2017 New road bicycle thread...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by robt57, May 24, 2017.

  1. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have not posted a bike pic this year yet.

    Retiring my 2008 Scott Addict LTD, cobbled this Domane together.
    I also got a Madone late last year I never posted. But this Series 6 Domane is a real pimp cushy long ride sled.

    Ultegra Di2 Electronic Group, some home spun [laced] wheels...

    [​IMG]

    I got this Domane frameset and some parts off eBay. New price for a Series 6 would cause my wife to kill me if I even suggested I wanted a $6-7k bike.

    ________________
    I will stick last years Trek here. I got this Madone Series 4 Kamtail Aero frame new with full warranty late last season and built it up. Sick clearance sale 550.00 in the box from the Trek dealer. It is a little too race for me it turns out, well for 6 hour rides anyway. For a 2-3 hour fast fests I like it fine though. ;)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017
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  2. Silent Otto

    Silent Otto Tele-Meister

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    nice sled :cool:
     
  3. dogwatermike

    dogwatermike Tele-Meister

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    Nice! I bought a Madone 10 years ago ....nice! Before that it was the steel frame Italian bikes..... I had moved to Albuquerque, near the foot of the Sandia mountain....hills galore! The steel frame was really bendy...the composite frame really helped stiffness...

    How do you like the electric shifting? The reviews say the shifting is faster and more positive than the manual.... what do you think?
     
  4. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have Di2 on the Scott as well. It is coming off to sell and going on the Red Trek.

    To answer your question, I got the programming module for my PC. You can program the system to shift faster if you hold a button, you can swap any of the buttons to do different things.

    The front is auto trimming which is cool. The front shifts like magic even at lower cadence.

    I used some previous version parts to save money. But if you go internal battery and newest junctions the double front cranks can auto shift. I would have needed 300.00 more in parts, so I skipped that. It is called di2 synchro shift, google it. It is cool stuff.

    BTW, I still have a few steel bikes with cables, even bar end shifters etc I will never get ride of...
     
  5. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    BTW, I was never really a Trek guy. But since they calmed down paint via the Project One path [both these Project One] and they look a bit more plane, I like them.

    I also think Trek has good implementation on a few aspects of these pressed Bottom Brackets and internal cables. I had a new 2014 Specialized that I got rid on in 6 months after fighting with these two aspects of a Roubaix. And I am an experienced wrench.

    My 2008 Scott Addict is the Last threaded bottom Bracket Addict. I almost hate to let it go for that reason. ;)
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2017
  6. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Got a Giant Toughroad late last year, so I guess that doesn't qualify. I took the flat bars off initially & put drop bars with my SRAM shifters turning it into a off road road bike, until I broke the shifter paddle off. 5-8 hr rides in the back country are the norm now. It's kind of insane being vulnerable back there. I'm walking around with Yucca spines embedded in the meaty part of my shin in March. I couldn't get them out!

    Very nice rides. I have plenty of my race bikes still. Did my first road ride on Sunday since I got the Toughroad. I had forgotten how mellow a road bike can be after being tossed around all day off road.
     
  7. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I had a custom disk steel CX/gravel/winter frame made 2015. It fits a 2.1 650b or a 45x700 pretty easy. I have not touched my 29er or old steel Stumpjumper since. ;) Swiss Army bikes are a gas no doubt.

    ChunkyMonkey650B mode_sm.jpg

    CX-Paves_m55.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2017
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  8. w3stie

    w3stie Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nice bike! I had a Madone 5 but sold it due to lack of use. These bikes don't hold their value well, but sounds like you got a deal. I would have thought disc brakes but they still have rims?
     
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  9. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nice. I sort of keep on with Treks and smile because I often see next year's stuff painted white or even raw AL early prototypes because some of their engineers, product and brand staff are in my off road riding posse and ski club.

