About to give up

Telekarster

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drink a last beer and take your 100$

Yep... been this way since at least the 70's. Everything else has gone up over the decades except gig pay ;) I'm in the studio these days, layin' down tracks for originals, and having a blast. It would take a heck of a lot more than 100 bucks to get me out there giggin' again. I do private venue stuff from time to time, or private parties, that sort of thing but outside of that I'm done with schleppin' my crap all over creation for 100 bucks and a room full of drunken people who want to fall onto my gear and break it LOL!!! no thanks ;)
 

Gene O.

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Sep 20, 2015
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NE Ohio
Like Frank Zappa said, “If you can’t handle adversity, don’t gig.”
It’s not for everyone.
I understand being tired, too.
You can get tired of anything.
I’m a “lifer” because I still enjoy gigging.
If I stop, it will be because :
1. I physically can’t play.
2. No one will hire me.
3. I decide that my playing/singing is no longer good enough.
4. It stops being fun on average.
After 55 years of playing, and 49 years of gigging, I’m still ready, willing and able.
I sincerely hope I have a few more years left.
If not, I loved it, and I’m grateful for my long run.
I hope whatever you decide works out for you.
I guess there are still a few of us that still enjoy playing out... and, to me, if you enjoy something it's worth the effort.

My gigging years is one less than @brookdalebill's. My reasons to no longer play are the same, with an amendment to #4. Case in point: my gig Thursday night was "off" - the crowd and my playing. But last night was fun. Tonight should be fun, too. As some famous guy once said "Two outta three ain't bad".

As for the money, I look at that as an average, too. Our band will play some private parties and a corporate event here and there for good money, then take some low pay jobs just because they're fun. Also, most of my 90-100 gigs in a year are acoustic duo with a girl singer. Many are acoustic trio as well. Those are the money gigs. They help bring that average income up, too.

I am thankful that I never pursued any kind of R&R dream, but rather a diverse repertoire of songs and styles that I can attempt to play. I play with some great musicians and we have fun playing our blend of pop, R&B and classic rock. Sometimes we sound really good, sometimes we make mistakes, but we don't get worked up about it.

Sometimes retired musicians will ask me "Why do you keep playing and dealing with all the lugging and late nights (midnight is the latest we'll play)?" and my reply is "Because I still can". The day may come when I can't (see above). Until that day comes along, I'll continue.
 
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Telecaster88

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I will add, that I did enjoy gigging while I did it, pretty much until the end, which was when my health problems became too difficult to reconcile with being in a rock band. It's a great feeling to get up on stage and plug in. But what I really liked was the feeling of camaraderie with my bandmates. Pulling up to the gig, not really knowing what we were in for, setting up, and then riding out whatever came next, together. It was an adventure.

Like @Awel mentions, there are the issues with alcohol. When my health dived, one of the first things I did to try to help was quit drinking. I had plenty of nights where I was drinking Cokes while everyone around me was getting plastered. Nothing against getting plastered, it was one of my favorite things to do back when I did it, but it soon became apparent that being around drunk people is not that much fun if you're not drunk too.
 

1 21 gigawatts

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Once a hobby is no longer fun to you, it is time to cut back or you will get completely burned out. That happened to me with competitive shooting. It was great fun at first. As my commitment grew, so did my responsibilities. I somehow ended up President of the local club and match director. Having to write the stages, set up the steel, make sure that everyone stayed safe, clean everything up, and make sure that everyone had fun (except me) got to be a second job. When I realized that I dreaded match weekend every month, I had to quit. Life is too short to spend time doing things that don't make you happy. Work should be the only thing that you have to work at...
 

teletimetx

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I still have fun playing live, fact is I do the balance between investment (money, time, stress, …) and gain (not talking money, I have a job in IT, but I am talking about thankfulness and respect), I lose… and even if I enjoy so much being on stage, I am tired of bar environment, I mean, I can enjoy few beers between friends, but when I play, I finish the show with 6-7 beers under my mic stand, I don’t drink them, but my bass player is, and so he get wasted, forget his bass line, tempo or tonality. :( I mean playing in bars is quite unhealthy, it’s difficult to refuse a beer when the audience offers it to you. And even if it was fun when I was 20 now at 47, I am convinced that alcohol is bad for health, physically and mentally. And sadly blues, rock, and metal have let say close relationship with alcohol.
I have seen so many musician friends lost themselves in alcohol:(

My first reaction to this is that you might need a new bass player.

Any venue can be unhealthy, based on your own decisions. I think the general conclusion, based on the experience of hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of people is that too much alcohol is just not good for you. This is not a radical thought - it's well proven. Maybe there are some good treatment programs in Belgium - I hope so for your bass player's sake.

I love playing guitar (does that even need to be said here?) and even more so when I'm playing with other musicians who love playing also. Getting blotto at every gig does not fit that model.

