1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Ancient egypt books ?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by johnny k, Oct 23, 2020.

  1. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,802
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location:
    France
    I would like to know more about ancient egpyt, a bit of history, of bit of the religious aspect, a book that would cover a bit of everything.
    Some folks here might know a bit about it, since you guys are interested in a bit of everything.
    Thank you !
     
  2. Toast

    Toast Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,197
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2019
    Location:
    Scootchin' Over
    I don't have a book recommendation, but this documentary will give you a lot of insight into ancient Egypt.

     
    johnny k likes this.
  3. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    10,074
    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2014
    Location:
    UK
    The BBC Egypt mini series is very good as an intro...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egypt_(TV_series)

    I will also say Assassin's Creed Origins has a ‘museum mode’ and interesting fact stuff alongside the game. :)

    ‘Travels in Egypt and Nubia’ is Belozoni’s book about his work there. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00LD7OMV2/ref=dp-kindle-redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1

    We also have Howard Carter’s own book on Tutankhamum dig which is full of all the original pictures from the excavation.

    Not read these but would seem a good list: https://fivebooks.com/best-books/ancient-egypt-toby-wilkinson/

    Both the Louvre and British Museum websites have lots of info and links and probably notes on other accessible books to get into the culture/detail side.

    The Petrie museum at University College London https://www.ucl.ac.uk/culture/petrie-museum and the Egyptology museum in Swansea are more research oriented.

    You might start here for specific papers / references

    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/museums-static/digitalegypt// or https://libguides.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/c.php?g=423060&p=4720874

    My daughter was very into it when younger but went for medicine in the end... but she learned to read hieroglyphs. I forget the book she used but it was a complete guide to it.

    my wife listens to podcasts https://www.egyptianhistorypodcast.com/

    https://www.historyextra.com/period...gypt-egyptians-pharaohs-pyramids-tutankhamun/
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
    Greggorios and johnny k like this.
  4. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,456
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    Besides the musea mentioned above, also check out the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.
     
    johnny k likes this.
  5. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,802
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location:
    France
    That is a good idea, but cairo is not so close. Except if i can do a virtual tour ?
     
  6. Greggorios

    Greggorios Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    3,405
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Location:
    NY
    I've listened/watched this "Great Courses" DVD by a very engaging NY college professor. It's very good and more important is recommended by my wife who is Global Studies teacher. (It's also available as audio only on Audible but the full course on DVD or digital file has a lot of good graphics.) I don't have any affiliation with publisher, The Teaching Co.

    The book below I have not read but I remembered good reviews of it.

    https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/history-of-ancient-egypt.html

    upload_2020-10-23_8-23-51.png



    upload_2020-10-23_8-23-5.png
     
    johnny k and uriah1 like this.
  7. uriah1

    uriah1 Telefied Gold Supporter

    Posts:
    22,562
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2011
    Location:
    Around
    There are many educational books out there too that walk through all the dynasties.
    I remember in anthropology and archaeology we went through many that
    dive into it at great length, more than general public type.
     
    johnny k and Greggorios like this.
  8. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    7,139
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Location:
    London
    johnny k and Greggorios like this.
  9. theprofessor

    theprofessor Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,402
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Location:
    Chattanooga, TN
    I am not an Egyptologist, but I did take Egyptian in graduate school. Not enough to be good at it, though! The Oxford Very Short Introductions series is generally great. I'd start with the one on Ancient Egypt by Ian Shaw. There is also one on Egyptian Myth by Geraldine Pinch. And maybe others, too. For getting in on the ground floor, those books can't be beat. For reading Egyptian literature, Miriam Lichtheim's three-volume Ancient Egyptian Literature is still a classic. For an introductory-level overview of ancient Near Eastern religion in general (which includes Egypt, according to his definition), I highly recommend Daniel Snell's Religions of the Ancient Near East.
     
    johnny k likes this.
  10. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,802
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location:
    France
    Thanks a lot. Yeah, i am a newbie on that subject, if i can keep it simple with an easy read, i would enjoy it more.

    edit book of the dead is 200 chapters. I don't think it is going to come in paper back.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
  11. theprofessor

    theprofessor Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,402
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Location:
    Chattanooga, TN
    I should add that the suggestion of others about virtual tours of artifacts or museums is a great idea. When focusing on ancient cultures, it is still all too common only to look at literature and to give less attention to art, architecture, and iconography. I am a text guy, so I am often guilty of that. Many museums now have virtual tour stuff, and the quality of the photography is normally outstanding. I don't know if the Cairo Museum does, but recall that most of the major ancient Near Eastern artifacts reside in Western Europe, thanks to the colonial efforts of the French, Germans, and English. So the Louvre, the Neues Museum in Berlin, and the British Museum are fantastic places to see Egyptian artifacts, whether in person or virtually. I do not play video games, but I think that the Assassin's Creed suggestion above is seriously legit. It may get you into the feel of the world on the ground. I understand it was very well researched and well done.
     
    johnny k likes this.
  12. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    9,715
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    .

    The most interesting things you'll find about Egypt are in youtube videos that have not made it into books.
    Classical archeologists are struggling with many of the newer findings and how to keep the old narratives in place but there are many new questions around the findings.

    Many of the marvels attributed to Ancient Egypt are more and more likely constructions the Egyptians/others found in place and repurposed.Erosion around the Sphinx, alignments of the Sphinx and pyramids to stars and compass points better match the time period well before the Egyptians.

    This is a general summary, easy to find more like this in greater depth of the inconsistencies and questions about the classical historical archaeology understanding.






    .
     
    Piggy Stu and johnny k like this.
  13. buster poser

    buster poser Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

    Posts:
    1,467
    Joined:
    May 1, 2018
    Location:
    Tewa Land NM
    Can't help you on Egypt. Ancient Sumerian books now...

    [​IMG]

    I know a guy.

    [​IMG]
     
    johnny k likes this.
  14. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,456
    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Location:
    Home
    i would check their website
     
    johnny k likes this.
  15. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,802
    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Location:
    France
    koen likes this.
  16. SbS

    SbS Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    522
    Joined:
    May 29, 2020
    Location:
    Finland
    One of our greates writers, Mika Waltari, wrote a novel: The Egyptian (Sinuhe). Waltari never visited in Egypt, but book is praised being quite accurate. He studied topic a lot. Although there are some parts that are not exactly from that period in real history. Artistic freedom..

    I've never read the English version, but it's quite highly regarded internationally too. So fiction, but historical frame and landscape is said being very accurate. Also, really good book.

    The_egyptian_finnish.jpg sinuhe-the-egyptian.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2020
    johnny k likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.