Advice from teachers

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by rxtech, Aug 3, 2021.

  1. rxtech

    rxtech Tele-Holic

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    At this point in my playing career, I would like to learn more, but I would like to get a little bit of direction from any of you teachers. I know how to play the cowboy chords, some bar chords, the first pentatonic position that we all know, the major scale, and I have been working on a little bit of a caged chords. In a step by step fashion, what would you all advise a relatively beginner guitar student like myself to focus on? I don’t have a guitar teacher (and that would definitely be more optimal), but, as I said, what would be a good step by step guide?
     
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  2. Stanford Guitar

    Stanford Guitar Friend of Leo's

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    I'm not a teacher but I competed/performed classical guitar for a very long time, and studied with some well known people. I'd recommend getting a cheap classical guitar, learning to read music (if you can't), and work on some basic stuff like Carcassi, Sor, Giuliani etc. It is very rewarding, and it will make pretty much anything else you play seem very easy.

    Check out 120 Studies for the Right Hand by Giuliani.

    This is a pretty good channel for classical stuff.

    https://www.youtube.com/c/Thisisclassicalguitar/videos
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
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  3. rxtech

    rxtech Tele-Holic

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    While I would love to learn to play classical and I think reading is a valuable skill, I’m looking for a step by step (ie, work on this, now work on this, now work on this) approach that doesn’t necessarily require reading. But, thanks for the great advice! By the way, I checked out one of his videos, and I like the fact that he has a free downloadable PDF for his book one!
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
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  4. Killing Floor

    Killing Floor Friend of Leo's

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    My 5th grade teacher told me “everyone likes a good one but no one likes a smart one”.

    Oh, guitar teacher, don’t look at my hands or she’ll hit me with a ruler.
     
  5. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Doctor of Teleocity

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    The relationship between chords and scales and modes. If you can play the major scale pattern in different places you are well on the the way.

    after that, playing in a band and keeping in time and in tune and feeling the dynamics is the best teacher of all.
     
  6. miguelalmeida

    miguelalmeida Tele-Meister

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    We’re all absolute beginners like Bowie sang. Of course he wasn’t when he wrote it, but he had to start somewhere.
    I feel so clever now.

    My advice would be to get a looper and play over your own chord progressions what you are learning (scales, riffs, etc...)
    A metronome or a drum pedal greatly improves your timing if you use one as well.
    Then there is Tdpri challenges where you’ll find how little you know and how much you have to improve.
     
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  7. jaytee32

    jaytee32 Tele-Meister

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    If you are learning predominantly acoustic guitar, I can highly recommend Paul Davids' new course "Acoustic Adventure".

     
  8. thankyouguitar

    thankyouguitar Tele-Meister

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    Compose a short single-note melodic fragment of maybe 8 notes max. Then for each note in that melody, pick another note under the hand that you think goes best with it-- it can be above or below the melody note. Do this for each note in the melody so that you are now playing two note chords. Repeat and add a third note. Repeat again and add a 4th note.

    Next steps can be arpeggiating the chords, changing the duration of each melody note so they're not all the same length, and on and on....
     
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  9. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    Well if you are playing Cowboy chords, thats a good start. But do you understand the root of each of those Cowboy Chords ? If you can play "C" , "D" , "G" , "E" and "A" in simple forms under the 5th fret you are actually playing out of 3 different root modes and forms. Study each of those forms that you already know by moving them UP the fret board and learn the root positions. All most Major and Minor BARR chords are, are various positions of Cowboy Chords ! Once you begin to get acclimated to the different root positions and forms, when you look at the fret board , you will see them clear as day.

    I play Cowboy Chords all the time, perhaps every song, but I play them all the way up and down the fret board in different forms !

    Have fun, get to work ! :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2021
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  10. OmegaWoods

    OmegaWoods Tele-Holic

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    Step one: Google Justin Guitar
    Step two: Work through his lessons That'll keep you busy for a year or so...

    In your spare time, watch Stich method and Chris Sherland on YouTube. Also, Marty Music to learn some fun songs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2021
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  11. teletail

    teletail Friend of Leo's

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    There is no substitute for one on one lessons with a good teacher. Videos and books are a good supplement but they don't provide feedback. If you're serious, you'll find the time and money for lessons. Many teachers offer lessons via Skype now, so you basically have every teacher in the world available to you. You don't have to take weekly lessons, but I wouldn't take less than every two weeks.

    We find a way to do the things we want; I've seen it over and over for more than 60 years.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2021
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