A question for non-Americans

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by xtelesquirex, Sep 15, 2020 at 9:42 AM.

  1. DesertTwang

    DesertTwang NEW MEMBER!

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    I wasn't familiar with this song, but I looked up the lyrics, and being a German national who's lived in the US since 2005, I can tell you that this song is a very "American" song in the sense that vigilante justice is largely frowned upon in Europe, as are parking lot brawls in general. It's not really something that's part of our collective culture the way it is here in the States.
     
  2. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Afflicted

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    Hence the F-Troop reference to avoid confusion!

    :D
     
  3. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Australian country music is alive and well.... has it's own flavour, too...

    it must be connected with wide open dusty places with lots of cows, trucks and stuff, I guess.. ;)
     
  4. xtelesquirex

    xtelesquirex Tele-Meister

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    This ties into what someone was saying earlier; that country music tends to be at odds with European values. A sentiment I agree with.

    I'm still a bit puzzled about how we departed from our native countries' customs and became cowboys, but like so many things American - well, let's just leave it at when I started traveling I realised many stereotypes of Americans are quite true. I'd trade all my teles for a chance to warn my great grandparents not to leave Europe. However, I feel like I might be tip-toeing into a sensitive subject so I'll keep this about music.

    Germany is well known for its contribution to guitar music with companies like H&K, Engl, Duesenberg, Framus, Hofner, Hohner...Probably others that I'm forgetting as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2020 at 8:07 PM
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  5. koen

    koen Friend of Leo's

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    Another term is Alt Country. Bands like Wilco, Uncle Tupelo, Jayhawks, and singers like Gram Parsons, Townes van Zandt, Lucinda Williams, John Hiatt.
     
  6. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    Cool thread! The folk roots of what we think of as "American Country Music" are explored in the first episode of Ken Burns' documentary Country Music. Basically you could say it's just one more version of the rural American musical stew that combined European instruments and folk traditions (Mandolin, major scale, harmonies) with re-invented instruments and folk traditions from Africa (Banjo, playing around with scales and tonalities, etc). The stuff that was a little more African ended up being called Blues and eventually Jazz, and the stuff that was a little more whitebread ended up being called Country and Bluegrass. Initially it was all just "Hillbilly music" until marketers got hold of it. Then the two "genres" got marketed to white and black audiences differently and further evolved from there.

    I have heard some fine country music (by which I mean, it sounds like it comes from the American south) out of Australia and of course Canada. Not anywhere else. The idea that it doesn't appeal to Brits is interesting to me - what, they don't drink too much, their wives never cheat, dogs don't get run over?
     
  7. RhinestoneStrat

    RhinestoneStrat Tele-Meister

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    I know a lot of 'Mericans love their women country-style.:)

    [​IMG]

     
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  8. xtelesquirex

    xtelesquirex Tele-Meister

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    Haven't you heard? Women love tractors! :lol:
     
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  9. Lef T

    Lef T Tele-Holic

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    My girlfriend is American.
    I am Canadian and live in Ontario.
    Funny thing is we were talking about Alberta today.
    She asked about K.D. Laing and what songs was she well known for.
    She knew that K.D. was from Alberta.
    I had to fill her in though,on the time that K.D. decided to take her anti meat stance.
     
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  10. Warren Pederson

    Warren Pederson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    there's a huge world of honky tonk in Europe, it's been going for 50 years and is gaining momentum. This is my favorite band right now. They are from Sweden and don't even speak English,
     
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  11. Warren Pederson

    Warren Pederson Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    here's another
     
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  12. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Tele-Afflicted

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    Whats to apologize for? Nice folk tune. :D

    Stuart

    Sheesh.:cool:

    No, No, No!
    but I give up.
     
  13. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Tele-Afflicted

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    So...
    As always when this subject gets a thread, I ask...

    What is "Country music"?

    My interpretation is gonna be different than many others.

    And refining the OP's question would rely on the answer to that I think.

    And for those here who like Teles but persistently bash "country" music wholesale...
    You baffle me. You are a fan of an instrument best known for a twangy sound and highly versatile utility, yet you hate on one of the most popular styles where its voice is ubiquitous...

    But then to me, "real" country music has no amplifiers. Or drums.
    So theres that...

    And for the OP, if its serious question, I've dug very good bands from all over the place that could be considered "Country" or some derivative thereof.
    I like many kinds of music, from many parts of the world.

    Random example:

    https://www.kristycox.com
     
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  14. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Friend of Leo's

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    My assumption was that we were talking about the music played by the likes of Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Emmylou Harris, Ricky Skaggs… stretching to Western swing (Bob Wills, Asleep at the Wheel, Time Jumpers, Hot Club of Cowtown), folk-rock (Graham Parsons, Flying Burrito Bros, Byrds) extending to more modern stuff like Brad Paisley, or even (God forbid) Garth Brooks. Maybe including bluegrass. It's big, but if you say "jazz" or "rock" you sure ain't looking at more homogeneous genres!

    And BTW my answer was to the question: is all of that popular outside of America? AFAIK it's not, not in Europe. It does not mean that I don't like the music personally. I can't stand the stuff that passes for "modern" country but I'm transcribing Jimmy Bryant stuff right now (man, the challenge), and I am a huge fan of guitarists like Vince Gill, Albert Lee, Redd Volkaert, Marty Stuart (sheesh), Junior Barnard, Roy Nichols and so many others. And Jason Loughlin – I thought I would do well to mention to this wider and appreciative audience the soft-spoken genius of country guitar education ;D

    PS: talking music genres the guy singing about an "ass whopping in the parking lot" considered "country" in the USA? I fail to see the connection. To me it's (bad) hard rock… Bon Jovi wannabe.
     
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  15. bendercaster

    bendercaster Tele-Afflicted

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    Stereotypes are lazy logic. I do think Country music is uniquely American, but the USA isn't the only country that had cowboys. And Americans aren't the only people attracted to the themes and musical style of Country music.

    Edit: Have you ever listened to Muswell Hillbillies? I think it came out in 1971. The Kinks made some of the most uniquely British rock music in the 60s and 70s compared to their contemporaries, but it is what I imagine English Country music, if such a genre exists, sounds like.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2020 at 2:25 AM
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  16. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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  17. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    That would have been me ;)

    Societies and cultures don't stand still.

    The United States is a young country. The cultural shifts you describe happened in Europe too, they just happened earlier.
     
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  18. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well remember that time is different in the 250 yo US compared to the 2500 yo countries in Europe.

    Look back to public disembowelments or whatever the local landowner/ king/ bishop/ not democratically elected leader; organized for undesirables, it probably continued for a larger portion of Europe's history than for US history.
    We really lucked out when we missed the middle ages here!

    Or maybe I'm wrong and public violence is an American invention like Jazz and Blues?
    And maybe some parts of the US still have prevalent vigilante justice?
    Not counting Florida man of course...
     
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  19. notmyusualuserid

    notmyusualuserid Friend of Leo's

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    Have you ever heard of 'pastiche'? ;)

    Muswell Hillbillies (Muswell Hill is an area of London where the Davies brothers grew up) didn't sell too well, as it goes.

    'Village Green Preservation Society' is more what British Country would sound like. it's full of quintessentially British cultural references.
     
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  20. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Ahhh how often we confuse things that can be found in America with things that define the USA.

    If Brantley represents "American" then I guess I'm non American.

    As for Euro equivalents of glorified violence, how about soccer hooligans and public stonings?

    My wife was wearing a Pogues t shirt today, how bout them?
    Maybe we all have different definitions of violence?
     
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