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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Why '74?

Discussion in 'Vintage Tele Discussion Forum (pre-1974)' started by pcasarona, Jun 24, 2015.

  1. xtrajerry

    xtrajerry Doctor of Teleocity

    Back then we all thought heavier guitars sustained better so I don't know if it can be considered a quality issue if Fender was building what the buyers wanted.
     

  2. pcasarona

    pcasarona Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    187
    Mar 27, 2013
    Auburn, AL
    I agree. Weren't Les Paul's known for being extremely heavy as well. Hasn't hurt their values. I remember the talk from the 70's about heavy guitars and sustain.
     

  3. Major Gruber

    Major Gruber Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 24, 2012
    Colombes France
    It's based on supply and demand, based on a diminution of quality of fabrication while increasing the number of guitar produced.

    There are bad 60's number and good 70's ones, but if you get to compare a good 1975 with a good 1965, you'll get everything to understand that supply and demand rules sometimes just make sense.
     

  4. Major Gruber

    Major Gruber Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 24, 2012
    Colombes France
    sorry, forgot the quote

    It's based on supply and demand, based on a diminution of quality of fabrication while increasing the number of guitar produced.

    There are bad 60's number and good 70's ones, but if you get to compare a good 1975 with a good 1965, you'll get everything to understand that supply and demand rules sometimes just make sense.
     

  5. SamClemons

    SamClemons Poster Extraordinaire

    Jan 23, 2011
    Jasper, TN
    There was a place here that charged a premium for heavier guitars not that many years ago. What goes around, comes around. In another 10 years, folks will probably be selling their light guitars and shopping the heavy ones again.
     

  6. Major Gruber

    Major Gruber Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 24, 2012
    Colombes France
    I red somewhere that when Gibson had designed the LP, they relied on their wood stock of Kalamazoo full of old dried light wood. After the warehouse burned, they had to keep the guitar's thickness but couldn't get wood as long dried like the ones they had, so they became heavy.
     

  7. kgguitarplayer

    kgguitarplayer Tele-Meister

    Age:
    26
    440
    Jun 11, 2010
    Nashville
    I have a great playing and sounding 74. There are great examples, and also duds from every era. Most people seem to think there were several duds in the 70s. I wasn't around then so I wouldn't know, but most of the ones I've played have been great. I like to think of mine as vintage even though it may not "technically" be according to this forum
     

  8. Singin' Dave

    Singin' Dave Friend of Leo's

    May 22, 2008
    Chicago
    I get all the conversations about notches and other "good or bad" alterations to original design and specs, but frankly I think that's all just subjective geek talk to try to justify some sort of specific date for a subjective term like "golden era" or "vintage".

    IMO there are varying degrees of Vintage and the term itself is eye of the beholder. Sure a '65 is pricier to buy than a '75 - makes sense as '65's are probably a lot more rare and maybe they were in general as a whole built better. So the '65 vintage is higher valued than the 75 vintage. But I would argue both are "vintage", just that one "vintage" year is more valued than other. Yet both are higher valued right now than their contemporary mass produced peers.

    Check Vintage Guitar buyers guide and tell us if a '75 Telecaster is going for more than a '2015 Am Standard. I would guess it is. Thus, there is something about that "vintage" of telecaster that brings more in the market than does the new equivalent. I would bet that an '82 Fullerton made Tele would do the same. Is that not a vintage guitar? Maybe its just a better guitar, pretty much how "vintage" is defined in Websters as attributed to wine and other things.

    If pre-'74 is this forum's arbitrary definition for "vintage telecaster", I'm totally cool with that. I just think attributing the term to a specific date based on detailed specification characteristics is a little bit of cork sniffery. There we go with the wine again. :)

    Off to go play my MJT partscaster through my "vintage" '75 SFPR - ducks- :)
     

  9. AWG42N43

    AWG42N43 TDPRI Member

    29
    Oct 4, 2014
    FLORIDA
    I had a '72 Tele Deluxe I bought in 1983 and the only thing I can remember about that guitar is that it was a boat anchor and the F tuners were horrible. It was all original and as I recall in very good shape. I don't recall the pickups sounding that great but the vintage craze wasn't a big deal then and I think my amp was a JCM800. If my memory serves me right I paid about $350 for it. White with black guard in the original black case with metal Fender logo. I rarely played it. I also had a 1968 Telecaster that was white on white with maple board. It yellowed out very nicely. THAT guitar I miss.
     

  10. Antoon

    Antoon Tele-Holic

    641
    Feb 10, 2010
    Low Lands
    I remember those pickups were frowned upon at the time because they did not overdrive the amp like gibson humbuckers did. But in hinsight those pickups had their own merits.
     

  11. JKjr

    JKjr Tele-Holic

    800
    Aug 24, 2007
    raleigh nc
    I had a Deluxe back in the day, and played TONS of them...they were $300 guitars all day long. LP's, Strats, and Teles were $350-400. Mine and most of the rest SOUNDED great, but unfortunately the largest percentage (mine included) were slapped together with inferior wood, horrid tuners, and needed fret work right out of the box. I've never seen neck pockets so sloppy or loose...just disgraceful. Then you'd run into one that was magnificent. Naturally that one wasn't for sale!

    I thought the pickups were by far the best part of the guitar,they KILLED the Gibsons of the time. But as Antoon has said, I was in the minority. Amps had much less gain, there were few overdrive pedals, and you'd get thrown out of the bar a long time before you hit the sweet spot on that half stack!!
     

  12. Cookie-boy

    Cookie-boy TDPRI Member

    Age:
    67
    20
    Aug 3, 2009
    UK
    Working in the retail sector of the guitar business in the late 60's through the 70's I understand perfectly why the admin here have designated 1974 as the cut off point. Although this will always cheese off the guys that own later instruments I have to say there is a noticeably different feel between the two eras and as you progress later in the decade this does become more accentuated. Not sure why both Fenders and Gibsons got so damn heavy as the late 70's very early 80's progressed. I had a Les Paul Standard Gold Top that weighed nigh on 13 lbs!!! Great recording guitar but not one to gig with! For both manufacturers I think it was more a case of being less selective about their materials and more concerned with their profits.
     

  13. Dongotto

    Dongotto Tele-Meister

    131
    Feb 5, 2014
    Missouri
    I think 40 years is about the definition of vintage guitars regardless. In 2030 many will call a 1990 telecaster or strat vintage. Especially players from 18 to 50 years old. Us old guys will grumble and say they are not, but it won't matter to the masses what we say. LOL.
     

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