1959 ES-335TD proto build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by preeb, May 3, 2011.

  1. preeb

    preeb Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

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    Bingo!!!

    No wooden handles... They are locked between the pinky and index finger while the thumb is used as a guide.
     
  2. Bad Juju

    Bad Juju TDPRI Member

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    Damn! That was my next guess but the "hardened steel" part through me... the band saw blad being flexible, I didn't know how hardened it would be. But I guess you wouldn't want a non-hardened blade zipping by right in front of you going that fast. :)

    - Shaun
     
  3. '59_Standard

    '59_Standard Tele-Holic

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    The first pic on post #124, Ken - I tried to quote it but no pic was available.
     
  4. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    [​IMG]

    Yep, that is a flexible silicone blanket on top of two thin aluminum strips. In between the aluminum strips is the three veneers with glue applied. No heat is applied until the whole lay up is pressed into shape.
     
  5. '59_Standard

    '59_Standard Tele-Holic

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    How does the heat process work, Ken. Looking at that you could assume its wired directly to the mains. lol :)
     
  6. LC100

    LC100 Tele-Meister

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    Why the need for the aluminum? Guessing it helps with heat transfer and maybe allowing for some slip of the laminates while conforming?
     
  7. Bob J

    Bob J Tele-Meister

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    It is so cool to watch this happen! I was addicted to the '59 burst thread (and joined TDPRI as a result) but found it ~1/3 of the way through the build, so it is great to get in at the start of this one.

    I am also grateful that I get to see the process documented by not one, but two dedicated historian-luthiers! Thanks to you both, great job so far (especially being so good (patient) at answering our questions. I had no idea what that red thing was (silicone heat blanket) or how it worked, so I am glad someone asked. I feel honored to be on this journey with you All!
     
  8. drgonzo2

    drgonzo2 Tele-Meister

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    Some impressive work on those plates and sides Ken. Between your work on the body, and Gil's work on the neck/pups/etc, this has the potential to be a great "reference" thread for future guitarchaeologists*...


    ... G

    * guitarchaeology - the study of how guitars used to be made in the historic "golden era" of guitar building (circa 1950-1965).:D
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  9. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Yes, it is a plug and go system. I should be controling the temp somehow but I don't. It is seat of the pants lutherie.
     
  10. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    That is pretty much it. It also adds a layer of smoothness between the silicone blanket wires that can cause bumps in the veneer surface.
     
  11. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    It is my pleasure...glad you got in on the ground floor:D
     
  12. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    A lot of the old Gibson workers are still around and there are a lot of stories that go around here in Michigan. My veneers supplier talks about the custom shop guys sneaking into the veneer supply and skimming the good stuff from the big piles. Just as in violinmaking there are many ways to accomplish a procedure. And some of the old ways were kind of sloppy by today's standards.
     
  13. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    The first body I made was surprisingly heavy to me and I wanted to pass it by Preeb so I told him the weight. He suggested finding some lighter maple. The Gibson shop probably had mucho stacks of hardwoods at their disposal and probably just randomly used maple for center block material.

    So I obtained some local (michigan) soft maple in 6/4 (1.5 inch finished) stock and planed it down to where I wanted and cut some blocks. Sure enough it came out about a pound lighter than the hard maple.
     

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  14. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    I think that will put us in the ballpark for a 7.5 to 8 lb ES 335.

    As for sound I do have sonic tests on the two bodies, hardwood block versus softwood that I can post. But neither are a finished guitar yet and even then they won't be in the same room so I am not sure how useful the test was. I just like to keep data for reference.

    Some try to extrapolate info from Les Paul's and speculate that hard maple creates a certain bright tone while soft is more mellow. I don't claim to know.
     
  15. jonson

    jonson TDPRI Member

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    Been lurkin here for ages and this is first post so Hi Guys. Only really come on here to read Gil's threads and totaly enjoy so nice one Bro. Broken run down planer blades and ground down files always been my weapon of choice. I will ask Bharat next time we speak. Glad he's been in on this one as he's got an awful lot to share.

    Ooops didn't see the bandsaw bit, so had to edit this but makes sense not to waste.
     
  16. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Hah, we drew you out! :twisted::twisted: Please contribute if you have some knowledge. We're all in this together.
     
  17. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    So now that we have the parts, mostly, we need to glue them into a guitar. I use hot hide glue for the assembly.

    This is the platform for the rib garland assembly. I went old school because I am trying to follow a photo of 1959 that I saw in a book.
     

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    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  18. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    Deviating from old methods a bit I use this PVC piping to clamp the ribs to the blocks. It corresponds perfectly with the radius.
     

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  19. telemcCaster

    telemcCaster Tele-Holic

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    The Rest of the mold looks like this. The rim mold sits on the platform and is registered by two dowels. It has a cutaway from the pattern at the horns. This is similar to the photo I saw of the old Gibson factory.

    Gotta go, wife calling...
     

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  20. Nick JD

    Nick JD Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I'm absolutely loving this build, Ken, and your skills are exemplary.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
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