Advice on Removing Existing Strings and Re-Stringing

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Digiplay, Feb 8, 2020.

What is your preferred method for re-stringing?

  1. 1) Remove and replace one string at a time.

    55 vote(s)
    35.9%
  2. 2) Loosen and cut all strings.

    98 vote(s)
    64.1%
  1. Squawker

    Squawker Tele-Meister

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    On a Bigsby equipped guitar I'll likely go one at a time... otherwise slacken and snip-snip-snip.
     
    RichCuellarPDX likes this.
  2. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    Both work just fine.

    Unless I’m doing something else (like removing the pickguard) I usually do one string at a time on my Strat to help shorten the time getting the tremolo settled in though...


     
  3. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Afflicted

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    I used to fuss with string removal and carefully unwind them one at a time... USED TO.

    Now on my Tele's and any other solid body, I just cut 'em off at full tension.
    Never seen a difference in the neck or other ill effects.

    I cut above the nut and hold my hand over the short end so it doesn't fly away.
    Guitar on it's back, body away from me, standing near the head stock.
    The long cut end fly's away from me toward the bridge. Not put an eye out yet.... :twisted:

    I re-string, starting with the low E and work up from there.

    I like saf-t-post tuners.... :) :cool:
     
  4. SpringTank

    SpringTank TDPRI Member

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    This should be printed on the back of every single pack of strings.
     
    gimmeatele likes this.
  5. FenderGuy53

    FenderGuy53 Poster Extraordinaire

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    ^^^ THIS ^^^

    Removing all the strings when restringing allows you to clean and polish the fretboard and frets.
     
    teleplayr likes this.
  6. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

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    I do it both ways about 50/50. I'll do one string at a time if I don't have a tuner handy and I'm doing my tuning by ear.
     
  7. esseff

    esseff Tele-Holic

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    The only time you'll have problems by not changing strings one at a time is if you've got a floating tremolo. The last time I did that it took all afternoon to set my Floyd Rose up again. :oops:
     
    Doorlord likes this.
  8. Gardo

    Gardo Tele-Meister

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    Sometimes my wife wants to “help me” with a home project so she goes to google and looks for the most OCD video she can find claiming that this person really knows
    Sometimes it just ain’t that complicated
    Removing all the strings gives me a good chance to clean everything
    The only way I’ve ever done it
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2020
  9. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    I couldn’t vote for both. My CS Strat has its truss rod adjustment at the heel of the neck. Removing all strings at once makes it easier to make the adjustment. My Gretsch has a floating bridge. It’s a lot more stable if I change one string at a time. I usually change my other guitars one string at a time unless I need to get to something under the pick guard. All strings come off if frets need attention. I never really thought about this before because it’s so obvious what to do.
     
    Greggorios likes this.
  10. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    How do those who voted for “one by one” think things like refrets or fretwork happen?
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2020
  11. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Tele-Holic

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    Same here. Other than those times when a fingerboard might need some steel wood attention, or a pickguard/pickup change, I always change one string at a time, starting with the low E string.
     
    AxemanVR likes this.
  12. John C

    John C Friend of Leo's

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    Put me in the "it depends" category - depending on the bridge. A hard tail I might take all the strings off or I might say do all the wound strings then all the plain strings. If it's a floating tremolo then I'll do them one at a time; the exception being when I've owned Strats where I've decked the trem, then I'll treat it like a hard tail and either take them all off at once or do them 3 at a time.
     
  13. memorex

    memorex Friend of Leo's

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    Since I like to clean and polish the fingerboard and frets, and well as vacuum the dust out of the bridge and pickups, I remove the old strings first.
     
    kbold likes this.
  14. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    I know I change strings more often than I need to on either electrics or acoustics ( about every 3 gigs or 3 weeks of steady home play), but I like strings that hit that balance of broken-in, but still maintain brightnes. so I just go with my routine.

    ( my fingertips don't like coated strings, so I'm fine with frequent changes)

    I change one string at a time on any guitar, except when I need to change 9V battery inside the soundhole of my Martin ( few times a year)
     
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  15. Gardo

    Gardo Tele-Meister

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    I have an Ibanez Artcore with a floating bridge. To simplify things I put a little piece of masking tape at each side of the bridge to mark the location ,then remove all the strings.
     
  16. hollowman

    hollowman Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    on my acoustics one at a time usually. except for the annual deep clean. on electrics, usually all off at once so i can wipe all the dried sweat and beer out of the bridge
     
  17. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    Loosen all the strings. Take them off the guitar. Acoustic or electric, either one, replace them all at once.
     
  18. Torz Johnson

    Torz Johnson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I cut 'em all off. the only guitar where I do them one at a time is my Rickenbacker; anybody who's tried to re-string one of those ""R" tailpieces will understand.
     
  19. Digiplay

    Digiplay Tele-Holic

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    .



    When wrapping a string, I take it that you want each successive wrap below the previous wrap?
     
  20. esseff

    esseff Tele-Holic

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    I re-string mine one wrap over the protruding end and the rest under. Never had any tuning problems because of slippage.

    [​IMG]
     
    Greggorios likes this.
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