69-71' Yamaha Acoustic Red Label Owners Club _ Please Sign In ;-)

Discussion in 'Guitar Owners Clubs' started by Don Mare, Mar 2, 2009.

  1. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    The actual date is in a date code on the inside of the guitar. You would have to remove the strings and use a flashlight and your cell phone camera to find it. That's actually the most important part of what I'm looking for. Relating the sequential serial numbers to the date codes. It will probably be 45.??.??, with 45 being the year 1970, and the ? being the month and day.

    By what data I have your FG-180 was made mid 1970. The FG-140 would be late 1970.

    If you could find those date codes I'd really appreciate it.
     
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  2. ga20t

    ga20t TDPRI Member

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    @CTGull ,

    Here is what's inside the 180. Looks to be "45.7 –", the next digit possibly buried under kerf lining, and then a disconnected "6" in larger font (part # for matching/assembly as on the 150 below in white?):

    [​IMG]

    and the 150 appears to be "45.11.–7" on both sides, though the marking is not the greatest:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2017
  3. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    EXCELLENT!! This numbers fall perfectly inline with the data I already have.

    I really need to find guitars from 1971 & 72. I probably have 12 numbers but they're either a serial number or a date code, no pairs.
     
  4. ga20t

    ga20t TDPRI Member

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    I'm just now reading back on your posts in this thread. Sorry I missed that! Just saw a notification that the thread was active and posted away asking my question without having caught up. Good work.
     
  5. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    I made a website about vintage Yamaha FG's last weekend. It should be easier to find info without having to wade thru posts on my forum. Check it out and let me know what you think. http://yamahavintagefg.com/
     
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  6. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    I've changed my mind! I might as well get the dual serial numbers from the 1970 to 76 Taiwan made FG's.

    I've gotten some and figured out they had the "T" in front of the 7 digit serial number on the block until mid 1973, then they removed it. I believe those are sequential numbers and the upper 8 digit number is the actual date code.

    The only problem is the Red Label Taiwan models ONLY have the 7 digit with "T" number, there is no 8 digit serial number. I looked inside one last night and couldn't find any other markings.
     
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  7. Southernbear

    Southernbear NEW MEMBER!

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    OK, this is my first post. I have red label FG 180 but it does not say NIPPON GAKKI on the red label. Is this a Taiwan made guitar? I just pulled it out the other day, I am original owner. Bought it I think around 72 (?). When I go home tonight I will check for any numbering on it. The truss cover does not say reinforced. It has been at a friends house for 20 years. I let him use it when I bought my first Martin and to be honest, forgot about it. My friend passed, and the guitar was returned to me in pretty bad shape. It sat for a year or 2 and I decided to put it back in shape and stumbled on this forum. This is pretty cool stuff and information.
     
  8. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    Yes, your guitar would have been made in Taiwan, late 1971 to late 1972. I'm working on an article about the Taiwan FG's between 1972 to 1976.

    Find the serial numbers and post them here when you get a chance. There will be a 7 digit number on the neck block, possibly with a "T" in front of it. There may also be an 8 digit number on the brace under the fretboard.

    There's lots more info in my forum and website.
    http://yamahavintagefg.boards.net/
    http://yamahavintagefg.com/
     
  9. Hamster09

    Hamster09 NEW MEMBER!

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    I need help identifying my FG-75 that I bought back in the early 1970's. It has a red label, Nippon Gakki with the crossed tuning forks. It does NOT say anything at all about its country of origin. From what I have read the FG-75 should have identification numbers on both the brace and on the head block. Mine has only an 8 digit serial number(20112188) on the cross brace, so I assume that it was made in 1972. We had very little money back in those days, so I am sure that the guitar was probably under $75, probably closer to $50. Any idea what it may be worth today?
     
  10. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    You are correct. The Taiwan models have serial numbers in both places, Japan models do not. The 8 digit serial numbers are easy to decode. 1/12/1972, 188th guitar made that day. The FG-75 was a low end model with ladder bracing, not the X bracing seen on 99% of guitars. The model may have been copied from a classical guitar and just beefed up to withstand the higher tension of steel strings. The small body of the FG-75 sounds boxy, probably good as a blues guitar. I've seen lots of them, not selling for much. Maybe $100. The full size dreadnought models (FG-140, 160, 180, 200) are much more popular.