Finding good bass players, however, is not always so easy and the good ones are usually pretty busy. But seems like it would be a worthwhile endeavor. I just moved from Texas to Colorado and have managed to find two, maybe three that have been fun to play with (the two are in bands I'm now playing with) - it took me maybe three, four months.

It's actually none of my business and my apologies in advance to your bass player - but - your interests should be more important to you. Go find the mattentaart bass player you deserve and get back in the game.

my two centimes (centimes?)



Be proactive and positive as mentioned above.
 

Beachbum

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The times they are a changing. I first picked up a guitar in 1965. By 1969 I was playing in club bands in the days when band members didn't have giant egos, venues paid a decent wage and treated you to free beer and a burger. I did that until the end of the 80's when band members began spending more time introducing drama than new material and the venues went to wanting you to do a free audition gig and never called you back. Since the turn of the century it's been guitar slingers looking for instant gratification and open mic's who will only let you play if you buy three beers. Now I just do a solo act with me my acoustic and my harmonica. If someone wants to hear it fine, if not screw em I'm just keeping up my chops for the next life.
 

Awel

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Belgium
My first reaction to this is that you might need a new bass player.

Any venue can be unhealthy, based on your own decisions. I think the general conclusion, based on the experience of hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of people is that too much alcohol is just not good for you. This is not a radical thought - it's well proven. Maybe there are some good treatment programs in Belgium - I hope so for your bass player's sake.

I love playing guitar (does that even need to be said here?) and even more so when I'm playing with other musicians who love playing also. Getting blotto at every gig does not fit that model.

Finding good bass players, however, is not always so easy and the good ones are usually pretty busy. But seems like it would be a worthwhile endeavor. I just moved from Texas to Colorado and have managed to find two, maybe three that have been fun to play with (the two are in bands I'm now playing with) - it took me maybe three, four months.

It's actually none of my business and my apologies in advance to your bass player - but - your interests should be more important to you. Go find the mattentaart bass player you deserve and get back in the game.

my two centimes (centimes?)



Be proactive and positive as mentioned above.
Thanks a lot for your message, indeed for all your messages, I am definitely convinced that forum is still the best place to discuss serious topics, I mean on Facebook I would already have been trolled.
The thing is that alcohol abuse is a sensible subject to talk to someone who’s been changing because of alcohol, when you try to talk about it, he will say that he’s on control, no need to worry.
This is sad.
 

Awel

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Belgium
Gig on your own terms. If it starts to feel like work, change it up or don't gig as often. Sometimes it's just as good to jam with your friends.
This is difficult for me always afraid that gigs organizer think 'who does this guy think he is?’
….
 

Beachbum

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^ Then just tell the blood suckers who you are and ask them who on earth do they think they are. If you're good they need you far more than you need them. Cut out the middle man, go strait to the bar owners, promote yourself and show them how they can save money. Let's face it. We do it for the love of it and it's not like anyone is going to retire off of this stuff.
 
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tweeet

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Oct 2, 2008
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1,299
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england
In the late 90's the gigs were bouncing. Great atmosphere...good landlords and for the time ...good pay (and yes...the pay hasn't increased here either). Gave up solo gigs three years ago as I was playing to practically no one. Would send posters etc but all to no avail as pubs weren't promoting live music and sometimes would put me in a separate room away from punters ! I also cut down the duo gigs from 30 a year to around 16...on my terms, meaning I won't drive more than 30 miles round trip unless I'm getting silly money...I'm not setting up in front of the toilet...my gear is being trashed by drunken idiots, men and women ...I just got fed up !! I play 3-4 regular venues twice to three times a year now in the duo and that's fine for me. Attitudes to live music has changed a lot in the last 25 years here and musicians aren't respected at all I find. I reckon I have another five years before I really and truly pack it in.
 

HootOwlDude

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Wilmington, NC
Years ago I had a band that practiced weekly and played out once in a blue moon. I was our songwriter and lead guy and felt like I contributed and risked more than the other members. I loved it, but found it exhausting, and I got tired of being the one who always had to arrange our get-togethers while most everyone seemed indifferent a lot of the time. I used to do solo acoustic gigs a little bit too, but frankly not all that much, and I loathed playing for drunks even when they really listened. Though my experience is not as extensive as yours, I can totally relate to why you’ve become beleaguered by the whole mess. For the last few years though I’ve been recording stuff basically for my own enjoyment and am probably a better player and songwriter than I’ve ever been. I make sure I always have a little project to hack away at. Friends tell me I ought to start playing out again, but for all the work and likely disappointment it’d take I feel like I’d have to sacrifice all or most of the pleasure I get from creating at home, which by itself takes a lot of desire, time, and effort. Even if you do take a sabbatical of sorts, you can still check a lot of your musician boxes by crafting songs and instrumentals from home. You can always return to live playing if you want.
 




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