Aging Tweed

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by Swampash&Tweed, Feb 21, 2021.

  1. Swampash&Tweed

    Swampash&Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    I recently got a new Head from a highly respected builder. I had him custom make me a tweed head cab because I wanted to match it with my favorite 2x12 Kendrick cab.(Hence my name......I love me some tweed!)

    The cab is about 20 yrs old and looked aged even back then. Extremely well made .

    I love the pair. KILLER. But I was thinking of aging the head cab in the near future to better match. Ive read alot about shlack. Was just wondering if anyone else developed a better or different approach?
     

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  2. Jay Jernigan

    Jay Jernigan Tele-Afflicted

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    Shellac perhaps, or lacquer, I don't know for sure. Complicated processes, if I understand correctly. Can't really tell, for sure, but it mostly just looks too clean.
     
  3. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    That's going to take a really dark shellac, probably garnet. Even then, you may need to add some brown dye to get closer to the speaker color. I'm wondering if the tweed on the speaker cab was darker to begin with.
     
  4. jrblue

    jrblue Friend of Leo's

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    Though I wouldn't bother personally, I am pretty surer I could match colors with a little care and effort, but doing so is totally dependent on your eye and ability to color-match. I like shellac and it does adhere well to most finishes so might be a good choice. (I don't know what your head has for a finish over the tweed.) It would take some doing to find a shellac that gives you a good color match. I buy flakes and mix my own, and that would be a good way to go, but it's not cheap. Finally: if you have different finishing materials on the head and speaker cab, they might get matched today but could lose that match over time if they use different finishes and therefore respond to sunliught differently over the years. 5 years later, they could be unmatched again.
     
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  5. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    I had a similar situation, not with tweed, but a head/speaker cab that didn't match. I decided to go medieval and just recover both.
     
  6. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Shellac. The Kendrick is a bit brown, Amber Shellac will be a bit more gold. May be tough to match. I wonder if trying some spray paint thin dusting coat could make it match more brown? Got a close up of the Kendrick cab?
    You could ask Gerald what he used on that cab, tell him you are trying to match a head to it.

    This is 50/50 amber and clear shellac probably two coats. Came out a bit blotchy.
    The more coats you put on the darker it gets but not such a soft brown as the kendrick, more bronze or...?
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Swampash&Tweed

    Swampash&Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    Thats what I was hoping for. A spray rattle can option as opposed to brushing on shlack flakes.......maybe some amber Nitro?
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2021
  8. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Use clear shellac first, you can buy the stuff in a the spray can. This seals the seams and helps even out the darkening. I'd spray two or three light coats. The goal really is to just seal it.

    If it needs it, give it a light sanding to take off any fuzzy or sharp dust spots. Don't have to go crazy, just take down any high bumps.

    Then, use Zinser amber shellac. Buy the stuff in a can, it works fine. The secret, however is to thin it down with denatured alcohol. I'd mix it about 1:1 alcohol and shellac.

    You can spread it with a cloth, just rub it on gently and let it cure. You can use a brush, but it's hard to control how much shellac you're putting on it and it'll run... Trust me, it'll run. Just grab an old t-shirt or rag that won't shed lint. Painter's rags form the big box stores work fine for this. Spreading with a rag goes quickly, so really it's easy. If you are getting streaky results, you can thin it down more. You can soften earlier coats with alcohol, or a thinned out shellac/alcohol mix, as well.

    Let the first couple of coats dry/cure at least 30 minutes between coats. I stick to the 4 or 5 coats a day... Spreading out the later coats. It may not need 4 or 5 coats, in fact it may only take two or three.

    I've found that Zinser's amber shellac matches aged lacquer quite well. But it won't get any darker, it is what it is. So, if you want ti to age like lacquer, gotta use lacquer. You can spray lacquer right on top of shellac, too.
     
  9. netgear69

    netgear69 Tele-Afflicted

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    Stewmac vintage amber & medium brown color tone test until you match what you need then seal it with either few coats of clear nitro or clear fast dry satin varnish
    if it is that newer vinyl faux tweed i would be very careful about putting anything on it
     
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  10. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    ^^^^This is good advice to seal it first before using anything with much color. It's more forgiving that way/
     
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  11. The Ballzz

    The Ballzz Tele-Afflicted

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    When thinned, the Zinsser sprays quite well, with a real spray rig or even through a Preval sprayer. As mentioned by @Axis29 , it will run if applied to heavily! And yeah, top coating with lacquer may be a good thing, but on the couple I've done and lived with, it hasn't seemed necessary!
    The Need For Tweed, Indeed!
    Gene
     
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  12. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    I can't tell by the picture, but you should determine what "tweed" you have. There is a fabric (which is rough texturee) and then there is tolex tweed (which feels like vinyl, cause that's what it is). The fabric can be tinted very easily, the vinyl cannot.
     
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  13. Martian

    Martian Tele-Meister Gold Supporter

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    If it were me I’d take a pair of brown shoes. I’d polish the shoes. Then I’d use the polishing rag to wipe over the tweed. I’d have a clean cloth ready to wipe off if necessary. (Test it on the bottom first if nervous.) Then the amber Zinserr shellac is good. And if there’s already some type of sealer on the cabinet just use a Scotchbrite pad to open up the surface a bit before the polish and shellac.
     
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  14. Antoon

    Antoon Tele-Afflicted

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    I just used a bit of shoe polish and a brush. Some dark grey/brown color. Worked great but I was not trying to match the color to another cabinet.
     
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