Analog Solid State Amps With Great OD / Dirty Channels

11 Gauge

Doctor of Teleocity
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In the latest iteration of the Bandit Peavey include a three-position damping switch which alters the response from loose to tight. I prefer a tight response in my amps, and sold a Blues Cube because it felt 'slow', if that makes any sense?
View attachment 1011953
Makes sense to me.

I think that what I like about Quilter amps is that while they have lower damping than your typical SS power amp, it seems like it's probably not as low as what you have with the typical tube power amp, which IME particularly can have issues with very percussive picking or strumming on the 5th and 6th strings, especially at higher volumes.

OTOH, something like my Boss Katana 50 (MkI) seems to be a bit too tight, w/o the sufficient amount of give/bounce at the speaker, which tells me that the damping is probably a bit higher. I think it's also why that amp uses a 4 ohm speaker, instead of the typical 8 or 16 ohm that you'll typically find in a lot of 1X12 tube combos.
 

AndrewG

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Makes sense to me.

I think that what I like about Quilter amps is that while they have lower damping than your typical SS power amp, it seems like it's probably not as low as what you have with the typical tube power amp, which IME particularly can have issues with very percussive picking or strumming on the 5th and 6th strings, especially at higher volumes.

OTOH, something like my Boss Katana 50 (MkI) seems to be a bit too tight, w/o the sufficient amount of give/bounce at the speaker, which tells me that the damping is probably a bit higher. I think it's also why that amp uses a 4 ohm speaker, instead of the typical 8 or 16 ohm that you'll typically find in a lot of 1X12 tube combos.
I never played through a Quilter; they're uncommon over here-but are on my 'must try' list; the 50W Aviator Cub looks good to me.
 

JDB2

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This may be covered here but I’ve found I can get a really nice growly, touch sensitive overdrive sound by cranking up the gain on my Quilter Tone Block 202 and then cleaning it up by turning up the limiter control. Turning down the limiter then increases the overdrive. Turn down the limiter too low and it gets fuzzy and splatty but there are a lot of very cool breakup sounds in between.

It’s a harmonically rich breakup that adds depth when stacked with pedals for higher gain.

And it reminds me of the growl I had from my old 130 watt Music Man amp when I cranked it (very painfully) into saturation.
 

11 Gauge

Doctor of Teleocity
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This may be covered here but I’ve found I can get a really nice growly, touch sensitive overdrive sound by cranking up the gain on my Quilter Tone Block 202 and then cleaning it up by turning up the limiter control. Turning down the limiter then increases the overdrive. Turn down the limiter too low and it gets fuzzy and splatty but there are a lot of very cool breakup sounds in between.

It’s a harmonically rich breakup that adds depth when stacked with pedals for higher gain.

And it reminds me of the growl I had from my old 130 watt Music Man amp when I cranked it (very painfully) into saturation.
I wish my 101 Mini had a limiter like the newer Quilters do. I think it's a necessary mechanism that aides in bridging the gap between analog SS amps and tube amps. The limiter allows for nice breakup at lower volumes, in a way that a standard master volume circuit simply doesn't allow for.

The Vox Pathfinder 15R, Lab amps, and Pearce amps (IIRC with this last one) all utilize some sort of limiter or compressor circuitry. IMO, a 'proper compressor', which can make softer parts loud, isn't really tube amp-like in its effect, so it's the actual limiter circuit that's most crucial WRT analog SS, since it provides a way to not drive the final gain stages into clipping themselves.
 

twochiptele

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Yeah, that Quilter limiter is very usable. when set right it gives me just the right amount of "splat" to play up , on or under with, all within reach of my guitar's volume pot. "Up" a good grind, "on" a nice sag ( or splat) for surf and such, and "under" a nice clean.
 

Lacking Talent

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Been more than a little discussion herein about The Hartley Peavey Papers by Hartley Peavey, esp. "Vol 3: Transtube," along with the company's all analogue SS "Transtube" amps, so I thought I'd share some clips of distorted electric guitar -- three different flavors -- comin' out of a Transformer 112 combo, as played live at bar gigs by one of the amp's actual designers...








 

tonepoet333

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I'll throw in a vote for the Peavey Bandit 112 "Red Stripe". In one, I had changed the speaker to an Eminence Wizard. The one I have now has an Eminence Texas Heat in it. As close to "tube" distortion as I have heard out of an SS amp. The Peavey Envoy 110 also.

In some recording situations, I have used both a tube amp and the Bandit to get a composite sound of both distortion sounds blended into one.
 

Blazer

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Jan Akkerman used early seventies Fender Solid State "Super showman" full stacks and got a killer overdrive tone from them.
FenderAmp69-2.jpg


THAT'S the amp he used on "Hocus Pocus"

I'm actually kinda surprised that the Doom/Stoner bands haven't snapped them up yet, given their affinity for big solid state monsters.
 




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