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A Little Lesson on Major Triad Inversions

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by RedRobe, Feb 26, 2021.

  1. RedRobe

    RedRobe TDPRI Member

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    Hey guys,

    I just discovered that I've been posting to a wrong section

    First of all thank you for such kind words and constructive criticism on my "Funk Guitar Riffs" tutorial I posted last week!

    This time I decided to record a little lesson on Major Triad inversions on the guitar and how you can use them to play basic chord progressions and make them sound a little different.

    I hope it'll be useful for some of you. I also added TABs on the screen for each example.



    Thank you for watching and have a great day! :)
     
    thebowl, Jim622, ndcaster and 2 others like this.
  2. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl Tele-Meister

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    Hi RedRobe!
    Quick question: Is there a popular song where this is used?
    Cheers - Buzzgrowl
     
  3. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

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    Nice job!
     
  4. RedRobe

    RedRobe TDPRI Member

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    Hello there and thanks for the question.

    Sure, there are plenty of them. For example if you think about John Mayer's "Heart Of Life", the main pattern is very similar to what I'm showing in one of the examples. Or if you think of "Crazy Train" by Ozzy Osbourne, in the verse the guitar is playing 2nd inversion of A, root position of E and 1st inversion of D (but always with the open A string as a pedal tone). Jamiroquai's "Cosmic Girl": the main guitar riff is based on 2nd inversions of G, A and B triads (by the way, I covered this one in my previous video).

    I hope it helps!

    Cheers,
    Feodor
     
    Buzzgrowl likes this.
  5. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    What RedRobe is showing is 3 forms of the same ROOT chord, without knowing them we will be stuck in a single position. The video presentation is clear and excellent.
    Years back these forms were referred to as Form I, Form II and Form III , I believe it was Mel Bay who defined them, at least thats what they were called when I was studying.

    Someone asked about what songs ( solo's) use these positions

    answer- probably all of them !

    When we are familiar with the voicings of these positions, we can HEAR them in much of the music and SOLOS we listen to and want to study/learn . This is the magic and beauty of the guitar fretboard and tuning . It answers the question of why the 2nd string is NOT tuned to the 4th of the 3rd string . ( B instead of C )


    If we happen to be playing a Blues solo off the 5th fret ( "A" chord barred) then find ourselves going UP the fretboard to the 9th/10th fret region , why does that work, why do all the notes seamlessly connect ? Easy. We are now playing in the next TRIAD FORM of "A" off the 9th fret. Many never ask why, they just know it works. Then we continue to the 14th fret area, it still works. We are now in another triad form of the "A" chord"

    Theoretically each of the scales for these varied voicings , as stated by RedRobe, start on a different degree of the SAME SCALE. Its not a new scale, just a continuation from a different fretboard location. Its the beauty of the guitar tuning. Its not magic, all it takes a is some study to understand that all we are doing is moving the root scale up the fretboard which also is a new location of the triad. Its not an accident !

    Everyone plays an "A" chord on the 2nd fret, its referred to as a simple cowboy chord. Well, fret 2 and fret 14, are the same thing.

    If we happen to be studying the B Bender guitar, these varied root potions are basically mandatory or we will be stuck in a single position.

    Excellent video presentation . First study and learn the fretboard positions, the songs will follow . Its not the other way around.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2021
    Jim622 likes this.
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