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Work etiquette(?) advice.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by SixStringSlinger, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Holic

    889
    Apr 20, 2014
    Ontario
    Well that is exactly how "Barney" will someday undo your security. :) For example a fake emergency in the form of a social engineering attack.
     

  2. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Nov 7, 2009
    Kansas City, MO
    "Hit by a bus"

    That's the semi gruesome backup strategy that every single supervisor and manager was required to have in the condo management company I worked for.

    A written plan to cover every eventuality that could be conceived in the event any employee were"Hit by a bus" and took important information to the grave.

    The problem you presented here strikes me as one that would be predictably common in your job. This should never have come to point of asking you to break rules.

    I suggest your supervisor is not qualified to supervise.
     

  3. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    I would go a step further: in a situation where you're routinely dealing with confidential information, you can be terminated for sharing your password, regardless of whether the other person uses it or not.

    Giving others your secure password is a clear violation of company policy. It's that simple.

    The next best option, which really isn't an option, would be to have your supervisor give you written instruction to share your password in an email CC'd to her direct supervisor.

    It's not your problem, it's not your job to fix someone else's problem, and the other person involved has already shown his or her unreliability by mishandling their own password.

    At present, your co-worker and your supervisor have violated company policy. If you give out your secure password, your co-worker, your supervisor and you have violated company policy.

    It's not a difficult decision. Protect yourself.


    "fall, mountains. Just don't fall on me." -J.M. Hendrix


    .
     
    SixStringSlinger likes this.

  4. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    ^ Love it
     
    SixStringSlinger likes this.

  5. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    More like giving access in a critical situation to my co-worker of 7 years sitting right next to me, who needs to log on quickly to fix a bad situation. Some trust should exist when you’re on the same team. If it doesn’t, then that’s a problem that needs to be addressed.
    However, it depends on the specific situation, and since I don’t know anything about the OP’s work environment or policies, I can only guess and offer my opinion... :cool:
     

  6. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    A good point.


    So this co-worker already mishandled his own login information, then "borrowed" someone else's login information, which he also mishandled. And you want to give him yours?!

    This looks like a much bigger problem, all the more reason not to get involved.

    The whole thing stinks to high heaven.


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  7. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Why is a weekends-only third coworker required to change that password? Why couldn't the procrastinator change their own password? That seems to be the crux of it. Sounds like either very poor security design - and in that case, why have any - or more likely the company is trying to save money on a site license. In other words stealing.

    I'd have offered the manager to provide their login, since they thought it was such a great idea. I'd also have notified top brass of the situation, why it's broken, and your disappointment overall.
     

  8. DonM

    DonM Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Age:
    70
    Apr 21, 2016
    Henderson,NV/SLC,UT
    The supervisor should give the employee her login information. Of course, that won't happen.
     

  9. Paul Jenkin

    Paul Jenkin Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Aug 17, 2017
    Essex, UK
    If you did as the supervisor wants and everything went okay, it could become "the norm" and they'd be able to use your previous acquiescence against you to do the same thing again, and again....and you'd have little option, or defence.

    If you did as the supervisor wants and it went to sh*t, there'd probably be multiple job losses - yours, your supervisor's and your co-workers - as you'd all be complicit in a breach of your company's IT security protocols.

    Personally, I don't see any upside for you in this, if you were to accede to your supervisor's request, and I'd resist 100%. The difficulty is whether your supervisor is the sort who'd use make life difficult as a result of you sticking to your guns when saying "no".

    It's not a dilemma I ever want to face but, from what I've read in the original post, the issue is the supervisor's laziness and unwillingness to deal with the situation properly, according to the rules. This seems to be one of those times where the rules are there to protect you.
     
    SixStringSlinger likes this.

  10. KyAnne

    KyAnne Tele-Afflicted

    Don't know if anyone said this but I'd printout the emails confirming this "back and forth" and take them home with me. Hard copy evidence.
     
    beyer160 likes this.

  11. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Tele-Afflicted

    May 21, 2006
    SPace
    To be clear, the coworker my supervisor wants me to share my login with never had their own login for this app. Supposedly it's been in process for a long while (it did take something like 6 months for me to get my own). So this whole time my coworker has been using another coworker's login (this person also works weekends; it used to be every week, now more like once a month). Now, in my opinion, the coworker with the other login should never have allowed it to be shared, but here we are.
     

  12. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Tele-Afflicted

    May 21, 2006
    SPace
    My coworker was given responsibility for this login info. a while back, but since it is (and has always been) under another coworker's name, that coworker is the one who would have to get it unlocked.
     

  13. Freejack

    Freejack Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    61
    Apr 26, 2011
    Nederland, CO
    Yea, as a Unix admin and Jeanne a DBA, no. Beyer160 had the same thought I did from your first post. “It’s a pain but I’ll work in her place while you get her password problem straightened out.” Take one for the team, get OT or overtime, and make the supervisor a little smarter for next time.

    Carl
     
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  14. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    That should have been changed when the coworker took on the responsibility. PITA, but it's what should have happened.

    That aside, none of this would be an issue if the coworker hadn't procrastinated.
     
    Mr Green Genes likes this.

  15. Tonetele

    Tonetele Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2009
    South Australia
    I had quite a few jobs and my Dad's advice was shut up and observe tor the first 6 months.
    Also " Never play where you collect your pay".
     
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  16. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Oct 22, 2006
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    HIPAA violations can result in a $25000 fine for each instance. An incident would have enough hiring the fan to turn the sky brown.

    Nobody has your password except you unless you give it away. Records will only show the user name.

    Creating the new log in is quick and trivial for the person with the access. The difficulty in this case is inexcusable.

    So stand your ground.
     

  17. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    Yup. The guy who had initially given out his login information has been "too busy" to update the information for a while now. Sounds to me like he's wised up and regrets giving it out to begin with.


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  18. bender66

    bender66 Friend of Leo's

    Jan 18, 2010
    on my bike
    When it all goes wrong, & it will, are you protected?

    Been there. It turns into your word against theirs.

    I'd have given them a false password just to get them off my back. After that I can't be reached. They'll get the hint.
     

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