A Positive Story

El Serio

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Here's a story that played out at our house this weekend:

Last Friday evening there was a carnival of sorts at my son's junior high. He was particularly excited about the raffle, because a Lego set was one of the prizes. He took a couple dollars and got a few tickets. While there my son noticed that one of his friends had given all his tickets to his 5 year old brother who really had his hopes up to win the same Lego set.
Time for the drawing came and when neither of them won, my son noticed how disappointed the 5 year old was.
Later that evening my son proposed the idea of taking his money that he earned mowing the lawn and raking leaves to buy a Lego set for his friend's little brother.
The next morning we headed to the local Wal Mart, where my son located the exact same set that had been in the raffle, we couldn't see the price, but I warned him that it might take his whole $50 to get it. He was good with it, so off we went to the register, where we discovered that it was on some super "week before the week before black Friday pricing": $20 + tax. Out the door we went, and my son began planning how he would give the 5 year old boy his first Lego set.

We weren't able to make a connection on Saturday, so the whole day there was a Christmas Eve type anticipation in the house. On Sunday afternoon when he made the delivery, he came back to the car beaming. He excitedly told me that the little boy told him "I've been wanting my own Lego set for hundreds of years!"

Yesterday he came home from school thrilled to report on how much fun his friend had helping his little brother put them together.

It's great to see a kid discover the joy of making some on else's day. All his own idea.

Who's got any other positive stories to share?
 

Killing Floor

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My younger kid has been playing his main sport pretty seriously since 2nd grade. In his last game in 8th grade he was racing toward the goal late in the game with a easy line to score. He made a single dodge and faked at the goalkeeper and stopped. He made a soft pass to another kid and picked the defender, the boy shot and scored. Right away the kid’s mom screamed and the team celebrated like they won something special. Meanwhile the coach yelled at my son for risking the game by not taking his shot.
My kid says “Jack has never scored a goal and I wanted him to know he could do it.”
What’s funny is he’s a senior now and choosing between multiple scholarship offers and the 2 boys have been friends all through high school. This competitive kid stopped his shot to let someone else take the glory, someone who never took one before and has never played a sport since. To my son it is still one of his proudest sports moments. Egging someone into taking “a” shot has become his favorite shot.

Kids make the right choices more than you think.
 

El Serio

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My younger kid has been playing his main sport pretty seriously since 2nd grade. In his last game in 8th grade he was racing toward the goal late in the game with a easy line to score. He made a single dodge and faked at the goalkeeper and stopped. He made a soft pass to another kid and picked the defender, the boy shot and scored. Right away the kid’s mom screamed and the team celebrated like they won something special. Meanwhile the coach yelled at my son for risking the game by not taking his shot.
My kid says “Jack has never scored a goal and I wanted him to know he could do it.”
What’s funny is he’s a senior now and choosing between multiple scholarship offers and the 2 boys have been friends all through high school. This competitive kid stopped his shot to let someone else take the glory, someone who never took one before and has never played a sport since. To my son it is still one of his proudest sports moments. Egging someone into taking “a” shot has become his favorite shot.

Kids make the right choices more than you think.
That's exactly the kind of story I was hoping to hear. There are so many legitimate worries we can have about our kids and the future, but we need to remember to celebrate their good choices. When they learn to think of others' happiness first, I think they learn a key to finding fulfillment in life.
 

Killing Floor

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Back at ya.
Look up Miracle League if you’ve never heard of it. The NW Austin local chapter is entirely staffed by middle school and high school kids. Nothing but positive stories for days. There is a lot to be hopeful about young people today.
 

cat dude

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Thats Great!Very nice Boy You have.Thank You for Posting.What goes around,comes around!Good job!
 

G.Rotten

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CoolsVille
Here's a story that played out at our house this weekend:

Last Friday evening there was a carnival of sorts at my son's junior high. He was particularly excited about the raffle, because a Lego set was one of the prizes. He took a couple dollars and got a few tickets. While there my son noticed that one of his friends had given all his tickets to his 5 year old brother who really had his hopes up to win the same Lego set.
Time for the drawing came and when neither of them won, my son noticed how disappointed the 5 year old was.
Later that evening my son proposed the idea of taking his money that he earned mowing the lawn and raking leaves to buy a Lego set for his friend's little brother.
The next morning we headed to the local Wal Mart, where my son located the exact same set that had been in the raffle, we couldn't see the price, but I warned him that it might take his whole $50 to get it. He was good with it, so off we went to the register, where we discovered that it was on some super "week before the week before black Friday pricing": $20 + tax. Out the door we went, and my son began planning how he would give the 5 year old boy his first Lego set.