    I'm not too into road bikes these days. It's something I'll probably do again when too old or slow to ride dirt. For now I do an occasional ride on a now old Chris Chance (Fat Chance fame) custom steel bike with Campy vintage that's all pretty polished metal.

    My views are modern stuff that's plastic or recycled beer cans doesn't hold value like the past or a few special items made of steel or titanium.

    I used to treat my special steel bikes with pretty paint with care - I guess all bikes. Now I treat bikes as disposables and like a horny teenager dating a bikini model.

    My wife has gotten SO back into MTB riding that another bike like her Remedy might be in the future. She's way more cautious with steeps, rocks and logs but can make me hurt or work in other places. Similar bikes would be fun.

    I love gear as man here do but last year my big lesson was working on the bike engine vs bike.

    Ride on!
     
  10. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    Just flared up a 'rrhoid doing a 42 mile road ride. 'Rrhoid ride, more like. I'm getting too old for this stuff, I guess.
     
  11. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I have a Domane 5 series I put together last year.. good bike. I've rode tons over the years, I used to race a fair bit. Mine is all mechanical.. not that eager to get into the electronic shifting, although I'd appreciate the lower effort to shift the front derailleur.

    I struggle now with my left wrist.. and learning guitar makes me very wary of overdoing it, I'm very paranoid about my bike fit. Since it's the left wrist that is the only thing that makes me think about Ui2/Di2 electronic shifting. I have been trying this year to do lots of exercises to try and strengthen my forearms to deal with it. For me bicycling has always messed up the extensors in my forearms.

    I rode about 4000 miles last year, mostly cause I had signed up for a 135 mile/8000ft ride and needed to get ready for it. I don't have any goal this year and it's been pretty bad weather wise so I'm pretty far off that pace.

    I've got a couple other bikes too, I have an All City Space Horse (Steel Gravel/Touring type bike) and a really old giant NRS MTB that I still use once a week or so. Not that mountain biking is terribly better for wrists/forearms!
     
  12. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Another problem mostly solved or at least for me with modern gear MTB riding. My usual 1.5 - 3 hour trail rides never cause that problem like a road ride with less time can.

    FWIW, the WTB brand Pure V saddle has been a super problem solver and I find it really interesting that my same height wife with wider hips is equally happy with it.

    We also hate to admit that expensive shorts or liners make a difference. I wear liners under other shorts more and more. Even at 5'10 and never more than 150 pounds it seems like no tight shorts is an important public service.
     
  13. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Interesting on left wrist because that can be a problem here. I've tried exact same handlebar model made from fancy plastic vs recycled beer cans on same bike and same routes. I did not find fancy plastic to be the magic many claim it is. We also have a same series Trek frame with one made of the fancy plastic and other recycled beer cans. It has me convinced it is another case of diminishing returns as you spend.

    Sorry for your old Giant NRS but our 2016 Remedy 29 (Trek) allows hours of hammering, rock gardens, and low level flight with less wrist and hand pain than I get with much shorter times on rigid bikes whether pavement or not. I've started using a 29r hard tail for errands and commuting flipping the fork between plush and rigid and that's doing more than rest and NSAID doses.

    Try different handlebar width. I have not tried wider road bars but for off road friends don't let friends ride stupid old long stems and narrow bars.

    Get rid of your front derailleur. You'll rest that wrist, you'll save weight, they're ugly. If a lame old fart like me doesn't need a front derailleur most all the rest of the world doesn't need one. For general MTB riding front derailleurs are the dude still with a mullet or a welfare program for someone who works for Shimano.

    If you get a new MTB you'll probably appreciate not having heirloom wheels.
     
  14. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Agree on loosing the front DR, XT has a 1x11 that does not kill the 401k like the xtr does. SRAM does 1x11 too I think.

    But I think the XT Di2 2x11 does the synro auto front shift optionally. Google it.