    See my forum and website for more info.
    http://yamahavintagefg.boards.net/
    http://yamahavintagefg.com/
     
  11. CK Dexter Haven

    CK Dexter Haven Friend of Leo's

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    Actually many(most/all) the 75s including my RL Taiwanese example are fan braced, same as a classical. Like most entry level Yamaha classicals of the era they are some what over built, thus the boxy tone. There is not much that can be done,medium strings will cause the bridge area to belly(many are already like this) and extra light or S&S will give the guitar a small voice. Mine plays well in first position, w/ lights, so I enjoy it for what it is, a inexpensive "vintage" piece that takes it's place along with my Silvertone, Harmony & other thrift store "strummers" from the "70s.. As for price $100 is the common ask, IMHO it's too much $40-50 is more reasonable. considering that you can get a new modern acoustic from Yamaha, Epiphone, etc. for $100 pretty much at the drop of a hat. It will sound better, have better tuners, and be more enjoyable to play. The old budget guitars are fun to collect, and play on occasion, but basically they are decorations at this point.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  12. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    Well said. That's kind of what I was thinking but I was being nice. I have a Taiwan red label and it's so overbuilt I could probably stand on it. I only paid $50 and it's in near mint condition. It's more or less a wall hanger. I much prefer the FG-110. They have some real sweat tone and resonance only seen in solid wood guitars.
     
  13. ga20t

    ga20t TDPRI Member

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    Yeah, I've never payed more than $225, and that was a MIJ Nippon Gakki red-label FG180. If I came across a budget model like the 75 and it was in particularly nice condition, and played and sounded nice, and didn't have any structural issues, I'd have no problem overpaying by quite a bit, but that would max out at $250 or so. But I might be an outlier because I'd like to find one to complete my little collection, but I'd be looking for a red-label (even if just because).

    Speaking of structural issues, anyone else's red-labels have intonation issues? Both my FG-150 and 180 intonate quite flat, enough that a 13 set won't correct it. Factory saddles as well. Hard to imaging time pulling the bridge the opposite direction of the force of the strings, so I assume they were shipped this way? Or perhaps the factory action was set so high that they built the sharpening of fretted notes into the equation in regards to the saddle placement? Or maybe I just found two duds in this regard, years apart and from two different cities.
     
  14. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    I just noticed this thread hasn't had any activity in 11 months!!! I learned a lot here in my early days of FG interest.

    MUST... NOT... LET... IT... DIE!!!!!!
     
  15. Jonzilla

    Jonzilla Tele-Meister

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    Strummin my '72 FG200 now. I've had it about 5 years and it looked new when I got it. I paid $150. It could use a neck reset, but is still great to play. Scrolling through this thread for the first time, hoping it was still alive!
     
  16. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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    I have a minty FG-200 also, paid $75. And it's in line for a neck reset. One of these years.
     
  17. andresound

    andresound TDPRI Member

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    08DAB73A-6270-414C-9B24-5F7CB8CADA3C.jpeg 2C945387-6EFE-4D09-9AF0-456DD3343B5B.jpeg Hi Guys, I am a proud owner of a FG300 red label made in Japan NIPPON Gakki. It is minus a pick gaurd. Received it a week ago. Sounds awesome, has its own “unique” voice, however neck angle is a bit steep (high action at 12). Spoken to a luthier who suggested sanding some meat of the last 5 frets. There seems to be enough room left to lower the action at the saddle, therefore, I might be able to get away without doing a neck reset. Apparently he has done quite a few with this problem. Your thoughts would be appreciated. The guitar is definitely playable as is! Wanting to use this as a “campfire” guitar.
    Checked for serial numbers, none.
    Any suggestions on a replacement pick guard? A3CC83AE-FA58-4FD2-8836-2D79BA3D6EFF.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  18. CTGull

    CTGull TDPRI Member

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  19. andresound

    andresound TDPRI Member

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    Thank you for the info. I had a plain black one made by my Luthier when he reset the neck. Guitar now plays great
     
  20. jaydin_wulfe

    jaydin_wulfe NEW MEMBER!

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    Hey all, I know this is the red label club, but I wasn't able to find a thread better related to what I have. So my grandfather gave me this guitar yesterday. It was made in Japan and is in near mint condition. It is a beautiful guitar and sounds great. I have found a lot of varying information on line but nothing definitive. Iam just looking for information about it. IMG_20181020_190556.jpeg IMG_20181021_140532.jpeg IMG_20181021_140502.jpeg IMG_20181021_140557.jpeg IMG_20181021_140602.jpeg IMG_20181021_140610.jpeg
     
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