About to start a BSB build. Any advice?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by lineboat, Oct 16, 2019.

  1. lineboat

    lineboat Friend of Leo's

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    I plan on starting my first “Blackguard” build in a few days. I have a nice one piece swamp ash body almost ready to spray.
    Probably sanding sealer only, no grain filler.
    I’ve never sprayed the butterscotch color before. Any tips or things to watch for?
     
  2. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    I’d start with a cheap margarinescotch first so as not to waste money if it goes wrong. Sorry..................I’ll go away now.
     
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  3. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Splurge on the Ican'tbelieveit'snotbutterscotch, man!

    Also going away now. :oops:
     
  4. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Can’t stand that stuff, we refer to it as It can’t believe it’s not dog s**t!
     
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  5. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I’m with you, man. To me it’s definitely worse than plain ol margarine.

    sorry off-topic!
     
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  6. lineboat

    lineboat Friend of Leo's

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    We need a laugh button!
     
  7. Wrighty

    Wrighty Tele-Afflicted

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    Just my daft sense of humour! Great to see others as daft!
     
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  8. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Opaque (RI Versions) BSB?
    Or the Boss (Springsteen) style BSB?

    The Springsteen BSB is just Amber tint in clear finish which was nitro back then. The more modern version is the RI which is an Opaque or Semi Opaque finish that uses an Amber pigment.
    I can get the Springsteen BSB look with Amber shellac, clear shellac and a few drops of brown tint, which after I have the hue I want I then coat in clear lacquer. Back in the day they put the tint in the lacquer. Transtint is great for this, as is color tone (same thing actually)
    The RI version can be made up several ways from adding tints to white mixol pigmented lacquer to using the amber tinted mixol is clear lacquer. Mixol, transtint and the Colortone products can all help get this finish.

    I hope this helps.

    Also am I understanding that you are o.k with a sunken finish?... meaning the finish flows into the grain and pores w/out filler and is a visible as part of the finish?
     
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  9. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    You have two challenges which should be something to enjoy.

    1. Decide what BSB means to you - there are many variations in how vintage finishes have aged so there's no wrong answer. You might actually decide on what became popular in the 70's as a "natural" finish (i.e. clear with a secret amount of amber dye but admit to anyone that it was "stained").

    2. Figure out a way to get reliable test panels - which can be difficult if you don't have any of the same wood to work with. If you didn't make the body (or there aren't enough off-cuts left over), then I'd use basic maple or birch veneer plywood which should be white enough not to throw off the color, but still has some grain pattern so you know if you can see through the finish or not.

    I mixed pigment (Mixol) and dye (transtint) into a white pigmented base until I got the butterscotch color I was looking for, but it was at that point an opaque paint. Then mix with clear until it starts to get translucent enough for the wood to show through per your taste. Finally you topcoat with clear which you might or might not want to modify with a little amber dye as a final flavor enhancer.

    And just for the record I am not old enough to remember when margarine came white in the package and you mixed in a little pill of butter-colored dye before using it.
     
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  10. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Sorry i should've actually read your question. I would suggest sneaking up on the color with thin coats just until you see it start to have some opacity. This makes it easier to avoid stripes or uneven coverage.

    Also i would make sure that you get a good seal of sanding sealer (or at least clear) before you shoot any color. This is because I find that the first coat or two will soak in unevenly, and that could complicate things if that first coat had color in it. Then you sand back any raised grain and you have a perfectly level, and evenly non-absorbing, base to build on.
     
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  11. lineboat

    lineboat Friend of Leo's

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    9BDD5579-C3B0-43BE-9703-5876D531A857.jpeg Here’s how it turned out. I’m fairly happy with it.
     
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  12. esquirestuart

    esquirestuart TDPRI Member

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    That looks great! I love the tint and how the paint has sunk into the grain. Did you apply a clear coat on top of the butterscotch?
     
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