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Albums that you love, but do not sound good

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by 3-Chord-Genius, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've only heard one of his albums, but what you said is exactly what came to mind.
     
  2. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    For some reason, I always focus on the sound of the drums. If they sound good (in your face, not overly processed), I usually enjoy the entire mix. There's a Ted Nugent album from the 80's that it simply called "Nugent"; there were no hits or memorable songs on it, but it's been 30 years since I last heard it and the sound of that drum kit is still fresh in my mind as though I heard it this morning.
     
  3. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    I think the recording quality (or lack thereof) contributes to the whole package, sound, legend, romance, mystery...
     
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  4. Undone

    Undone TDPRI Member

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    Wow. Women and Children First. Christmas 1980..first compact stereo, first electric guitar and first Van Halen I owned personally. I remember opening the album and finding the poster of Dave chained to a fence looking all S & M'ish. My Dad saw it...freaked out and immediately introduced it to our wood stove lol! He had a similar reaction when I came home wearing an A/C D/C t-shirt and was sure I had "gone queer". Such ridiculousness. Never new the term was pre-existing and had those idiotic connotations until he "explained" it. Good grief...
     
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  5. Undone

    Undone TDPRI Member

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    Ha! I had a similar experience with Load. Put it in the car stereo and before I could get out of the record store parking it was in the trash can. I didn't want to risk giving it away and infecting someone elses audio canals.
     
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  6. Undone

    Undone TDPRI Member

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    I believe the vid is titled And Justice for Jason. And rightfully so..
     
  7. GFrank

    GFrank Tele-Meister

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    Sounds like Women and Children First didn't make much of an impression. Didn't care much for the Dave poster myself.
     
  8. ValDiaz

    ValDiaz Tele-Holic

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    Steve Earle 'Guitar Town' was the first that came to mind for me. Great songs, horrible 80s production.

    Big fan of Bernard Butler era Suede but the drums in particular sound appalling. Apparently Butler laid down a "him or me" ultimatum. Amazingly they chose the producer & Butler quit....
     
  9. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Doctor of Teleocity

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    Live albums come to mind immediately, but then that was probably the technology of the day, so it's kinda understandable.
    Of course Aerosmith's Live Bootleg was such a bad mix that even they called it a bootleg.
    Lots of the 80s albums were so over processed and over produced that they sound very dated now. But again, that was probably just the sound of that era.
     
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  10. Ron R

    Ron R Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Peter Gabriel's 'US'. Lot of brilliant tunes, muddy as hell overall sound. Production fail, IMO.
     
  11. Ron R

    Ron R Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    In fairness, I think it may be that Revolver is just a better album with better songs. Or maybe that's just my opinion, man.
     
  12. RB522

    RB522 Tele-Meister

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    New York Dolls. Love the album, but the production sounds like a school project. Not a very good one at that.
     
  13. GCBguitars

    GCBguitars TDPRI Member

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    Everything recorded by The Sisters of Mercy before Floodland.

    I would say ...and Justice for All, but... the guitars on that album occasionally sound fantastic, rather than bad, or even merely good. The last two minutes of the title track, the Blackened intro, the cover of Diamond Head's "The Prince" that is on my Japanese import... so it's a mixed bag.

    Exile on Main Street sounds terrible... on some tracks. "Let it Loose" is one of the best pieces of production and recording ever managed, anywhere... so the Bad Stones record is almost certainly "Steel Wheels".

    Devin Townsend, much as I love him, sometimes buries the lede, especially on Transcendence...

    Everything by the Replacements.

    Everything by Flogging Molly except "Wax Ecstatic"
     
  14. tbb007

    tbb007 Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    I always found the production on The River to feel too dry and airless. Then a couple of years ago, I ran across a remix that was described as “official.” It’s clearly not, but whoever did it is a genius: the presence and immediacy are amazing.
     
  15. jdgladw

    jdgladw Tele-Meister

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    I haven't heard of this album. When I looked it up all that came back was an album by Sponge with that title. Were you thinking maybe of the Albini produced album Drunken Lullabies as the exception?
     
  16. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    This has probably been mentioned, but Dylan's "Street Legal" (1978). One of my favorites, but what a holy mess.

