A question, how proficient are you in English?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Blazer, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    On the internet - and with the aid of a good dictionary - I'm rather good I guess.:cool:

    Live: not equally good, since I seem to forget a lot of words. But that goes for my Norwegian too ... :oops:
     
  2. jlindseyjr

    jlindseyjr Tele-Holic

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    Mia Jensen sings in perfect English and Lasse plays a mean tele.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gO3wj84NXc
     
  3. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Spoken Dutch/Flemish is very similar to English, the languages are very closely related, and therein lies the problem. Spoken Dutch sounds like English and is often intelligible provided it is slow and simple (written is quite different ;) The reverse is probably true. This may lead to a tendency to switch languages mid sentence, or inject native words, not normally a problem due to the aforesaid similarities.

    I do not speak Dutch. My French is passable schoolboy. The problem is lack of practice. Most other Europeans do learn English as a second language to a very high standard because it is de-facto the international language.

    I have never had the slightest problem conversing with Dutch or Flemish speaking people, their English has always been of a very highest standard.

    However London itself now has a very high immigrant population of non-English speaking people.
     
  4. AndyLowry

    AndyLowry Friend of Leo's

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    Speaking in accented English has a benefit: people have to listen more carefully to you. :D

    Speaking of accents, I'm always freaked out to discover that somebody I've just seen in an American movie or TV show is actually from England, Australia, or New Zealand. Idris Elba, Naomi Watts, Jamie Bamber, Ray Stevenson, and Nicole Kidman completely fooled me.
     
  5. jlindseyjr

    jlindseyjr Tele-Holic

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    I never knew Anthony LaPaglia (Without A Trace) was Australian until I heard his accent slip out during an episode I was watching.
     
  6. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

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    Oh yes, it was embarrassingly horrible! And yet it seems accepted that English spoken with a strong French accent is quite charming...

    Indeed. In fact it's said that the closest European language to English is the East Friesian dialect of German/Dutch and that if it hadn't been for the Norman Conquest the English language would sound a bit like that now.

    I'm lucky in being a fairly good mimic and I've been told I speak French, German and to a lesser extent Italian without a discernable English accent. Spanish is a bit tougher; as you say, practice is the key.

    Also Hugh Laurie, Damien Lewis and Nicollette Sheridan (English), Owain Yeoman (Welsh) and Simon Baker (Australian) among others. Not to mention Mel Gibson, which I'm delighted not to do. There was also the late Barry Morse, who played Lt. Gerard in the original "Fugitive" TV drama; he had previously been known for playing Paul Temple in the BBC radio serial.
     
  7. gandsfjord

    gandsfjord Tele-Meister

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    I went to university in Glasgow (Strathclyde) and acquired a distinct Glaswegian accent that took me years to lose. I can still do it, but working for an American company for 20 years has mellowed it down somewhat. So Norwegian with a thick Scottish accent here. Guess we'd need an interpreter :)

    I recently re-read the book Filth by Irvine Welsh. Can still understand the verbatim parts of it. Have to say some of it out loud before I get it though.
     
  8. J-man

    J-man Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    It's my native language and I speak it with a fairly neutral English accent. (Nobody has ever figured out where I'm from in the UK based on my accent alone).

    Do I win some kind of prize?:D
     
  9. choupique

    choupique Tele-Holic

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    Having lived in south Louisiana for the past 35 years I would say not so good.
     
  10. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    a couple years ago i was going to take some college courses and i had to take some pre-entry tests...my essay was above the score needed and said i was above college english level and did not need to take english...the math test on the other had was abysmal...which i knew
     
  11. J-man

    J-man Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    You know Eng Language/Literature classes aren't to teach people how to speak English, right?
     
  12. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    why would you ask me that?
     
  13. J-man

    J-man Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Because I'm not sure what English classes in College have to do with speaking English.:confused:
     
  14. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    they are classes that you relearn grammar mostly i would think
     
  15. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I find that any language barrier can be overcome by shouting louder than the guy you are talking to, and waving your arms about. You really need to watch out for savage behavior from those kind of people who can't understand you no matter how loud you are though. This is a silly thread anyway, Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock went boldly where none of us has ever gone before, and they never encountered anyone who didn't speak perfectly good english, so there.
     
  16. ASC67

    ASC67 Friend of Leo's

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    Same could be said about some Aussie accents and lingo.
     
  17. 4string

    4string Friend of Leo's

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    Hey Blazer, I'm an American of Dutch ancestry, and actually only 2nd generation. My father's parents were both born in the Netherlands. My Grandfather arrived here in his teens, and my Grandmother was 8 years old when she entered the US.

    Both of my grandparents spoke perfect English without a hint of an accent, and yet were fluent in Dutch. They never spoke the old language unless they had visitors from Holland. My father and his sisters were not taught Dutch, so my father doesn't speak a word (neither do I obviously). My grandparents wanted their children to be Americans, and yet instilled a tremendous pride in our heritage at the same time.


    So now I know why they didn't have an accent. Makes perfect sense; the Dutch rule! We are awesome (notice how I said "we"?)! I may be born American, but the Dutchman in me defines me..;)


    BTW, I speak perfect English as befits someone who grew-up in San Jose, CA: people have asked me '...are you from Texas or Oklahoma?'


    :lol:
     
  18. Teleblooz

    Teleblooz Tele-Afflicted

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    My family emigrated to the US from Germany when I was 9. I was at the right age to retain the German language while losing all trace of an accent. Yet somehow, certain perceptive people could always peg me for a foreigner. When I asked them how they could tell, the answer was almost always some variation on "your English is too good". Apparently a dead giveaway was enunciating "-ing" endings (instead of shortening them to -in')
     
  19. 4string

    4string Friend of Leo's

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    I dunno. You pronounced "blues" as blooz. Sounds pretty American to me..




    :lol:
     
  20. lendryesky

    lendryesky Tele-Afflicted

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    I've had this experience too and many times I'm no exception. My theory of why isn't as pessimistic as "we're stupid" but rather due to language shifts combined with the vernacular with which we grow up. When foreign language speakers learn English, they learn all the rules, proper grammar, etc, while learning the language at the same time.

    I do think education in the US has been failing for quite some time now, though.
     
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