A question for non-Americans

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by xtelesquirex, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I'm just putting this out here: EDM has the better dance moves...

     
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  2. tubelectron

    tubelectron Tele-Afflicted

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    We all know that the US music and culture were included in the Marshall plan ! :D

    That said, in the "modern US" music field, Rock, Rock'n'Roll, Soul, Disco have been and still are the most popular genres... Very very few Country music, AFAIK. Or at least, the era as ended for long. The rest comes from UK, Ireland (including traditional Irish music, quite praised here) and the rest of the world.

    Now it seems that every teenager here in France listen (at least for a time) Rap music - French / Algerian Rap mainly o_O, not very different from US rap, and probably even much uglier ! :lol:

    But it's me, OK ? :D

    A+!
     
  3. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well I have no problem with your clarification: some are A but the majority are B.

    That perfectly describes the United States.
    We are united under a single agency yet we are not all the same.
    Almost any popular example of US culture is just one niche, not a universal Americanism.

    Much of the world now looks at the US as one people, with one abhorrent nature.
    I can't say for sure but for example assigning a USA fondness for vigilante justice based on IDK what, is a mistake much like @hemingway was mistaken when he found a Country bar in Glasgow and extrapolated that Glasgow likes Country Music.

    I recall that in the '60s we heard Country hits on the same radio stations as played R&B, Soul, pop, Rock, and a smattering of other fringe styles.
    Then what was Country Music was more anchored in all of us, as it was part of the foundation of the US and made by hard working immigrant/ migrant worker/ sharecropper folk who were literally the backbone of our collective.

    I may be wrong but I think those sharecropper pioneers of country music were more immigrant than mayflower. More foreigner than establishment.
    For those who have no idea why I keep mentioning sharecropper in relation to Country music, I’m gonna leave that learnin up to you!

    After big production and arena venues took over and ran the show for a couple of decades, I'm not sure the resulting new Country was even related to the formation of Country Music.

    Even popular culture at one time was based on some sort of core majority of taste or style.

    Now it seems like pop culture is more of a corporate product foisted on us but not formed by culture at all.

    Corporations are not culture.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2020
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  4. ZenGuitarist

    ZenGuitarist Tele-Holic

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    For me, I love both Alberta beef and K.D. Lang. I'm a very open minded person. :)
     
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  5. gregulator450

    gregulator450 Tele-Afflicted

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    I am with you on both points. :D
     
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  6. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Tele-Afflicted

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    I would agree and emphasise, that while many folks vary in interesting ways around the world:

    From where I stand, it is obvious that the media/news exaggerates and exposes a very poor presentation of any of the people I have lived around or known in my 60 years. And without exception, everyone I know is appalled at what much of the world must think of us.
    It does not even vaguely resemble the reality I know.
     
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  7. Cloodie

    Cloodie Tele-Meister

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    Obviously when discussing a small city and a large country we're referencing different things. There's no region or area within Glasgow where country is big but there can be within a large country. The post I replied to was talking about being out in Glasgow on a Saturday night and how they love their country but I've honestly never been in any bar in Glasgow where there's been country music playing or a country themed bar and I've never met anyone who's into country. Even the club that I posted about is something that you wouldn't exactly recognise as in anyway a modern country club. It's more of a historic venue with a dwindling crowd who are generally into the Western part of C&W music. There will be people there dressed as cowboys, native Americans, there's shootouts, bingo! and line dancing.
     
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  8. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well while we struggle to define "Country" we can also struggle to define "Popular American (X)".

    I'm born in the USA to an immigrant Mother, I currently run no less than three net surfing devices, connected to pop culture in most of the usual ways while working in a destination location frequented by folks from all over the US, Canada and the rest of the world.

    But I've never heard of Thomas Rhett?

    Does that make it fringe/ niche music?
    Or does his paycheck make his music popular?

    How about Barney the purple dinosaur?
    Is he to be considered an icon of popular American music?

    I'd bet Barney is a more popular singer of American music than Rhett!
    More iconic too.
    Maybe even a defining Americanism.
     
