3 minutes 12 seconds

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Buckocaster51, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    After 3 minutes and 12 seconds, juke boxes would eject a record.

    Making that the Magic Number for the length of a “single”

    At least that’s what Colin Escott says in his biography of Hank Williams “I Saw the Light”
     
  2. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    When I was a little boy, and my momma worked as a cook at local café where we lived, I would go by, and the owner would let her fix me a hamburger without docking her eating privileges. I used to sit right by the juke box and watch the records going on and off the spindle, the arm going up, going down. The whole thing was lit up with an earie blue light that made it fascinating to a young boy fresh from an Alabama share cropper's farm. Oh that we could retain the innocence of youth.
     
  3. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Interesting, is that a fact or an anecdote?
    I had presumed that the tonearm triggered the change once it moved far enough in.
    Maybe a mechanism would have hurt tracking too much so they went with a timer?
    I've really only seen a couple of working 45 jukeboxes, so missed TD's experience of watching them closely.
    I do recall fascination with the mechanics though, always loved all things mechanical, took everything apart as a kid including my wrist watch!
     
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  4. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    My hometown BANNED jukes and pinball machines around 1956.

    All of them were disposed of.

    I remember a flatbed truck backing into our driveway with maybe dozens of them. One was off-loaded into our garage.

    It eventually worked its way into our basement. Where we kids became the envy of EVERYBODY for having our own Wurlitzer.

    78 rpm. I think it held 24 records. By the time we had left the house those discs had no grooves
     
  5. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Many a watch fell to my sword as a kid. I don't know what the fascination was, but I just HAD to see what was inside. I don't recall every getting one to go again after I worked on it.
     
  6. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    I have no idea. I just read it in the book. :) It seems reasonable that there may have been a timer of some sort to reject skipping records after a set period.

    Our Wurlitzer had a reject button on the back.
     
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  7. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    I cleaned and lubed my friends old jukebox. The newest 45s in it were from the fifties. The tone of the jukebox was a perfect match for the recording quality of the records. The best thing about it was knowing that you were hearing a band playing all together live, with the singer trying to incite the musicians to a hot beat right now.
     
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  8. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I remember "borrowing" quarters for the jukebox when we'd all go out for pizza at Bill's Pizza in Stevens Point WI. I was around 9 or 10 and my mom would instruct me that it wasn't borrowing, and I should rather just ask if I could have a quarter. I'd generally play Elvis. I remember some tunes that got a lot of play on that box (by teenagers hanging out) were "Sugar Shack", "Seasons in the Sun","Daddy, Don't You Walk So Fast", "Spirit In the Sky", "Poor Side of Town", "Run, Johnny, Run", "Cold as Ice", and yes "Jukebox Hero"
     
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  9. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is the old storefront of Bill's Pizza.
    [​IMG]

    They had a tiled mosaic of an italian chef holding a pizza, just inside the door, in a tiny entryway. They've since changed locations, and the two brothers who started the shop back in the 50s sold the business. It's not the same . But that pizza, in that pizzaria, that was magical
     
  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    WOW!
    Banned and confiscated?
    I do believe that, things were a little crazy then, maybe kinda like now.

    I recall in maybe '66 the high school up the road expelled half the graduating class boys at the start of the school year for hair long enough to touch the collar of a button down shirt. None of these kids had hippy length hair, maybe Beatles '65 length.
    Pretty sure they all got haircuts and were allowed back.
    I was a little ahead of them with the long hair and took a lot of crap for it in school, where boys under parental rule got crew cuts monthly. Of 150 kids I was the only longhair hippy fairy etc etc.

    I didn't know there were 78rpm jukeboxes, were those discs smaller than normal 78's?

    I do remember the big scratch as the needle hit the disc, before the music popped out!
    Can't remember where though, I was in a dry town, and despite beach tourism, there wasn't the social scene at food places, so no local jukeboxes I can recall. Again though, talking '60s not '50s.
     
