A special knife…

LGOberean

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
May 31, 2008
Posts
13,705
Age
69
Location
Corpus Christi, Texas
I’ve been meaning to post this for several days. We’ve talked about knives in this forum before, and this thread is about a knife, in one sense. But really, it’s about a man, and his son, and close friendships.

I’ve mentioned my best friend David before. For five and a half decades, he’s remained the best friend I’ve ever had. We met the first day of school in 1968 and were friends throughout junior and high school. And we stayed friends after high school. I married young; David did a 4-year hitch in the Navy. At times, we lived in different towns in South Texas, but we kept in touch. David married Susan four years and a bit after Beth and me, and our families have always been close. Their youngest daughter didn’t realize we weren’t blood kin until she was about 11 years old.

The other thing I’ve told about David here before is about his leather work. For as long as I’ve known him, David has carved leather. Over the years, I’ve had items he’s made for me and/or my wife: checkbook covers, wallets, belts, holsters, rebound Bibles, a holster for my cell phone, and last but certainly not least, guitar straps.

One thing about our friendship I don’t think I’ve ever talked about here is my relationship with David’s parents. They were young at heart, and very affirming. As I said, Beth and I married young: I was 19, Beth was 18. Back then, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them. They had gotten married even younger than us, and they were very encouraging and affirming.

In 56 days, Beth and I will celebrate our 50th anniversary. But back in 1973, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them, and we loved them for it. We were drawn to them as role models for us. Oh, we each had good parents, who modeled committed marriages and good values. But having other parental figures that demonstrated what married life could be like and who believed in us was huge.

I know…this thread is supposed to be about a knife. And it is, kinda. And I’m getting there, really.

David’s mother passed away in 1999. His dad died in 2021. David has one surviving brother, Richard. (That’s what he goes by now, but I can’t help thinking of him still as little “Ricky.”) Their relationship is a good one, but the settling of their father’s estate has been complicated. There have been a lot of details to address, but now things are getting settled.

A week or so ago, David & Susan came by for a visit. (They no longer live in Corpus, but as in days of old, we keep in touch, no matter what towns were living in.) As we were visiting, David reached in his pocket and pulled out this knife. He said that he thought I might like to have a knife of his dad’s. My reply was simple and immediate: “Absolutely!”

It is a limited edition knife he got after some donation to the NRA. It has the wording of the Second Amendment written on one side of the knife’s handle. That’s very cool to me. it’s also cool that the other side of the knife’s handle has the signature of Theodore Roosevelt. My grandfather was named in part for Theodore Roosevelt.

The knife is in near pristine condition. And sharp? David’s father set great store by being able to shave with a knife’s blade. But all other details about the knife come in a distant second to the fact that it belonged to David’s dad, and that David wanted me to have it. It instantly became my new EDC pocketknife. It is a treasured item, and I feel honored to have something of a man that had such a tremendous impact on my life.

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_dave_

Tele-Meister
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Posts
402
Location
Southern California
Beautiful knife. Even better story.
Thanks for the post.
I think I’ve always had a knife in my pocket far back as I can remember.
But not like yours.
Take care. God bless
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
61,984
Location
Bakersfield
I’ve been meaning to post this for several days. We’ve talked about knives in this forum before, and this thread is about a knife, in one sense. But really, it’s about a man, and his son, and close friendships.

I’ve mentioned my best friend David before. For five and a half decades, he’s remained the best friend I’ve ever had. We met the first day of school in 1968 and were friends throughout junior and high school. And we stayed friends after high school. I married young; David did a 4-year hitch in the Navy. At times, we lived in different towns in South Texas, but we kept in touch. David married Susan four years and a bit after Beth and me, and our families have always been close. Their youngest daughter didn’t realize we weren’t blood kin until she was about 11 years old.

The other thing I’ve told about David here before is about his leather work. For as long as I’ve known him, David has carved leather. Over the years, I’ve had items he’s made for me and/or my wife: checkbook covers, wallets, belts, holsters, rebound Bibles, a holster for my cell phone, and last but certainly not least, guitar straps.

One thing about our friendship I don’t think I’ve ever talked about here is my relationship with David’s parents. They were young at heart, and very affirming. As I said, Beth and I married young: I was 19, Beth was 18. Back then, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them. They had gotten married even younger than us, and they were very encouraging and affirming.

