Affinity telecaster grain question

Butmin7

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Hello everyone,

Just bought a 2019 Squier Affinity telecaster at Guitar Center for 80$ and was really drawn to this neck.

It’s got this kind of dark pattern throughout and I wanted to know if anyone could tell me more about this property of maple fretboards. Was it painted or stained after to look this way?

Predominantly a classical guitar player so this is only my second electric guitar ever.

Thanks!
 

Toadtele

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It wasn’t stained or painted. I’m sure some people would pass on it. I think it’s cool!
And 80$ for an affinity is a score. Congratulations.
 

Nogoodnamesleft

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That’s beautiful! I once had a house with maple floors and the boards had natural variations like that.
 

schmee

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Hello everyone,

Just bought a 2019 Squier Affinity telecaster at Guitar Center for 80$ and was really drawn to this neck.

It’s got this kind of dark pattern throughout and I wanted to know if anyone could tell me more about this property of maple fretboards. Was it painted or stained after to look this way?

Predominantly a classical guitar player so this is only my second electric guitar ever.

Thanks!
A lot of maple has dark patches in it. It's just budget wood. A lot of maple also has birdseye and flame in it. SOme in every tree pretty much. Not sure how they justify the "upgrade" for it.
 

Butmin7

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Thank you for your responses—appreciate the kind words for the guitar! Here are some more photos, including a really interesting (weird?) grain on the side of the neck.

The pockmark things on the headstock are not indented/recessed at all, so it also appears like it is part of the grain. It is a made in Indonesia model and top loader, if anyone was curious.
 

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FSRCustomTeleHHGT

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A lot of maple has dark patches in it. It's just budget wood. A lot of maple also has birdseye and flame in it. SOme in every tree pretty much. Not sure how they justify the "upgrade" for it.
There's no such thing as budge maple. It's maple. The same kind used in high-end guitars.

I am guessing that someone rubbed Tru-Oil on it and it darkened the grain somewhat. But it is an unusual piece of maple nonetheless.
 

schmee

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There's no such thing as budge maple. It's maple. The same kind used in high-end guitars.

I am guessing that someone rubbed Tru-Oil on it and it darkened the grain somewhat. But it is an unusual piece of maple nonetheless.
All wood is graded. Defect free wood is more expensive than wood with defects. Of course some of us like the look of defects for their uniqueness. But not everyone wants a Tele with knots in the wood like a Pinecaster! There are many requirements and even college classes on grading wood. Wood grades are even specified on pieces purchased for guitars at Stew Mac etc. Musical instrument wood grading is even different than normal hardwood grading and classifies wood up to an AAAA classification, which may have a lot of quilting, birdseye, flame or other unique asthetics.

About Hardwood Lumber Grading

The National Hardwood Lumber Association rules were designed to provide the furniture industry a mathematically measurable method to grade lumber for its amount of clear, defect free wood. They’ve been be adopted across the hardwood industry as a way to consistently provide a similar product to customers time and time again.

Hardwood grades are based on the size and number of clear pieces that can be obtained from a board when it is cut up to be used to make a product. Grades are not determined by gut reactions to what a person thinks the grade should be, but actual measurements of clear sections and definitions for defects.
 
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Nogoodnamesleft

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There's no such thing as budge maple. It's maple. The same kind used in high-end guitars.

I am guessing that someone rubbed Tru-Oil on it and it darkened the grain somewhat. But it is an unusual piece of maple nonetheless.
Maple can vary quite a bit. Yes it’s all maple, but there’s often a premium for figuring, or the lack thereof. Birds eye, flame, spalted typically fetch a higher price. Clear, knot free, with little colour variation, has been selected out of a mixed pile. Grain like the fretboard on the OP’s guitar is usually considered the “budget” stuff - not because there is anything inferior at all, as you say it’s still maple, but because of grading based on appearance. There was a reason we had chosen the lower priced maple flooring in that house - I love the variation in grain.
 

Wildeman

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Great deal, I dig the neck. I play two Affinity's, they're modded up but were already good to begin with, one is now a Esquire and one has a Duncan Lil 59/ Classic Stack pickup combo with a Hipshot bridge and steel saddles. They're my only Telly's right now and I'm quite happy.
 




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