a kind of pine

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by Dimitree, Apr 7, 2020.

  1. Dimitree

    Dimitree TDPRI Member

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    hello
    I'm going to build a Fender style cabinet (for a Princeton), and of course I'm going to use pine, for the reasons we all know.
    But, since I'm in Italy, american pine is quite rare and pricey. Instead, european pine (laminated) is very common and cheap, so I think I'm going to use that one. But, I'm wondering if they are substantially the same tree. I'm not a botanist so I can't tell if they share the same properties, more than anything those we are insterested in..

    what do you think?

    also, I'd like to specify that the cab will be covered by tolex, so I don't care about aesthetic differences.
    thanks
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2020
  2. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Laminated? You mean plywood? or do you mean narrow strips of wood glued together?

    There is lightweight northern pine (used for cabs) in the US, and southern pine which is quite heavy. I had a cab built in the south and it was southern pine, man that was a heavy cab and not what I expected at all.
     
  3. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Friend of Leo's

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    I've got a Deluxe sized cab I started a while back with southern pine. 15 pounds without even a baffle in it!
     
  4. Dimitree

    Dimitree TDPRI Member

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    I mean strips (3" wide more or less) of wood glued together, not plywood
     
  5. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, that's not bad stuff around here. Lightweight?

    I built a bookcase out of it a few years ago... Beware, I was surprised after a year or so some of the longitudinal glue joints show a bit of separation, but they aren't really loose yet. Not many.
     
  6. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    ...for reasons we all know? I'd have to say those are mostly sentimental reasons. There's a number of arguments to be made for using a sonically dead material like medium density fiberboard (mdf) but I don't really have an interest in that argument.

    I built a cab using locally available pine; it was relatively cheap here. Most likely southern pine, it had a few knots. I did it for sentimental reasons, as I grew up in one of the western states of the US and pine was used for practically everything. It was what was available.

    I wouldn't worry too much about pine species. I understand there is some Carpathian pine available in Europe that is of some interest for acoustic properties, but I have no idea how expensive it is. Seems like what you are referring to as a laminated product would work fine, and you are covering it with telex, so who will know anyway.

    I don't think you could line up a bunch of speaker cabs in a blind test and have anyone normal person listen and say, hey, that's sounds like Douglas fir from northern Idaho...sure, the cabs may have some difference in sonic properties, but not definitively linked to any particular species of wood.

    Here's a few photos of my cab. I didn't go to Tolex covering, because that would have added expense and time. I'm not too worried about the finish getting bruised, even though I have been gigging 7 times a month or so...until you know what...

    IMG_0223.jpg

    IMG_0225.jpg

    plain old box end joints, with dowels, no fancy dove tails, as I was only a framing carpenter in ancient history, not a cabinet maker. That bottom piece on the back side is plain old plywood, from scraps I had. Good luck with your build!
     
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  7. Paul-T

    Paul-T Tele-Meister

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    In the UK we call it furniture board. I've had my TV sitting on a piece for at least 10 years and no sign of splitting.

    Getting 18 or 19mm pine that's 230+mm wide s getting tricky, normally it's thicker - my woodyard that would plane it down has just closed, so I'm planning on furniture board for my next cabinet, personally. I think covered in tolex it's likely oK. Schmee's post worries me but I suspect his is a cheaper or whitewood furnitiure board.

    In the UK it's listed as whitewood (spruce) and redwood (pine), the latter is the more stable and that's what I'd go for. (In the US the same words apply to different timbers!).To be clear that\s for furniture board - for solid timber, I'd go for either, if I could get the right thickness.

    In the US you have a much better choice but it's much trickier in Europe.

    This is the redwood (pine) board that looks pretty good. Other people here have worked with it too and found it ok.
    Rewoodfurnutreboard.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2020
  8. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    ...all apologies, just a double post, what with all the internet activity, you can't always tell that a post made it to the thread until later...
     
  9. Prophetsnake

    Prophetsnake Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    I'd suggest any European softwood. I use Deal, which is really Spruce of the same species they use for guitar tops, but the growth rate here in Ireland makes it unsuitable for anything but shelves - or cabinets. I'd say any coniferous wood you can get at the local building supply will work just as well as pine.
     
  10. ginomolinari

    ginomolinari Tele-Meister

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    Hi there fellow italian amp builder. After spending 17 years in the US and lately coming back to Italy I have to agree that choices are limited and pricier around here. I have built a cabinet with american pine which was cheap and easy to work. No wonder Leo Fender used it. I then used birch plywood which is though as nails but stiff and heavy. The glued “listellare” you can find in italian hardware stores is, for lack of better words, a piece of ****; frail and lightweight. The one option that I have not tried yet is spruce (abete) which is fairly priced but comes only in huge planks and a bit too thick. But I think that would be the way to go on a (possible) next project.
     
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  11. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    Gino,

    Poplar certainly is a good choice for a cabinet.

    If the milled lumber you have available there is greater than 19mm (3/4" for you fraction fanboiz), you can take it to a local cabinet shop and they'll run it through the planer for you for a really reasonable fee.

    19mm is a fairly standard thickness for a Fender-style combo amp cabinet.

    Cheers,

    Geno
     
  12. Dimitree

    Dimitree TDPRI Member

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    thank you guys
    I think I found some solid yellow american pine, looks good and the price is right, maybe is better than the cheap multipiece pine.
     
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