$150 Drill Press: The Porter-Cable at Lowes or the Ryobi at Home Depot

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by BelairPlayer, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. BelairPlayer

    BelairPlayer Tele-Afflicted

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    I expect they’re roughly about the same quality. Any strong argument for one over the other? Anything an order of magnitude better for a little more? Thanks.
     
  2. John Nicholas

    John Nicholas Friend of Leo's

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    I didn't care for either of those, I'm not sure they are big enough to drill the ferrule holes in a Telecaster.

    After some research I purchased a variable speed wen drill press on Amazon, the quality of this drill press is so much better than either at Lowes or Home Depot.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HQONFY6/?tag=tdpri-20

    I bought it in September of 2017 and am very happy with the purchase.

    Of course, you will get tons of suggestions for everything from Vintage floor standing drill presses, to everything under the sun....

    This seemed to be the best mixture of size, power, quality and cost....
     
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  3. brandonh

    brandonh Tele-Meister

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    I have the same one. Great tool. I use it all the time now that I have it. The only thing that bugged me is the table angle tilt bolt came loose, but that’s nothing a little loctite and a wrench couldn’t fix.
     
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  4. RottenTheCat

    RottenTheCat Tele-Holic

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    Harbor freight. King Keng Fu.

    Best bang for ta buck.

    On cheapies, make sure the table's square.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
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  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    When selecting a machine, I always consider the parts availability when something breaks down the road. Porter Cable probably has the best chance of getting having a replacement part somewhere since Porter Cable and Delta were the same company over the years. Buy a quality brand name. Powermatic, Jet, Delta, Grizzly, etc. Many here look for used ones. I would consider a Harbor Freight machine to be disposable unless it is under the warranty plan. I've had a few Ryobi things over the years and they were less than satisfactory.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
  6. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I bought a ryobi 10" about ten years ago back when they were blue. It has had regular use throughout that span. The quick variable speed adjustment has been great.

    I have replace the main bearing 1 time and had no problem getting parts, except the digital readout which they wanted way too much for. I am pretty sure I did the bearing running 8" buffing wheels on it and the side pressure from buffing. Overall satisfied for the price I paid.



    Eric
     
  7. joealso

    joealso Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    I got a Harbor Freight special at Habitat for Humanity Restore for just under dirt nothing. Works great for anything I need.
     
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  8. POS Guitars

    POS Guitars Tele-Meister

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    The biggest problem is drilling holes anywhere in the body out of reach of the chuck, especially string through holes. A used old Deltas are decent, and large enough.
     
  9. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

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    I came within spitting distance of getting a nice old 18" Delta that would have been perfect for everything. Went to go get my money from the bank, and the shop selling me up called me and said the owner decided he wanted to keep it.

    Having had a tabletop Grizzly for years, I wanted something BIG, so I got the 20" HF. I was hung up on the idea of getting an old Delta, but a year and a half later still nothing suitable on CL, so I moved on. It's a monster, and a fine hunk of metal. It has a bit of table sag, but nothing a little shim stock won't fix. I was prepared to upgrade the bearings right out of the box, but it turns out there's no need.
     
  10. archtop_fjk

    archtop_fjk Tele-Holic

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    I use a cast iron drill press from the 1950s (Montgomery Wards brand!). :)

    For all my tools, one of the most important things I need are fixtures and jigs for holding the parts! Most of my jigs are homemade.
     
  11. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Folks once called it "monkey wards" and ridiculed their products. now we still use them and pine for the days when real stuff was made.
     
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  12. Bruxist

    Bruxist Friend of Leo's

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    Same here. Love it.

    The laser is kinda whatever but the light is awesome.
     
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  13. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Buy a drill press that has the capacities you actually need to do the work you intend to do with it. The small bench top units are handy for certain tasks but the lack of throat depth seriously compromises their ability to bore into the middle of larger objects as has been noted. Drill presses are relatively simple machines so you can usually accomplish the task with something "value priced", such as from Harbor Freight. You may or may not need to do a little tune-up to deal with any objectionable run-out, but otherwise, they drill holes nicely with more than enough precision for working in wood.
     
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  14. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I generally suggest getting the best you can afford at the time, when you buy a tool. However, I also agree with Jim_in_PA in that a drill press is a pretty simple tool and even the brands on the lower end of the spectrum can be pretty good.

    When I bought my drill press about 25 years ago i got a new 14" Trademaster brand for 179 bucks. It has done a lot of work for me with no problems at all. A while ago I picked up a couple machines for my shop at the cottage and when I saw a used Trademaster for sale cheap I grabbed it without hesitation.
     
  15. LeftFinger

    LeftFinger Friend of Leo's

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    I had a 14" King Canada that I took in partial trade on a rifle , what a POS

    I went looking for a good one in Saskatoon and ended up with a 17" King Industrial What a difference!!
    Quality tells

    I bought a used 8" Canwood at a garage sale for $20 , what a great little press I put it in the reloading room/shop/office/den it's quite handy
     
  16. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Important to remember that "name brand" tools bought at Lowe's or Home Depot are typically special runs for those stores, and can only be serviced where you buy it. My understanding is that some internal parts are plastic instead of metal in the store-brand models, lessening reliability.
     
  17. mfguitar

    mfguitar Tele-Holic

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    Even with an 8" press you can drill string ferrules (for a Tele anyway). I think in that price range you are going to find they are all similar in quality and design. I think the Porter Cable press is not really a PC product but a licensed product, true for their stationary tools. A similar model from Skil is only $114, if you can't go up in quality I would consider that one.
     
  18. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    An 8 inch drill press would have a 4" swing. That's the distance from the center of the bit/chuck to the post.

    A tele body needs more than 5"-6" to reach the ferrule holes, so a 10" drill press would even be questionable. Maybe you could drill the E string ferrule holes depending on the table casting. The part that goes around the column is sometimes raised up above the table surface. (The web?) The OP's examples are both 10" DP's.

    You can't go wrong with a 14" 0r 15" one. That's one machine tool I've never had to replace.


    tdowns.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
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