For Sale advice on selling my Marshall jmp-1

turfdoc

Tele-Meister
Joined
Mar 14, 2009
Posts
216
Location
Texas
I have never sold any of my gear before and am starting out with my jmp-1 because it's the easiest to manage due to size and weight. Also because it is mint. I have only used it in the studio for recording and sound processing. So any advice would be helpful, whether about ebay, reverb, etc, or on here. Thanks all.
 

Deafen

Tele-Meister
Joined
Mar 28, 2003
Posts
240
Location
North Carolina
Lots of high-res pictures are key to getting the most you can from it, especially if it's as mint as you say. Anything that can prove the manufacture date - serial number, date code, etc. - should be included. (Some people don't like sharing serial numbers, but on an amp there's no reason not to.)

Be wary of pricing it based on listings that you see - remember, those are ones that haven't sold, and are often wildly inflated. Look at the Reverb info page for the JMP-1 (https://reverb.com/p/marshall-jmp-1-preamp) to get a feel for what they're actually selling for. It has both monthly averages and a list of completed sales *with the condition*.

Obvious, but should be stated: If you need the money and are trying to sell in a hurry, price it near the lower end; if you're patient, price it near the higher end and be prepared to wait a while for the right buyer. In my experience, sales on Reverb usually happen within the first 48 hours or take months. If you're holding out for more money, don't drop the price too soon.

My personal strategy is to have two numbers: The target that I'd really like to get and the absolute minimum that I will accept. I then list it for 10-15% more than the target, and say that I'm accepting offers. Sure, you get a lot of lowballers, but you can just ignore them. If an offer comes in at, say, 25% below asking, you can counteroffer at your real target and usually make the sale. There's some psychology at play here; once a buyer has made an offer, some part of their brain starts feeling like they have a stake in making sure that they get it.

Hypothetical example - let's say I'm selling a guitar that I'd like to get $1000 for, and I'll take $900 as a bare minimum. I'll list it for $1149. If someone offers me $850, I'll counter at $1000, and likely either make the sale, or at least prompt another counter above my floor. If someone offers $950, I'll probably just take it. Under no circumstances do I accept an offer below my minimum - that's why it's a minimum!

Of course some joker is always going to offer $500, because they think you're desperate or dumb. Sometimes I'll counter those with my original asking price just for fun, but usually I just ignore them.
 




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