Advice for the budding pro guitarist. (a bit lengthy)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by RevMike, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. guitarbiker

    guitarbiker Tele-Holic

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    Good suggestions all, but the OP didn't say what he went to college for. I'm hoping it is for something other than music. Business course, electronics, plumbing something else. I didn't do that just got better and better at guitar playing studying music in College, University, master classes, etc. I
    t's a hard road and I'm thinking it's even harder out there now. Best to be a serious musician hobbiest. It's hard to tell young people that because they love music so much but after your 10,000th gig playing music you really don't like just to make a living the love of music fades.
     
  2. Lerb21

    Lerb21 Friend of Leo's

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    If I may add one...

    Learn about live sound set up...

    Different kinds of microphones, PA heads and boards, Unpowered vs. Powered Speakers, what high high-mid, low-mind, and low do as well as other EQ ideas.

    I'm the only one who knows how to run sound for our band and that combined with knowing every part of every song we do on all the instruments gives them all the more reason to keep me around.
     
  3. jimbach

    jimbach Tele-Holic

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    Speaking of electronics, allow me to add:
    • Learn how to do minor repairs of your gear, and carry the tools necessary to do so - soldering pencil & solder, screwdrivers, some wrenches, wire snips, etc. Nothing worse than getting to a gig and finding that a connection has gone faulty.
     
  4. RevMike

    RevMike Poster Extraordinaire

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    Now...If I'd had all this great advice when I was 22. I prob'ly would not have gone into banking. I'd have probably tried to make a go if it as a guitarist. Then at about 35, gone into production...or something. I know a few guys that have done that and gone on to be successful in the music biz doing something other than playing...although most still try to keep their chops up...and do a little slinging here and there. Just like being a coach in sports....it helps to have been "in the bigs" for a while.
     
  5. tiktok

    tiktok Poster Extraordinaire

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    11. Marry a tolerant woman who makes good money.
     
  6. Jester01

    Jester01 Tele-Meister

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    ROFL thats good advice for any man I think...

    Not a pro myself, But looking good onstage I think comes down to sometimes less is more....

    As mentioned... Black jeans, Black shirt, a comfortable pair of Black boots... and a belt... run a comb thru yer mop.... be shaved.... teeth clean.... make sure your clothes are freshly laundered..... sometimes that stuff really shows up under lights.... I know this from bartending and working clubs hehe... seen alot....

    On stage people see alot of you.... so a belt with a plain silver buckle... is gonna shine an awful lot on stage.... and besides... too big of a buckle and youll scratch up your lovely...
     
  7. JCSouthpawtele

    JCSouthpawtele Friend of Leo's

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    Yes. Thats one of the reasons I got into amp repair. I've had players amps go down at a show. As a sound engineer it helps to have skill related to other parts of the production of a show. Simple tools to carry in your guitar briefcase would be a chord chart book or the app for I-phone,a multimeter,and an outlet checker. So goes it for a sideman guitarist. As a hired gun/sideman, the budget for a extra road crew (guitar techs/monitor engineers) are slim.
    Knowledge of the keys and bass would help. I've seen some players that were there on the backline area that played guitar as well as keys,Eric Caudiex of Joe Satriani's band come to mind as well as the guy playing on the road with The Goo Goo Dolls.
    As a guitarist it would help to know a bit of slide both on Dobro and/or Lap steel. Being able to do more than just burn up the neck as a lead player goes a longer way down the road.
     
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