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  9. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    If we are talking about a strict equivalent, of people singing about stuffs other people can relate to while being artistically relevant we have jacques brel from belgium or these folks


    It is interesting to notice that folky genres of music are associated with regions. So the folk music in the north will be different about the one in the east or west, because folks had not the same problems.
     
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  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm no mathematician but I'd be interested to see the numbers:

    The population of Glasgow.
    The number of Glasgowans who like that fringe bar.
    vs
    The population of the US.
    The number of Americans who like (for the sake of using stats to manipulate information) Country music that promotes vigilante justice and drinking with Jesus.

    Or put another way, how many bar going fans of live music in Glasgow know about that bar?
    vs
    How many fans of live music in the US know about Thomas Rhett and Brantley Gilbert?

    Then how about the number of US music fans who know The Pogues, The Dropkick Murphy's and Ewan McColl?
    Or maybe when referencing music of other eras we need to reference fans of those other eras?

    Maybe look at Americans connection to both McColl and Woody Guthrie.
    Why would we like "foreign musicians" like McColl?
    Because we are all foreign here?
    No, gotta be some other factor.
    The universal appeal of certain music?
    Or the size (and population) of the pond, the size of the fish, and the effort made by the pond to promote the fish?

    For me it's conventions that need examination.
    Our method and tendency to define?
    Does it need to be redefined?
    Or are we good?
     
  11. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    What do you mean "Americana", like the Stones singing about being in the US, or folky stuff about traveling or being in the US? I doubt it's popular all over Europe.

    I have heard French music about places in the US, which made the annoying choruses in English that are often used in cheesy French music have a reason.

    Cheesy choruses in English are popular in a lot of countries, not sure the American themes are that widespread.
     
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  12. Oxidao

    Oxidao TDPRI Member

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    I agree Sitges you about “country music“.
    B-b but, are you sirious on “the civil war “ statement???
    Of course ir doesn’t. At least here in Spain, neither (i bet) in any other country that has had it’s own.
     
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  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Can’t see the video in the US.

    Interesting though your comment about different regions a country not having the same problems.

    Could be that when Country music sprang up in the US, we really all had close to the same problems due to the US being so brand new in country age.
     
  14. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    What i meant is that people in the north had industrial problems, just like you coal mine songs.
    Maybe a guy in the south had problems growing up vegetables, or corn, just like your growing up sutffs was hard during the dustbowl area.

    What i can't really think of is the equivalent of truck driving / railroad songs.
    John henry, phantom 309 and so on. I think the railroad workers had it way too easy to write any songs here. And it keeps going to this day. You can't write a song about no trains if you are the ones on strike. I am pretty sure there were a few customer songs about them though. ;)
     
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  15. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    KPop is hugely popular around the world and they slip an english word or phrase into nearly every sentence. I got no problem with it!



     
  16. suave eddie

    suave eddie Tele-Afflicted

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    Yep, you ain't seen nothin' till you've seen a Japanese C&W band decked out in full regalia.

     
  17. bendercaster

    bendercaster Tele-Afflicted

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    There were some Eurovision Song Contest broadcasts a few years ago (maybe starting in 2014?) that had a number of Americana acts with cowboy hats, suspenders, fiddles, etc. One of them, I think it was the Dutch entry, even had the second or third highest number of votes one of those years. I don't know what to extrapolate from that--just putting it out there.
     
  18. johnny k

    johnny k Poster Extraordinaire

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    This band has been playing for 30 years. I like a few of their early records, and appreciate what they do for french rock and roll. But i liked them when they were more on the psychobilly side.



    same band, a good 20 years earlier.
     
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  19. Cloodie

    Cloodie Tele-Meister

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    Glasgow has a population of 600,000, if you include the surrounding area that number would go up a good bit further. I'd reckon that club doesn't get more than 100 people on a Saturday night which is tiny in comparison to the numbers that would be out in other bars and clubs. So definitely not a place where people 'love their country' as was claimed.
     
  20. Art VanDelay

    Art VanDelay Tele-Afflicted

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    I was stationed in Germany for a while and they LOVE the American cowboy aesthetic. I saw cigarette ads at train stations with Marlboro man knock offs (made me nostalgic).
     
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