  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    What was the tech of those machines?
    By the time those tunes were out all I recall was the little ones in booths at diners with the flip through mechanical menu.
    Funny, maybe Maine just didn't have the same social centers for single big 45 players.
     
  12. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Not sure they were “confiscated”...sold off as surplus is more like it. This was a 78rpm machine in the 50s. Not much future

    Full-sized 78s

    It was a mechanical wonder
     
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  13. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    It was very similar to one of these jobs

    [​IMG]
    Very groovy, yes?
    Seems like you could get 3 plays for a quarter
     
  14. Random1643

    Random1643 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Looking at the thread title, Buck, I thought we were going to learn more about your married life than is strictly necessary. ;)

    I grew up on those machines. Remember sitting at the Marlane Diner every Friday night when my Dad would take us out - and my Mom didn't cook. There was a little jukebox station at the far end of every booth. We could select songs from the station and they would miraculously play on the jukebox on the far wall of the room. That's new info for me regarding the length of songs & jukebox record length.

    One of the cooler moments of my admittedly not-very-exciting-life was when an old school German bar in Two Rivers, Wisconsin put a few songs by me and my buddy - a fingerpicking/harmony vocal duo - on their jukebox. (Plus, best corned beef in the northeast part of the state IMHO.)
     
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  15. teletimetx

    teletimetx Doctor of Teleocity

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    In what was a much smaller town at that time, King's Food Host was the restaurant with the juke box in Boulder. Became a High school hangout place, mostly for kids older than I was; about 1968.

    Each booth had a little jukebox selector station. J7, H5, B3; that kind of thing. Found a photo:

    dinerbox-wallboxes.png

    The more obnoxious version was to set up a repeat play of some lame song, then leave.

    Dang. Smells like nostalgia.
     
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  16. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    And the good people of the Tonawandas (Niagara and adjacent Erie County) were not amused. Wurlitzer was based there (my Dad was an organ tuner there for a while before he enlisted in the Army Air Corps).

    If I remember right, the timing mechanism was for when the record got damaged and the song was not playing to completion. I could be wrong about that.
     
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  17. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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  18. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Elijah Wald , the same author who wrote “how the Beatles destroyed rock ‘n’ roll”, also wrote a book called “escaping the Delta” about Robert Johnson and the invention of the blues.

    They go into great detail in that book about juke boxes and rack jobbers and people that supplied music to other people in the 30s.

    And how the record charts were initially based on jukebox plays.

    The number one blues artist of the 30s? Blind Boy Fuller. As much as I love Mr. Fuller I’ll have to look into that one a bit more ...
     
  19. chezdeluxe

    chezdeluxe Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I was a kid I always played Duane Eddy’s “Peter Gunn” on the jukebox......For some reason it was the loudest song on the machine and I liked that.
     
  20. trapdoor2

    trapdoor2 Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    Working from my age-enhanced memory here...

    My 19-teens Victor machine uses the 78rpm 'runoff' track to trigger the "off" switch, causing the machine to stop. It is a windup machine and the trigger arm is adjustable for shorter or longer records. All mechanical. Works perfectly.

    IIRC, the Wurlitzer 78rpm 'bubble' jukebox that my high-school buddy had in his basement hangout had a similar trigger to tell the machine to stop and change the record. It was based on the wiggle from the 'runoff' groove on the record that swung the arm against a trigger switch, initiating the changeover system. I don't know if it had a timer...but I doubt it.

    AFAIK, all 45rpm records had a similar runoff groove. In the old 50's player I had as a kid, this tied to the tonearm and triggered a mechanism to drop another record off the spindle. No timer, simple mechanics.

    Edison probably set the standard. His early cylinders were 2min but after about 1905, he introduced the 4min cylinder as his standard. The flat disc was invented by Emile Berliner in the 1880s but his early discs generally followed Edison's lead (they were only 7" in dia). Victor took over from Berliner in producing flat discs and they were good for up to 5 min...but the average tended to be between 3 and 4 minutes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
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