10 inch band saw

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Dpalms, Nov 10, 2020.

  1. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    5,056
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Location:
    Queensland Australia

    My bandsaw is a 14" with a riser block and sometimes I wish it was a little bit larger, and I have it on a wooden base with four large castors so I can shift it around the shed easily. Sadly the castors don't always stay locked and sometimes the whole shebang moves a little, but so far no harm done. I have a small toy bandsaw which gets used about three times a year for cutting an aluminium part, but that's about all it does......(and not very well either!)

    I would not consider a main workshop bandsaw smaller than 14"

    DC
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2020
    guitarbuilder likes this.
  2. Jim_in_PA

    Jim_in_PA Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    2,594
    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Location:
    SE PA - Doylestown PA
    A 14" saw takes up barely more space than a 12" saw and with a mobile base, it's easily tucked away if your garage is actually being used as a garage rather than a shop. :) Figure about two foot square "in general". 10" band saws tend to be benchtop units in many cases.
     
  3. tewiq

    tewiq Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    247
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Location:
    Granby Qc. Canada
    This is what i did : second hand 14", rebuild as needed, you wont regret it.
     
  4. Dpalms

    Dpalms Tele-Meister

    Age:
    41
    Posts:
    107
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2019
    Location:
    Montreal
    I found a 14 inch ridgid band saw for 150, but don't know how good they are, does anyone have any Experiance with these?
     
  5. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    5,056
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Location:
    Queensland Australia
    A 14'' of any brand would be way ahead of anything smaller..............but adjust it's performance with a "Tune-Up'" as per the Alex Snodgrass video.

    DC
     
  6. Dpalms

    Dpalms Tele-Meister

    Age:
    41
    Posts:
    107
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2019
    Location:
    Montreal
    Looked at some reviews after my post about the ridgid saw and it has some pretty bad reviews, I think I'll probably hold out until something better comes along
     
  7. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    24,217
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario County
  8. mrz80

    mrz80 Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    56
    Posts:
    374
    Joined:
    May 1, 2007
    Location:
    Gainesville,FL
    Same here. $40 for a pretty much non-functional saw. The sale was right down the street, so I just strapped it to my handtruck and wheeled it up the driveway; no having to borrow a truck. :) I tore it completely apart, replaced the bent lower wheel, installed new tires and guide blocks, scrubbed off the rust and repainted it, and iIt's been running fine for several years, though it bogs down on thick hardwoods. I recently scored a 1-1/2hp motor and new belt pulleys for it -kinda overkill for a 12", but I'd rather have too much power than too little!

    Ideally, I'd like to have a 16" saw for resawing lumber, and dedicate the 12" to a skinny blade for cutting bodies out, but that's another project for another time.

    I'd say a 12" is probably the minimum useful size for cutting out body blanks.
     
  9. Mr. Neutron

    Mr. Neutron Tele-Meister

    Age:
    65
    Posts:
    412
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2017
    Location:
    Near Boring, OR
    I can tell you a bench sized saw to NOT buy....... :( :oops:
    I recently overpaid for a used Ryobi 9" Bandsaw that I wish I hadn't bought. It's underpowered, and the table's adjustment setup is kinda marginal. The guide setup is marginal as well. I did get 4 extra blades with it; 3 for wood (2 extra "smallish" ones for tighter curves, 1 thicker one for straighter cuts), and a metal cutting blade. So I guess I'm set for extra blades, and if I don't want to make tighter cuts in thicker hardwoods.

    It will cut some nice tight stuff in 3/4" plywood, so that's its only saving grace.
     
  10. eallen

    eallen Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,390
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Location:
    Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
    Not going to say anything not already said but it largely depends on your plans. A good well setup 10-12" will work if all you are doing is cutting periphery.

    If you are resawing to book match tops a 14" minimum is essential. Unfortunately a strat/tele top requires a minimum 6.5" resaw capability. The only 14" that I know of that will resaw more than 6" are those with riser blocks and the Rikon Craftsman/,Rikon which will do 8".

    I run a 3/4" blade on my Craftsman/Rikon 14 and resaw anything without issue.


    While I will take a woodwork blog or magazine rating on a saw I seldom go by individual ratings like on amazon. Almost al saws I have seen people use work horribly simply because they have never been setup properly.
     
  11. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    73
    Posts:
    5,056
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Location:
    Queensland Australia
    I totally concur! My 14" Carbatec saw was bought new in 1999 and a 6" riser block added almost immediately. I used it for a few years with good results but when I came across Alex Snodgrass's set-up tutorial and set accordingly, it became a whole level of usefullness better and so accurate, I make all my own custom kerfing with it using a small guide unit I designed and dubbed the "Kerfinator"

    Mainly I use 3/4" to one inch blades for just about everything with good results and accuracy.

    As said here before I would not consider a saw less than 14" for what we do!

    Happy New Year All!

    DC
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.