranch Coral being sprayed over dark grainfilled ash. Subject guitar is my "Supa Fly" Squier strat. It was already finished in clear lacquer so I just sprayed over that.

    Equipment needed:
    1 Preval(or similar unit)
    1 smal funnel
    1 can of color
    1 can of clear

    I mix this 2 parts clear:1 part color. You can mix it however transparent you need it. I collect the color in the jar by spraying into the side of the funnel at an angle to reduce blowback. I usually have some clear for mixing in a seperate container, but in this case I only had a little bit and needed to collect more. So I collect the clear in the same method. Take the same precautions that you always do while doing this. Wear the appropriate mask and so forth. I hear lots of people complain about prevals, but for me they are perfect for this. Once it's all collected put the lid on the jar and shake it up. Open the jar to release some of the trapped gas. I do this several times until I start to see fewer bubbles.

    Now you are ready to spray. First I lay do a fairly wet coat of clear, then I immediately move to color while the clear is still wet. I spray the color on the dry side, often from 2 feet away or more. Really I spray toward the body, and let gravity do the rest while rotating the body. The color goes down nice and even despite the preval due to the mix. Spray until you reach the level of coverage you are looking for. I've been able to get really consistent color by using this process. It really does away with that spotty look you can sometimes get. It also gives you more room for error. I can spray freely without worrying about covering the grain. I only used half of the jar on this one, but I probably could've sprayed the rest without covering the grain. For alot of you this is nothing new, but I've had several questions about my process on various forums, so I thought I'd share it here as well.

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  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Great work, as always.

    I always note your decision to use dark dark grain filler, or at least the appearance of such.

    It certainly enables you to use much more color saturation without annihilating the grain pattern.

    I guess mine tend to be the opposite. I neutralize the strong grain pattern to make it more like alder, etc., then my toner coats are very very minimal - so easy to overshoot.

    I need to consider going a little darker, and see what happens.
     
  3. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

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    For lighter colors like MK or Blonde, I prefer I light brown filler. Close to the natural color of the grain. With the pastels, I do prefer dark brown, or even black for the exact reasons you mentioned. You can get the true look of the color, and the grain is still apparent.
     
  4. dbeeman

    dbeeman TDPRI Member

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    Just in time for Halloween
     
  5. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    You have such an incredible knack for uncovering nice looking wood under the skins of import guitars.

    But the truth is, once the wood gets shipped to them, what DO we expect them to do with it, send it back to a Custom luthier in the USA? I don't think so.

    Meanwhile, other guys try to do the same and they find yechh!!
     
  6. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

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    Yea, I've had some good luck. I do look at the bodies before I buy them. Often you can see the seams telegraphing through the poly. I look for 2 or 3 piece bodies. Also look I look for figuring in the necks. Sometimes you can only barely see it through the poly. Then some good old tru oil makes it pop. Here's another I found recently at a pawn shop for $40.

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  7. fernando

    fernando Tele-Afflicted

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    you have x ray vision!?
     
  8. ThaLowEndTheory

    ThaLowEndTheory Tele-Meister

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    Completed pics. I used trans tint "honey amber" dye and tru oil on the neck. Just need to set her up now.

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  9. Hollmanp90

    Hollmanp90 Tele-Afflicted

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    Very nice.....That neck is very sweet also....I'm diggin' the tru-oil and toner combo.

    Good stuff as always T.L.E.T. !!!
     
  10. Squier Buyer

    Squier Buyer Tele-Meister

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    Transparent, translucent, opaque.

    -"Ain't no semi-boneless ham....."-George Carlin. RIP
     
  11. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    :D


    It takes patience and an ability to concentrate; which is a commodity in short supply when surrounded by strings instruments and amps, I find.

    Some guys flat out have better vision or better honed skills of observation.

    I should be able to do what ThaLowEndTheory is doing, but honestly (I'm sure ya'll are tired of hearing this) many many electrics in Katrinaland have other "issues" (water damage or impacts/crushing) and I end up putting the used guitar back on the hook.
     
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