In 56 days, Beth and I will celebrate our 50th anniversary. But back in 1973, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them, and we loved them for it. We were drawn to them as role models for us. Oh, we each had good parents, who modeled committed marriages and good values. But having other parental figures that demonstrated what married life could be like and who believed in us was huge.

I know…this thread is supposed to be about a knife. And it is, kinda. And I’m getting there, really.

David’s mother passed away in 1999. His dad died in 2021. David has one surviving brother, Richard. (That’s what he goes by now, but I can’t help thinking of him still as little “Ricky.”) Their relationship is a good one, but the settling of their father’s estate has been complicated. There have been a lot of details to address, but now things are getting settled.

A week or so ago, David & Susan came by for a visit. (They no longer live in Corpus, but as in days of old, we keep in touch, no matter what towns were living in.) As we were visiting, David reached in his pocket and pulled out this knife. He said that he thought I might like to have a knife of his dad’s. My reply was simple and immediate: “Absolutely!”

It is a limited edition knife he got after some donation to the NRA. It has the wording of the Second Amendment written on one side of the knife’s handle. That’s very cool to me. it’s also cool that the other side of the knife’s handle has the signature of Theodore Roosevelt. My grandfather was named in part for Theodore Roosevelt.

The knife is in near pristine condition. And sharp? David’s father set great store by being able to shave with a knife’s blade. But all other details about the knife come in a distant second to the fact that it belonged to David’s dad, and that David wanted me to have it. It instantly became my new EDC pocketknife. It is a treasured item, and I feel honored to have something of a man that had such a tremendous impact on my life.

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What a beautiful story, and a great looking knife!
 

HaWE

Tele-Holic
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Posts
775
Location
Germany, somewhere from the countryside
I’ve been meaning to post this for several days. We’ve talked about knives in this forum before, and this thread is about a knife, in one sense. But really, it’s about a man, and his son, and close friendships.

I’ve mentioned my best friend David before. For five and a half decades, he’s remained the best friend I’ve ever had. We met the first day of school in 1968 and were friends throughout junior and high school. And we stayed friends after high school. I married young; David did a 4-year hitch in the Navy. At times, we lived in different towns in South Texas, but we kept in touch. David married Susan four years and a bit after Beth and me, and our families have always been close. Their youngest daughter didn’t realize we weren’t blood kin until she was about 11 years old.

The other thing I’ve told about David here before is about his leather work. For as long as I’ve known him, David has carved leather. Over the years, I’ve had items he’s made for me and/or my wife: checkbook covers, wallets, belts, holsters, rebound Bibles, a holster for my cell phone, and last but certainly not least, guitar straps.

One thing about our friendship I don’t think I’ve ever talked about here is my relationship with David’s parents. They were young at heart, and very affirming. As I said, Beth and I married young: I was 19, Beth was 18. Back then, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them. They had gotten married even younger than us, and they were very encouraging and affirming.

In 56 days, Beth and I will celebrate our 50th anniversary. But back in 1973, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them, and we loved them for it. We were drawn to them as role models for us. Oh, we each had good parents, who modeled committed marriages and good values. But having other parental figures that demonstrated what married life could be like and who believed in us was huge.

I know…this thread is supposed to be about a knife. And it is, kinda. And I’m getting there, really.

David’s mother passed away in 1999. His dad died in 2021. David has one surviving brother, Richard. (That’s what he goes by now, but I can’t help thinking of him still as little “Ricky.”) Their relationship is a good one, but the settling of their father’s estate has been complicated. There have been a lot of details to address, but now things are getting settled.

A week or so ago, David & Susan came by for a visit. (They no longer live in Corpus, but as in days of old, we keep in touch, no matter what towns were living in.) As we were visiting, David reached in his pocket and pulled out this knife. He said that he thought I might like to have a knife of his dad’s. My reply was simple and immediate: “Absolutely!”

It is a limited edition knife he got after some donation to the NRA. It has the wording of the Second Amendment written on one side of the knife’s handle. That’s very cool to me. it’s also cool that the other side of the knife’s handle has the signature of Theodore Roosevelt. My grandfather was named in part for Theodore Roosevelt.