    A few of the tracks--"We Better Talk This Over"--are well done, but the rest....even the re-mastering of some 10 or 12 years ago couldn't improve it. Muddy, thin, garbled. Sounds like a rehearsal tape off a couple of cassettes that had "Elvis in Hawaii" on them first, and were dropped in vinegar, and played at the bottom of garbage can, by a drunk possum. With so many instruments to manage, this kind of venture took a really skilled hand, or dozen of 'em.

    Quite the shame given that many of the songs are goose-bump good, and manage to work well despite dragging that possum around. Dylan was much faulted for going with the big band approach for this album and on its subsequent tour, but as many of the live bootlegs of the '78 world tour show, he could orchestrate really well. "Senor (Tales of Yankee Power)" is perfectly constructed, and "Where Are You Tonight (Journey Through Dark Heat)" is truly toe-tappingly anthemic yet so painfully private (Bobby's divorce was bringing him to that existential ledge, indeed: "I bit into the root/ Of the forbidden fruit/ With the juice runnin' down my leg/ And I fought with your boss/ Who'd never known about loss/ And who was always too proud to beg"). On that track on the album, and, live, after the pale-white-bread "Budokan" mess, the band could really cook it, giving a "Blonde on Blonde"+some-angry-Motown-oomph show.

    (In terms of orchestrating, I do wish that the album proper had more of David Mansfield's mandolin and Alan Pasqua's piano on it, but oh well.)

    But the major problem was, surpise!, Sir Bobby's voice. And I say this as someone who sees him as one of the greatest singers ever. But he blew his pipes into his nose on the last leg of the Rolling Thunder Revue tours. (Maybe all that circus-sands 'caine was caustic...?) You can hear it shred as the tour goes on. On "Street Legal," his voice's agonies well fit the songs' anguish. But, man...what this album could've sounded like with more rehearsal, better production, and Bob's voice of, say, '74-'76.

    Great cover photo, though. A quickie shot at the base of the cheap recording studio he set up in Santa Monica (which he fittingly called Rundown Studio). Very much the man awaiting his savior, or maybe a washed-out star awaiting his dealer for a moment's escape from memory, as his just-after-this conversion albums would voice.

    (Sorry for the rambling post. LONG day grading exams. Almost all of them extremely good, though, so it's nice to meander over wishes rather than herald humanity's end, as I usually do after grading America's Future, Like, Leaders, and Whatever. The kids really learned some chops this week, when many were reading Faulkner for the first time, too.)



    There's a long-distance train
    Rollin' through the rain
    Tears on the letter I write
    There's a woman I long to touch
    And I'm missin' her so much
    But she's driftin' like a satellite....
    But without you, it doesn't seem right
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2018
  17. GCBguitars

    GCBguitars TDPRI Member

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    You're right.

    I meant Sponge.
     
  18. Itchyfeet1000

    Itchyfeet1000 Tele-Meister

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    I remember this album being criticised in the press for it's poor production values. Not sure I agree entirely but it's worth posting here purely for being consistently in amy all time top 10 favourite albums since its release in 1990.

     
  19. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Afflicted

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    "Got Live If You Want It" is an old live album of the Rolling Stones. It was recorded in 1966 using then state of the art crappy equipment. The tone is raw.

    When I was in college, I had a girlfriend who played this album for me because she knew I was big Stones fan. She introduced me to it. The production is awful, but I love it.
     
  20. Teleposer

    Teleposer Tele-Holic

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    There are many albums that don't have very good sonic quality if you listen even with my half dead ears and on half decent equipment. Some of them the biggest sellers ever.

    Then there are some that many have never heard of that knock it out of the park mix wise. Thinking 3AM Eternal by the KLF - anything mixed by Mark 'Spike' Stent.



    So many very poorly recorded albums. It doesn't matter. It's the music that counts.

    But yes, there are some real dogs out there that sold millions. No one noticed.

    Except a few of us. My hearing is on the decline now, high frequency wise, and that also includes low-frequency wise. But I know a good mix, a great mix, a muddy mix.

    Humans process sound within a quite narrow frequency band. Cutting off the lows and highs doesn't make you unable to hear a great mix when you hear one.

    There is great music. There are great mixes. Sometimes there are both.

    Music is the best.
     
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