4 new necks

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Sep 24, 2019.

  1. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    I've started building these 4 new necks from maple, walnut, mahogany, and yellow tarara and I have a few questions.

    After cutting roughly the mahogany and the yellow tarara necks, I found out that each has a slight bow - the mahogany one bows backwards and the tarara one has the normal bow as if under string tension. Should I discard these 2 necks, or is there a way to deal with the bow issues?

    I have done only maple necks so far that didn't require grain filling. Do I need to do grain filling for any of the other 3 necks (pretty sure I need to do it on the mahogany one)? What grain filler can I use for the necks that need grain filling? I have several Timbermate color variations, would that work as a grain filler?

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  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Nice!
     
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  3. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Holic

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    re: the bow- depending on how bad it is, I would run the neck over the joiner and get it flat before laminating the fingerboard. And when you do glue it up, clamp them both to a flat reference surface.

    re: filler- yes or no. If you want glossy smooth with no pore-out, you'll need filler on both the mahogany and walnut or else you'll be sanding off A LOT of finish and recoating many times. If you really want to accentuate the grain, go with black or very dark filler. If not, the closer the color of the filler is to the wood, the more the pores disappear. Some people don't mind open grain, it's probably more psychological than tactile.
     
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    I'd put a straightedge over the fretboard surface and determine how much has to be removed to flatten it. Then I'd add that amount to the fingerboard thickness. If it is more than 1/16", I'd probably level it and put a veneer in the middle under the fretboard.
     
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  5. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    I have had this issue of the neck blank being slightly bowed with figured maple. In my case it was less than 1/8th inch. I glued on the fretboard using several (as many as would fit) wood clamps as is. I use a 2 way truss rod. Had no problems at all getting it straight with the rod. The fretboard will add stability to neck as well. You really need to get a smooth finish or it will aggravate the player so you do need to fill the opened grained wood. If you do not want to change the color of the wood you can use a clear filler like StewMac’s ColorTone Clear Grain Filler. I have tried about every kind of wood filler…as I work with reclaimed wormy chestnut that is very opened grain due to age and condition I have moved to a UV cure (in sunlight) surf board building product.. Solarez Polyester UV Cure Grain Sealer. It is crystal clear cures in 3 minutes in sunlight. It takes 2 or three coats for me and takes about 10 minutes of sanding between coats.

    Wade
     
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  6. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    My two cents. I would plane the fretboard surfaces completely flat and put the necks away for a while - maybe 6 months or so - in the same humidity that the guitar will live at (45%?). If it is still dead flat after that time I wouldn't hesitate to build with it.

    As far as pore filling, I'm only familiar with mahogany (which I use for all my necks) and I do pore fill. If I don't care much about appearance or I'm in a hurry I use paste pore filler but my preference is a finishing resin called Zpoxy. I also only finish with lacquer so that may change your perspective.
     
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  7. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire

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    Do you have an idea of the moisture content of this wood? If you suspect its high, I would do as recommended above.
    I've had some luck vacuum bagging blanks to an aluminum rail I happen to have under mild heat for that last 10% before. Still took two days. That was with a piece of mahogany.
     
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  8. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    I'll try filling the pores of the mahogany and the walnut necks with one of the dark Timbermate colors I have.

    The yellow tarara bow is minimal and I'm fairly confident I can adjust it wit the truss rod. The mahogany one is not stiff at all and even though it has a back bow the truss rod adjustment might do the trick there as well.

    The mahogany bow is 2mm tops, and the tarara one is about 1mm, so way less than 1/8 of an inch.

    Zpoxy seems quite expensive, where do you buy it from?

    I bought all these as kiln dried 6-8 % moisture, but I will measure it and will let you know.
     
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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  10. 4pickupguy

    4pickupguy Poster Extraordinaire

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    You just want them stable. Its the differential that makes things move. 6-8% is way too dry to worry about. Thickness sander will straighten them out too, and you wont get any tearout. Acclimate them to local and build!
     
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  11. Luthi3rz

    Luthi3rz Tele-Meister

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    You're over thinking it. Install Truss rods and glue fret boards on. Use Hot Hide Glue.

    I'm not a professional or expert but I can tell you it's easy to over think things and get NOTHING done.
    To try and fix sht that don't need fixing.
     
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  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Internal tension is what makes wood move if the wood is dry. Sometimes it's due to the drying conditions, sometimes its due to the growing conditions. Some timbers are more stable than others.

    I'd never make a neck with wood that I had to clamp the daylights out of to try and force it to straighten before I even carve it.

    Hoping your truss rod will correct your problem is the wrong way to begin a project that has some many other variables that can go wrong down the road.

    When you are making a neck, you want stable wood. Start with wood that is slightly oversize and that will give you some material to remove if it moves.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2019
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  13. wadeeinkauf

    wadeeinkauf Tele-Holic

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    newuser1,
    You are getting some mixed messages here. You have less than a 3/32nd bow. If you are a master builder discard the blank. As pointed out leveling the blank has the problem of getting the blank too thin resulting in the bridge not being able to get the strings high enough up which would force you to put in a spacer in the neck pocket. I get the impression you are experimenting with different neck woods to see how you like them. Keep in mind that you will be radiusing the fretboard. Most fret boards and blanks purchased are ¼ inch or 8/32nd. So you have some wiggle room here the fix a bit of the bow. If you do nothing to the blank but glue on the fretboard, get it as close to level with the truss rod and you will automatically level the neck when radiusing. So it is up to you. That’s why we love this hobby. If you are making a Stradivarius-Caster then throw that blank away. If you are still building skills and experimenting then I’m with Luthi3rz on this one….Don’t over think it… Let us know how it turns out.

    I will add that I have completed my experimenting with neck woods. On my guitars I build one piece necks that are Hard Maple quartered sawn Honey Roasted (torrefied) at $48.00 a piece from American Specialty Hardwoods (these are dead flat).



    Wade
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2019
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  14. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Building guitars is just a hobby for me, and I'm experimenting with different neck woods right now. I am probably overthinking this, because even if the truss rods don't fix the problems, there's no customer waiting for a guitar to be completed, and I still have the valuable experience working on the necks.
     
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  15. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

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  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Actually thinking through what needs to be done is a critical part of this business. You end up with fewer bad parts and fewer trips to the urgent care center. Keep thinking.
     
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  17. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

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    I wouldn't say less than 3/32 is a big problem. In fact I see that more often than not after cutting out the neck back contour. I prolly remove more wood than one would for a strat type neck. Some degree of bow is pretty common I think.
    I have not seen more than 1/8th" ever. Usually 1/16th give or take.

    For a modest back bow, you can offset it very effectively by pulling the neck down while gluing on the fretboard. Stewmac has a guide on this somewhere. It works. You can get the neck true. Then when you radius the FB you can get it perfect.

    definitely grain fill mahogany. timbermate works well. thick CA also works really well for me.

    steve
     
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  18. tigger

    tigger Tele-Meister

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    For pore filling mahogany I would mix pumice with boiled linseed oil and aniline dye...
     
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  19. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Aqua coat is another good filler. The Mahogany and the Walnut will definitely need it.

    I agree with the others, plane them flat again and like freeman said store them for a few weeks and see if they move.
     
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  20. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Some fret board choices - cherry, walnut, granadillo, and maple. What do you think?

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