A little clay?

peteb

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Apr 25, 2003
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Cascadia
I became interested in the hydrology of clay and became interested in locating clay.

one key in locating clay is that clay has the smallest particles and will stay suspended in liquid the longest.

I am currently testing suspension in various samples.

from least clay to most clay

yard dirt

yard dirt with a little moon dust

clay like substance taken from a local shallow excavation

clay taken from a deep local steam bed.
2C1FEB14-22FA-4E7B-9115-EBF475D844A2.jpeg
BC0A7568-C780-4C5E-8ABC-F54F6B17AFA4.jpeg
 

peteb

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Apr 25, 2003
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Cascadia
And, why clay?

I was originally looking how clay affects the water table.

looking into clay,

clay is the oldest ceramic material.

every population had clay.

50% of the worlds population resides in a clay structure.

I reason that it is the first cooking vessel. The wine bag was an earlier vessel, but not a cooking vessel.

and let’s not forget Cassius Clay, the greatest heavy weight boxer of all time, also known as Mohamed Ali.
 

Harry Styron

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Aug 2, 2011
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Branson, Mo
I helped my little son with a science project in elementary school. We took soil samples along 21st Street in Tulsa about every 500 feet, starting at the Arkansas River and walking east to Utica Square. We looked at the size of the grains of dirt and noticed that they became smaller as we got farther east away from the river, as we gained about 100 feet in elevation. It also gave me an opportunity to teach my son to interpret contour maps.

My theory was that the soil was blown by wind from the expansive sandbars in the riverbed by the prevailing west winds and that the larger, heavier particles from the sandbars settled sooner.

The science fair judges seemed to have determined that my son‘s father had a larger role in the project than he should have (though the son doesn’t know how he first learned about contour maps). Thirty-three years later my son remembers nothing about the project, which lends support to the judges‘ conclusion.
 
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Nightclub Dwight

Friend of Leo's
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Aug 12, 2016
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2,630
Location
Pittsburgh
I became interested in the hydrology of clay and became interested in locating clay.

one key in locating clay is that clay has the smallest particles and will stay suspended in liquid the longest.

I am currently testing suspension in various samples.

from least clay to most clay

yard dirt

yard dirt with a little moon dust

clay like substance taken from a local shallow excavation

clay taken from a deep local steam bed. View attachment 987124 View attachment 987125
Serious question. Where did you get the moon dust? Or is that just a code word for something else?
 

edvard

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May 15, 2016
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Location
Bremerton, WA
I know from personal observance that one material that stays in suspension for a very long time is glacial flour. When we (me, wife, and young son) were camping on Mt Rainier many years back, I filled a glass from the river that ran by the campsite to show my son how the silt would precipitate from the water if it was let alone for a while. It was translucent white from all the glacial flour, resembling thinned milk. I left the glass on the picnic table the entire camping trip, which was 3-1/2 days. At the end of the camping trip there was a very thin layer of precipitate at the bottom of the glass, and the water still just as white as the first day. Crazy.
 

dlew919

Doctor of Teleocity
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Aug 6, 2012
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11,140
Location
Sydney
Sydney is built on a clay foundation - any Sydney home owner (or not owner but resident) can tell you about the movement of houses that cause cracks. Of course recently some planning decisions haven't gone so well, and some places have needed to be evacuated. But you know a Sydney house by the cracks...
 

Kandinskyesque

Tele-Holic
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
847
Location
Scotland
There was a lot of clay were I grew up, the bane of gardeners I heard.

My enterprising friend and I when we were 14y/o dug out a few large chunks of the blueish stuff from behind the sports field and used it to make moulds for lead fishing weights.
We'd 'borrow' some lead flashing from various roofs, melt it down over a gas burner and pour it into these baked clay moulds, and drop a swivel in.
A whole lot of filing later, we were selling them by the dozen.
I wonder if that's what lit the entrepreneurial fire for my friend, he now owns Europe's largest fishing retail space.
 




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