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1969 Thinline, th real deal! What should I do?

Discussion in 'Vintage Tele Discussion Forum (pre-1974)' started by teleman1, Dec 2, 2020.

  1. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    I have the original bridge and possibly, but I doubt it, the original neck without a cover. Both don't work! I am intending to get the bridge repaired a la Lindy Fralin. What do you suppose the value is of a repaired 69 bridge Pickup? Should I sell it or use it as the bridge? I was thinking of just getting Fralin stock in it or Antiquities and calling it a day. This is a players guitar, sounds incredible unplugged. If I use the bridge PU, then I need to match the neck to it,(and still need to authenticate the neck pickup). Thoughts and ideas?
     
  2. Piotr

    Piotr Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Hard to understand what you mean - so you have a '69 Thinline with problematic pickups?
     
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  3. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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    A non functioning pickup is worthless.

    A pickup repaired by someone with a reputation and high name recognition like Lindy Fralin would be worth only slightly less than a fully functional, unmolested example.

    It kind of depends on what level of "player" the guitar is. Have a handful of things been changed or is it painted bright orange and routed for a Floyd Rose?

    If it's mostly original, then it might definitely be worth it to have the pickups restored.
     
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  4. Antoon

    Antoon Tele-Afflicted

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    Not if it is a vintage pickup IMO, in that case a dead but original pickup is worth more than a rewound one. Rewinding a pickup by a pro is never more than $100. Usually cheaper.
     
  5. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    I am in the middle of discussing this with Lindy and waiting for a reply. SOmeone is asking $600 + for one. Lindy also tipped me that if there is a cloth lead on it, it is NOT original. Original has a hard plastic wire I would figure a rewind by Lindy might put a value of $200-$250 being a repair, but done buy Lindy.

    Here is a real one.https://reverb.com/item/36374265-19...zzcwN25hCbGYpIpmfyOV1VH-LrpAJr0BoCrIkQAvD_BwE
     
  6. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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  7. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Afflicted

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    I would think that when selling time came, "pickups rewound by Lindy Fralin" would carry quite a bit more weight than "pickups dead, but original".

    A pickup that doesn't work is a useless wad of magnets and wire that nobody wants. Getting it to function would involve opening it up, spoiling solder joints, etc....Either way the value is compromised, so in my mind it's kind of a wash.

    But then again...there are lots of things in the vintage guitar collecting world that don't make sense.
     
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  8. Antoon

    Antoon Tele-Afflicted

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    It does make sense to me. There is always a chance that a dead pickup can be repaired instead of rewound. A collector is probably not interested in a separate pickup but if he would he would probably want it to be original not necessarily functional.
    If I had to rewind a vintage pickup, I would want it to be done by someone I chose and according to my specs.
    All to often I have seen parts of the bobbin replaced or the original cotton wrap not being reused, or the magnets remagnetized, or wax potted too heavily, after a rewind. I do not mind spending a few hours carefully preparing the bobbin to be rewound and wax-potting it myself. A pro does not have time to do that. I am what you would call a cork sniffer.

    Regarding the pickups in this topic I would have them rewound. Will probably sound better after that.
     
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  9. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    Sent them off to Lindy.
     
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  10. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    Well, the neck pickup was probably Chinese. Won't be using it. The bridge is a real 1969. So he will rewind it. I am purchasing a stock Frailin neck PU for the neck position. And that will be that.
     
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  11. aadvark

    aadvark Tele-Meister

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    Funny you should say that, because that's exactly what I plan to do to my blackguard.



    :)
     
  12. aadvark

    aadvark Tele-Meister

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    ok, joking aside. You won't be disappointed with Lindy Fralin... they are excellent pups!
    Play the thing and enjoy it!
     
  13. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    Removing the original bridge & saddles,(in the ole plastic preserve bag). Bought a Fender replacement. This my friend is Gattonizing for me. My fingers and pick hit that sucker on top & bottom. THought about using a better bridge, bu Callaham & Vintique require additional screws. Fedner stock is fine. ANd I order new compensated saddles
     
  14. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    OK, My Thinline is done.. I am pretty sure the neck radius is 7 & 1/4. I need to check the nut size. I like high action. My guitar guy raised it high but that doesn't raise it much in the frets close to the nut. SO it is too low for me at the nut. SO guys, would a new nut with higher action solve this issue? I played it though my ri 57 champ. The bridge pickup Lindy di a great job on, it lower vintage tone that snarls. His stock neck PU seem to be a good complement. I hope I can get use to the radius.
     
  15. Sea Devil

    Sea Devil Friend of Leo's

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    A new nut could obviously raise the strings at the nut, but you can only go so far before the lower frets start to go sharp.
    If you can pull the existing nut, I recommend putting some paper of various thicknesses under it until it's where you like it. Then either leave it like that or take it to a tech for a new nut with the same measurements. That will save a lot of guesswork.
     
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  16. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Tele-Afflicted

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    If Fralin doing in-house rewinding/repair now?
     
  17. teleman1

    teleman1 Friend of Leo's

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    He has been doing it for years.
     
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