    I had a bad right side tendonitus thing I could not shake. The Di2 with no arm twist lever swing helped allow it to finally heal. It took 6 months. A trillion hammer swings I guess ate up my right elbow. I wish the air nailer setups got invented a lot sooner....
     
  15. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Also add that I've been using way top end shorts and bibs for forever. As important to riding as the right neck on a guitar us as far as I am concerned.

    Before going Domane with the designed seatpost design, I have converted a few bike to 25.4 carbon seat posts with shims for more flex. The right carbon seatpost can make a great difference. I have a P6 Hi flex on the Madone since that picture. The green Strong Custom has A Cannondale 25.4 with a shim.

    The handlebars I put on the Domane are control tech TUX. I chose them because they scored worst in a carbon bar shootout test as the most flexy. When you like to do 1/2 and all day jaunts, all that stiff race sheit is for pro racers, not me. The Domane is treks best seller for a reason.
     
  16. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Not tried the V, but I bought 5 WTB SST Ti saddles 15 years ago they where so good. Used on road and trail bikes. Finally wore thru them all...
     
  17. ozcal

    ozcal Tele-Holic

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    big fan of front derailleurs out here... some pretty big hills around tahoe and the foothills... sure you can get the climbing gears with a 28 chainring and 46 or 50 on a 1 x 11 or 1 x 12, but when it comes to fast pedal sections you just don t have it... all of my bikes with the exception of the custom bianchi SS run 2x set ups... 2x 8, 2x9, 2x10, 2x11..

    nice looking bike robt57... i ve become more of a fan of trek over the years... i m not so much into Di2... i ve seen pinched wires on batteries etc from heavy handed folks with seatposts... i like new der cables on a bike at least once per year... xtr is never worth the money imho, sram eagle is what 400 bucks for a cassette ?? madness... shimano xt is my fave...

    i ve had good luck with wtb saddles also but the brooks b17 on my salsa mukluk carbon is like a couch.. heavy sure, but unrivaled in the comfort stakes...

    got my eye on an evil insurgent with a push 11 6 shock... very nice but pretty spendy...

    anyway, i m out the door to ride the hoot trail, run a few laps... maybe connect up with the switchbacks.. still a month or so from riding downieville... bummer

    https://www.trailforks.com/trails/hoot-trail-88696/


    enjoy ya bikes fellas !!
     
  18. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    For road and fast group rides a 1x11 could never work for me.
    That Domane is set up with a 34/52 [Di2 makes that work seemlessly] and for group riding with youngins a 14-28 cassette. 8 one tooth jumps until I hit the climbing ratios. ;)

    One the other end of the spectrum, I have a cheater single speed. It has a Two Speed SRAM wheel I built that goes from 1/1 to 1/1.36 at about 13 MPH. So 55 and 78 gear inches. I hate my other SS wheels now as a result. My knees are 60 years old just like I am.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2017
  19. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I've mostly tried it all. I've done lots of fancy fit sessions over the years. The wrist thing is mostly about getting my fit very close to correct. It's been hard to figure out over the years as I have really long legs, it makes it somewhat tricky to get it right on stock road bikes. (Much easier on mountain bikes.) My seat height is so high it gets difficult to get the bars high enough without them being too far away.

    Getting rid of the front derailleur would probably work for me for the mountain bike, I don't need to shift all that often.

    It pretty much flat out is not really an option for fast/long road rides the terrain in New England where I live. That's most of the types of riding I do.

    The one thing I do need to do is get the SRAM derailleur off my gravel bike.. it takes significantly more force to operate than a Shimano one. I have shimano gear for that bike sitting on the shelf I just need to find a weekend afternoon to waste rebuilding the bike.

    It's all a money pit too unfortunately. My maintenance budget last year would easily have bought me an American Tele or Strat and a nicer amp. Or maybe a nice Martin acoustic or something too. That high maintenance budget is partly cause I tend to be unable to stop riding in the winter.
     
  20. robt57

    robt57 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    But pays off in spades in the fitness dept.
     
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