A neat grid story.

imwjl

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This Crowd Science episode brought @Obsessed and @Buckocaster51 to mind immediately. All the concepts and ideas got on my radar years ago when I was on a city council committee that addressed our local grid changes. I've pointed out those solar, wind and manure digesters in electric vehicle discussions here.

If nothing else, consider how this is life changing for some areas in the world.

I've wondered if our cabin could be off grid, but it seems like it might need cooperation with neighbors.

Video Preview of episode also available from built in Apple Podcasts many have.



The whole episode.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1pr4
 

Recce

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Tdpri has a member who lives off grid and has power from hydro from a small creek running across his property. He has said in the past he can only use his amp when the area has had ample rainfall. I would like to hear his opinion.
Having three separate methods to make electricity looks like it is working. I have thought about solar panels.
 

Buckocaster51

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This Crowd Science episode brought @Obsessed and @Buckocaster51 to mind immediately. All the concepts and ideas got on my radar years ago when I was on a city council committee that addressed our local grid changes. I've pointed out those solar, wind and manure digesters in electric vehicle discussions here.

If nothing else, consider how this is life changing for some areas in the world.

I've wondered if our cabin could be off grid, but it seems like it might need cooperation with neighbors.

Video Preview of episode also available from built in Apple Podcasts many have.



The whole episode.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1pr4


That is interesting.

I firmly believe we have only just begun. (There may be a song title in there somewhere!)
 

Obsessed

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Almost 25 years off the grid with my homemade micro hydro plant. Fantastic advice from the people interviewed in the BBC story. I have given tours to countless people and groups of high school students. As a retired engineer, I can explain the process in any amount of detail depending on the audience. To place it in perspective though, I must say that over that 25 years, the world has gone the wrong direction regarding alternative energy. I’m very dismayed about it, especially after the meeting in Scotland a few months ago. I compare it to the failed recycling movement that also went the wrong direction. I was very optimistic for a long time, but that is gone now. We have had a solid 35 years to convert, but alas, we are just scratching the surface too little too late. Sorry for the bummer news, but everyone has been in denial. Opportunity missed.:( I have restored our privately held forest now, so we are now certified for scrubbing the atmosphere of carbon dioxide for seven average U.S. homes … which is probably an entire tribe’s village in parts of the world.
8C1BFCCE-F4B4-4770-8E35-79498D8C11E1.jpeg
 

wblynch

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The cheapest and greenest alternative energy is to use less. I’m still on-grid at home but 30 years ago our house averaged 600 kWh a month and now it’s 320. That’s almost all due to improved lighting, and appliances over the years along with more judicious use.

also for vehicle use, I don’t take jobs more than 15 miles from home anymore. Whereas I used to commonly drive 150 miles a day for work. Of course our kids are grown now so maximum income isn’t the driver it was.

next year I will put solar on the house and reduce my dependence even more.

None of this is hard.
 

Obsessed

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The cheapest and greenest alternative energy is to use less. I’m still on-grid at home but 30 years ago our house averaged 600 kWh a month and now it’s 320. That’s almost all due to improved lighting, and appliances over the years along with more judicious use.

also for vehicle use, I don’t take jobs more than 15 miles from home anymore. Whereas I used to commonly drive 150 miles a day for work. Of course our kids are grown now so maximum income isn’t the driver it was.

next year I will put solar on the house and reduce my dependence even more.

None of this is hard.
You are absolutely correct. The greenest alternative is to use less. That is a great transition that you have taken and for sure there is no big sacrifice. I suspect very little change in your lifestyle. 10 KWh per day is smokin’ good for still being on the grid. Congrats. We are at 2.4 KWH at maximum as a comparison.
 

trev333

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thank you, Sun...:)

haven't paid a power bill since these went on a decade ago... paid for themselves after a few years and generate grid feed power for a premium as well... all money in my pocket now...:)

A good battery bank would be handy... and an E car...;)

solar panels1.jpg
 

Larry F

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For complex reasons, I have left my Quinn ODS on for about 4 years, now. I have paralysis plus arthritis issues, so I have tried to remove as many barriers to making music as I can. Additionally, I am curious and have come to appreciate a little wrong-headedness in my style. I play throughout the day and night anyway.

I guess this is a pretty non-green thing to do. But, hey, I can't drive anymore.
 

Obsessed

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For complex reasons, I have left my Quinn ODS on for about 4 years, now. I have paralysis plus arthritis issues, so I have tried to remove as many barriers to making music as I can. Additionally, I am curious and have come to appreciate a little wrong-headedness in my style. I play throughout the day and night anyway.

I guess this is a pretty non-green thing to do. But, hey, I can't drive anymore.
Just to let people know about power consumption of amps. S.S. Amps don’t use their maximum wattage until they are pretty much dimed, whereas a tube amp uses it’s maximum wattage regardless of volume level. Leaving anything on is a waste. I wired our house with lots of switches for outlets. This helps reduce phantom loads too. Anything with a lit LED when off is burning power 24/7. Your LED stove, TV, Wi-Fi, router, desktop computers are all using electricity when off. It is not much, but multiply the number of units worldwide and it becomes huge. Something that could have been done 35 years ago.
 
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imwjl

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Not everybody is in denial

;)

True.

The cheapest and greenest alternative energy is to use less. I’m still on-grid at home but 30 years ago our house averaged 600 kWh a month and now it’s 320. That’s almost all due to improved lighting, and appliances over the years along with more judicious use.

also for vehicle use, I don’t take jobs more than 15 miles from home anymore. Whereas I used to commonly drive 150 miles a day for work. Of course our kids are grown now so maximum income isn’t the driver it was.

next year I will put solar on the house and reduce my dependence even more.

None of this is hard.

Yes. Even without extreme or unconventional measures we've been able to cut what I'll call our foot print. A few things that are killer for electricity in our home are teenagers, my IT profession and work from home, and our food and gardening.

There are times when my wife has plants growing inside and orchids are a hobby. I'm sure our deep freeze is not ideal but it also helps fewer grocery trips and less commercial food.

IT gear that's upped electricity use has cut car trips to my work sites, and has made bicycle commuting an option more often. I believe going from using an automobile 6-7 days a week to 1-3 is positive.

It's hard to quantify like the utility bill or what we're not spending at gas pump but I believe there's a health benefit in the ways we've moved to. It's kind of like having what the doc or health club prescribes without that cost or wasted time.

The biggie is more municipalities should pursue what ours and the neighboring large city have done.
 

Engine Swap

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Back in the 70s, my uncle had a cabin in the Trinity Mountains that was off-grid. He had a turbine in a fast-running stream that charged a shack full of truck batteries. He used an inverter to get AC power. He was able to run an electric organ off that. He also had a HAM rig to chat with his WWII buddies.
 




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