Afterwork Special

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by BC-Rush, Nov 7, 2019 at 2:39 PM.

  1. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    So there are a few things that are true in my life. One thing is that I work a lot of overtime, the other is that I like making guitars. One other thing, is that I like to save a few dollars here and there.

    What I'm posting is an example of a pretty nice guitar that I made for not a lot of $, and did the whole thing in under a week... Aka a week where I'm not working out of town!

    Materials used:

    Two pine boards (3/4", premium grade. I think I spent about $20 for them)

    Wood glue

    El-cheapo guitar neck purchased online

    Similarly priced electronics, pickguard, tuners, input jack, screws, and Wilkinson bridge

    Spray on polyurethane

    Tools:

    Many clamps (c-clamps, bar clamps, spring clamps)

    Bandsaw (jigsaw would work just fine, the first several guitar bodies I made o only had a jigsaw)

    Router with top bearing and bottom bearing flush trim bits

    Electric sander with 120 and 220 grit paper

    Drill with various bits


    Other daggone notes:

    Originally I did this to show to one of my coworkers who is interested in getting started on making guitar stuff for not a lot of doll hairs, and I'd like to share this build here.



    So let's kick it off. First thing is get a couple of nice straight boards from the store, cut them to about 20" or so.
    IMG_20191107_105529736.jpg


    After you do that, you're gonna want to glue two pieces together side to side, whichever you want the top and bottom to be. I used pieces of wood wrapped in shrink wrap to keep everything straight

    IMG_20191107_111107073.jpg

    Do that with the top and bottom pieces, once the glue has dried remove the clamps, then sandwich the top and bottom together, and clamp once more. Tip: use caul pieces with clamps to avoid marring the wood.

    IMG_20191107_140448690.jpg

    After that is cured, you will have a pretty decent body blank which will look something like this: IMG_20190728_083247550.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019 at 3:19 PM
  2. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    After you have your inexpensive body blank, go ahead and make a guitar out of it!

    What I did was rout out the guts and trace the outline. I like routing first as it keeps everything straight on the center line:
    IMG_20190728_110502287.jpg

    After that the obvious next step is to cut out the body on a bandsaw and rout the edges flush, which is a pretty quick step.
    IMG_20190728_115550079.jpg
     
  3. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Cool, so now we have a guitar body for under $30. What now?
    Next you're going to want to either use a roundover bit or a palm sander to get the edges to a nice smoothed over feel. I used a sander this time, however I do have a router but for that. You could either rout then sand, or just sand. Not a big deal, either method is pretty quick.
    ...either that or just leave it squared off, I doubt too many people would care. Heck, you could even inlet the edges slightly and install some plastic binding. I didn't on this particular guitar, but those are some obvious choices to be made.

    After you get it all sanded down and looking pretty good, apply the finish! It's easy with spray cans of poly. I like polyurethane on wood finishes because it dries pretty fast, doesn't stink like lacquer, and provides a harder finish. It does have a slight yellow tint to it, but hey, it's on wood so who cares?! Looks pretty good I think:

    IMG_20190802_180505721.jpg

    Not pictured: drilling holes for the strings. Pretty straight forward though, just drill them out perpendicular to the body. But you already knew that.
     
  4. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Cool, now it's about ready to assemble. Just gotta drill a few more holes for the wires and then screw it all together. No biggie, just gotta keep an eye on things and make sure they line up right.

    IMG_20190802_180529559.jpg

    IMG_20190802_180923684.jpg
     
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  5. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Nifty! Moving right along. Now all you have to do is put it all together and you will have a really pretty pinecaster like this one:

    IMG_20190802_181950181.jpg

    Pretty cool, this is by far the quickest I've ever made a guitar, and now my coworker is interested in making his own!


    Notes: I left out some measurements like neck pocket depth, but I always rout to 5/8". As far as pickup and control plate depths, I just keep going until everything fits. Not sure what the standard depths are, but my way works just fine.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2019 at 4:18 PM
  6. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    What was your total price in the end?
     
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  7. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    Show off!!!! You remind me of an old Monty Python sketch on how to achieve world piece.....easy as pie!
    Nice guitar BTW.
     
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  8. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Glad you asked! It was well under $200, off the top of my head I paid roughly $25 for the wood, and about $120 for the parts and neck. I did go with a slightly better bridge, I've had good luck with Wilkinson in the past, and I prefer it over the super cheap $10 bridges on Amazon.
     
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  9. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Thank you so much! I really appreciate it!
     
  10. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sweet, nice job.
     
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  11. Jmwright777

    Jmwright777 TDPRI Member

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    Do you think you would have busted 200 if you built the neck as well?
     
  12. Lashdog

    Lashdog TDPRI Member

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    I really like the color and have a GFS tele body I'd like to finish like yours. Can you tell me what exactly you used to achieve this color. I would greatly appreciate you. Thanks
     
  13. BC-Rush

    BC-Rush Tele-Meister

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    Probably would have been cutting it close, but I think fit the cost of maple, trussrod, fretwire, markers, etc would still be under $200.


    I ended up using a very light light coat of minwax golden pecan stain rubbed in with an old sock. After that dried, I used a utility knife blade as a card scraper and smoothed the entire body. Once that was done, I applied gloss polyurethane spray for three coats. I didn't buff or anything, but you could buff if you wanted to!
     
  14. Macrogats

    Macrogats Friend of Leo's

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    Good choice. I’m a fan of those Wilkinson bridges.

    Nice guitar btw. :)
     
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