We weren't able to make a connection on Saturday, so the whole day there was a Christmas Eve type anticipation in the house. On Sunday afternoon when he made the delivery, he came back to the car beaming. He excitedly told me that the little boy told him "I've been wanting my own Lego set for hundreds of years!"

Yesterday he came home from school thrilled to report on how much fun his friend had helping his little brother put them together.

It's great to see a kid discover the joy of making some on else's day. All his own idea.

Who's got any other positive stories to share?
Sounds like a parenting win too!!
 

RoscoeElegante

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TooFarFromCanada
Great thread! Thanks for it, El Serio.

We're visiting my oldest daughter here in Chicago. Her building's super lives right below her. Alone, elderly, awkward socially, quite deaf so we hear his rare phone conversations and his nightly "Bonanza" shows. (When she moved in, he hopefully asked her, "Do you like 'Bonanza'?") Never seems to have anyone over to his place. No dog, no cat....

As I was cooking our Thanksgiving meal, my youngest son asked if we could assemble a big plate for the super, who didn't seem to have any family or friends over as supper time neared. A few moments later, his big brother came into the kitchen to ask the same. When we were ready, my sons and daughter volunteered to bring the food down to the super's door, and lingered there, chatting with him, intent on making him laugh or at least smile. We rather selfishly didn't invite him up to join us, which would have been the fully kind thing to do. We wanted that occasion to just ourselves, as we convene only a few times a year now that this daughter moved from Richmond, VA, to Chicago. Even so, I was impressed by my sons' kindness. The homeless here, which aren't as numerous as we had dreaded, given the numbers we saw in the summer and fall, really disturb them. They want to help, but knowing that many of the homeless would misuse the help for booze or drugs puts my sons in knots. The youngest son (15) has long wanted to be a social worker, so he's eager to directly help.

The oldest (17), who's now hoping to become an environmental engineer, is always leery of how help can be enabling in disguise. He volunteers in our town, and loves to help when he can be sure that help is that, and not roundabout harm. On our drive here, as we were paying for our food at a West Virginia Subway, a social worker behind us in line was digging in her purse to ensure that she could pay for her client's unexpectedly large order. With one glance, I knew that my oldest wanted me to cover that for them, and that he'd offer to pay me back out of his hard-earned Kroger-job savings for college. Both sons are always alert to deserving people struggling to make do, and deeply value others' generosity of spirit, especially when means are thin.

Meanwhile, my oldest daughter helps coordinate cardiac care at a children's hospital, and my youngest just switched from several years as a delivery room nurse to coordinating preventive health care for mostly elderly and poor patients. So I'm really proud that compassion and doing society genuine good drives their values and career ambitions.

Even if they did stiff me on helping with the dishes and cleaning up the kitchen....

When your kids are kind, it really gives your parenting years a big hug, and your looming mortality a bit less of an edge.
 
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Wrighty

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Here's a story that played out at our house this weekend:

Last Friday evening there was a carnival of sorts at my son's junior high. He was particularly excited about the raffle, because a Lego set was one of the prizes. He took a couple dollars and got a few tickets. While there my son noticed that one of his friends had given all his tickets to his 5 year old brother who really had his hopes up to win the same Lego set.
Time for the drawing came and when neither of them won, my son noticed how disappointed the 5 year old was.
Later that evening my son proposed the idea of taking his money that he earned mowing the lawn and raking leaves to buy a Lego set for his friend's little brother.
The next morning we headed to the local Wal Mart, where my son located the exact same set that had been in the raffle, we couldn't see the price, but I warned him that it might take his whole $50 to get it. He was good with it, so off we went to the register, where we discovered that it was on some super "week before the week before black Friday pricing": $20 + tax. Out the door we went, and my son began planning how he would give the 5 year old boy his first Lego set.

We weren't able to make a connection on Saturday, so the whole day there was a Christmas Eve type anticipation in the house. On Sunday afternoon when he made the delivery, he came back to the car beaming. He excitedly told me that the little boy told him "I've been wanting my own Lego set for hundreds of years!"

Yesterday he came home from school thrilled to report on how much fun his friend had helping his little brother put them together.

It's great to see a kid discover the joy of making some on else's day. All his own idea.

Who's got any other positive stories to share?

The decent ones aren’t newsworthy, doom, gloom and ‘the yoof of today’, apparently, are. Good on your lad.
 
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