The knife is in near pristine condition. And sharp? David’s father set great store by being able to shave with a knife’s blade. But all other details about the knife come in a distant second to the fact that it belonged to David’s dad, and that David wanted me to have it. It instantly became my new EDC pocketknife. It is a treasured item, and I feel honored to have something of a man that had such a tremendous impact on my life.

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What a great story - good to have friends like this !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

bowman

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Sep 15, 2006
Posts
3,928
Location
Massachusetts
You could have left the knife out of that tale, and it still would have been beautiful. Close friends are better than close relatives, because you don’t HAVE to stay with them. You do it out of love.
 

Chicago Matt

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 23, 2014
Posts
3,720
Age
73
Location
Woodstock
I’ve been meaning to post this for several days. We’ve talked about knives in this forum before, and this thread is about a knife, in one sense. But really, it’s about a man, and his son, and close friendships.

I’ve mentioned my best friend David before. For five and a half decades, he’s remained the best friend I’ve ever had. We met the first day of school in 1968 and were friends throughout junior and high school. And we stayed friends after high school. I married young; David did a 4-year hitch in the Navy. At times, we lived in different towns in South Texas, but we kept in touch. David married Susan four years and a bit after Beth and me, and our families have always been close. Their youngest daughter didn’t realize we weren’t blood kin until she was about 11 years old.

The other thing I’ve told about David here before is about his leather work. For as long as I’ve known him, David has carved leather. Over the years, I’ve had items he’s made for me and/or my wife: checkbook covers, wallets, belts, holsters, rebound Bibles, a holster for my cell phone, and last but certainly not least, guitar straps.

One thing about our friendship I don’t think I’ve ever talked about here is my relationship with David’s parents. They were young at heart, and very affirming. As I said, Beth and I married young: I was 19, Beth was 18. Back then, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them. They had gotten married even younger than us, and they were very encouraging and affirming.

In 56 days, Beth and I will celebrate our 50th anniversary. But back in 1973, there were a lot of naysayers about our chances of making it. David’s folks weren’t among them, and we loved them for it. We were drawn to them as role models for us. Oh, we each had good parents, who modeled committed marriages and good values. But having other parental figures that demonstrated what married life could be like and who believed in us was huge.

I know…this thread is supposed to be about a knife. And it is, kinda. And I’m getting there, really.

David’s mother passed away in 1999. His dad died in 2021. David has one surviving brother, Richard. (That’s what he goes by now, but I can’t help thinking of him still as little “Ricky.”) Their relationship is a good one, but the settling of their father’s estate has been complicated. There have been a lot of details to address, but now things are getting settled.

A week or so ago, David & Susan came by for a visit. (They no longer live in Corpus, but as in days of old, we keep in touch, no matter what towns were living in.) As we were visiting, David reached in his pocket and pulled out this knife. He said that he thought I might like to have a knife of his dad’s. My reply was simple and immediate: “Absolutely!”

It is a limited edition knife he got after some donation to the NRA. It has the wording of the Second Amendment written on one side of the knife’s handle. That’s very cool to me. it’s also cool that the other side of the knife’s handle has the signature of Theodore Roosevelt. My grandfather was named in part for Theodore Roosevelt.

The knife is in near pristine condition. And sharp? David’s father set great store by being able to shave with a knife’s blade. But all other details about the knife come in a distant second to the fact that it belonged to David’s dad, and that David wanted me to have it. It instantly became my new EDC pocketknife. It is a treasured item, and I feel honored to have something of a man that had such a tremendous impact on my life.

View attachment 1089177 View attachment 1089178 View attachment 1089179
Great story! Lifted my heart and made my evening. Thanks for posting.
 

telleutelleme

Telefied
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2010
Posts
23,513
Location
Houston
Thank you for sharing. I have a knife that my brother gave me. It was his father-in-law's German Rostfrei Stag Horn. My sister-in-law was from Karlsrue Germany. When my brother passed, he left it to me because he knew at the time I collected knives. It is one of only a few I have kept.
 

Telecastoff1

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Apr 28, 2009
Posts
2,059
Location
Mistake Lake
I have always loved owning and collecting knives of all shapes and sizes. My most cherished knife is a U.S. Marine Corps pocket knife my Uncle carried with him at Okinawa during World War II.
 
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