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Wounded Seagull

Discussion in 'Acoustic Heaven' started by murdude, Jul 9, 2018.

  1. studio1087

    studio1087 Telefied Ad Free Member

    May 10, 2003
    Near Milwaukee
    This might make you feel better.

    I bought a new Big Baby Taylor to use as a “bigger” travel guitar recently. You have to use a 3/8” socket screwdriver to adjust the tension on the truss nut us by the headstock. Like this.....

    [​IMG]

    I rotated the nut. Perfected the neck. I set the screwdriver down and noticed that as I rotated the screwdriver the tip of the handle was digging into the headstock just enough to make a line in the wood perfectly parallel to the nut. The line is about 1/2” long. It’s a perfectly straight slight indent.

    I’ve been there man. Stinks. I just had to look at the line and say “screw it.....not worth the anguish....let it go”.

    You’re not alone.

    Life happens when you’re busy making other plans.....John Lennon. :cool:
     
    murdude likes this.

  2. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

    Feb 15, 2004
    You can drop fill the ding with superglue.

    If it needs leveling you can scrape the repair with a razor blade to
    level it.
     

  3. DavidP

    DavidP Friend of Leo's

    Mar 16, 2003
    Vancouver, BC
    ...not sure of the specific species of cedar they use (assume something from eastern Canada vs. west), but thuja sp. cedar is definitely softer than spruce.
     

  4. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    I think I am leaning toward just leaving it. At least for now. The picture makes it look worse than it is. Often times when looking at the full face of the guitar it's not even visible. Other times I see it in a different angle and lighting, and it makes me crazy LOL. Still...thanks for the suggestion. That might be the easiest fix.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
    Tommy Biggs and Stubee like this.

  5. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    I was wincing as I read your account of what happened to you. I hate to say that your misery helped me deal with my own, but it kind of did. Such things happen so rapidly and seem to come out of nowhere. Thanks for telling me about it.
     

  6. 6stringcowboy

    6stringcowboy Tele-Afflicted

    As others have noted, cedar is soft. I am on my second S6+ and it looks much worse than yours. Doesn't affect the sound though. It's a loud obnoxious little acoustic, wouldn't trade it for anything.
     
    murdude likes this.

  7. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    Would clear nail polish instead of superglue be of any benefit?
     

  8. jondanger

    jondanger Friend of Leo's

    Jan 27, 2011
    Charm City, MD
    I wouldn’t do this. It’s not going to flow right. I wouldn’t do the superglue either, because scraping it level is likely to damage the thin satin finish that is on most of the seagulls.
     
    Tommy Biggs and murdude like this.

  9. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

    Feb 15, 2004

    Maybe if you thinned it with thinner or acetone.

    The best repair would be superglue, and try to keep it level.

    Otherwise you have to scrape it, and tape off the blade only allowing a section the width of the repair to remain.

    Otherwise the blade can scratch the top.

    Another option is matching wood dust and superglue.

    Add as drop of glue to the area, followed by some wood dust. Repeat until level.
     
    murdude likes this.

  10. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    When looking at it from a different perspective, it really isn't very significant. The possibility of doing more damage and making it more noticeable, probably isn't worth the risk of trying to improve it. Best I just suck it up and accept that my perfect guitar isn't perfect anymore. The best thing that could happen is for me to have another faux pas and let this one go.
    Again, thanks for all the suggestions and understanding from all you people. I'm feeling rather silly to be worried about it.

    [​IMG]
     

  11. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

    If it is just a dent then steaming it should work. If the fibres are cut then steaming won’t work. If you don’t want to try steaming just use some furniture wax polish to fill the hole and leave it st that. The wax will act as a sealant and also disguise the mark pretty well.
     

  12. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2015
    Idaho
    I've removed far, far worse from a Seagull with steaming. Picked up one for a song from Craigslist with a thoroughly beaten up top, steamed out easily 90% of the dings and dents, and gifted it to a friend. I wish I still had pics, but they vanished two phone upgrades ago.

    Actually, they might still be on Facebook. I'll go search.
     

  13. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2015
    Idaho
    Found them! I didn't get photos from a particularly good angle, but there were dozens of pick marks on both sides of the soundhole in addition to the obvious dents. FB_IMG_1531555100588.jpeg FB_IMG_1531555106586.jpeg FB_IMG_1531555123991.jpeg
     

  14. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    Thanks for the pics. I am slowly getting enough courage to try it. What procedure do you use for steaming?
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018

  15. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2015
    Idaho
    That was a large area, so I laid a damp cloth over it then applied a hot clothes iron for 30 seconds. A little ding like that, I'd use something like a soldering iron (or the edge of the clothes iron) and a damp cloth to concentrate the heat, and start with just a few seconds to see how it does. If that wasn't enough, I'd give it a few more seconds, gradually increasing the time each cycle. It may not steam completely out because the fibers are torn, but it should largely fill back in.

    Work slowly! If you go too long and leave a scorch mark, all this will be for nothing.

    A quick rubdown with a quality cleaner/polish after the moisture evaporates fully, and it should look pretty good.

    Use a smooth woven cloth like an old t-shirt folded over and distilled water for best results, and wring out the cloth thoroughly. You want lightly but evenly damp, not dripping.
     

  16. murdude

    murdude Tele-Meister

    Age:
    69
    110
    Jun 16, 2017
    Brantford, Ontario
    I managed to steam much of the dents away. There is still a tiny hole and about a nickel size area that the satin finish has dulled around. Is there anything that will restore that dulled area?
     

  17. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

    Good old fashioned furniture wax should work. Do the whole of the surface , apply lightly and buff well with a soft cloth. The satin finish will be slightly less satin to start with but not dramatically less.
     
    murdude likes this.

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