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Who is using Bill Scheltema's neck radius jig???

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by fischkopp, Sep 8, 2009.

  1. fischkopp

    fischkopp TDPRI Member

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    Hi everybody,

    since i am planning my next build (having some sweet exotic neck blanks in my basement...), I am concidering to build Bill Scheltemas Neck jig...

    Does anyboby have a kind of "advise" or video how to use it?

    This seems to be a really cool tool!!!!:cool:

    Thanks from Germany (Well, I'm in France right now...),

    Ole
     
  2. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    No video but here's a pic. Easy to build and use as well.

    DSC00510.jpg
     
  3. Mojotron

    Mojotron Friend of Leo's

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    I surely plan to use it - had to build a few other jigs first.
     
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  5. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    That is not logical .
    :mrgreen:
     
  6. wowazeplin

    wowazeplin TDPRI Member

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    I have... Worked really well, just have to measure (read: check position) many times, cut once..

    My advice is to shape a pine neck first, just to get the feel for the jig.. I added a stop to keep the bit from biting and pulling as I worked the fixture left and right, Bill mentioned that he just radiused both ends first to address that issue..

    My brother in law is now using it...
    [​IMG]

    Check my other pics for results..
     
  7. Mojotron

    Mojotron Friend of Leo's

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    Making a neck is really tough compared to making a body or just about any other guitar part.

    I'm convinced that to get the neck right, you have to build jigs for tuner holes, truss routing, truss access holes... fretting...

    I'll get to this one soon enough and I'll post some pictures. :oops:
     
  8. olaftheholy

    olaftheholy Tele-Afflicted

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    way too much work!
    I'm having an ellips radius bit made....
    i'm the lazy type
     
  9. treadwm

    treadwm Tele-Meister

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    If you don't mind my asking, how much is that going to cost you?
     
  10. tquig

    tquig TDPRI Member

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    And it worked like a dream!! Thanks again, Mike!! (hey- is that a zepplin? :D)
     
  11. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    I got quoted $300 :eek:.
     
  12. jaydawg

    jaydawg Tele-Holic

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    The be honest, using a jig to shape the back of a neck is kind of overkill. The time that it takes to shape a neck by hand is nothing compared to the time involved in building the jig, setting it up, making test cuts, recalibrating, more test cuts then finally running the neck.

    For me, one of the most relaxing and enjoyable parts of guitar building is shaping the neck. Just a spokeshave, cabinet scraper, some sandpaper and your fingertips to tell you what to do.

    Also if you plan on getting better at making neck then using the jig is circumventing some of the important lessons you need to go through in order to get better. I'm not trying to put down anyone who chooses to use a jig like that. Just saying there is a lot to be learned by shaping a neck by hand. And in the end it is faster.
     
  13. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree to some extent... but once you get the jig set up, your necks will all be the same and consistant. It's hard to get consistancy when you do it strictly by hand.
     
  14. jaydawg

    jaydawg Tele-Holic

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    That's just it. They will all be the same. The neck that we are reproducing are not a consistent shape from head to heal. They are soft V's, hard V's, D's and C's. You'll also find that shape change from head to heal. Not something that jig will do. All I'm saying is learning to do it by hand is VERY important is you plan on continuing with guitar making.

    And as far as consistency, you do plan on hand sanding the neck when it comes off the jig right? We all know how consistent those old hand sanded fenders are.

    Please don't misunderstand. I'm not knocking the jig or anyone using it. Just giving another side. Just the fact that so many guys are starting to build neck is very cool. It wasn't always like that around here.
     
  15. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've never used a jig to build a neck. I've had people ask me to build them a guitar with a neck "just like on my (fill in the blank)" and I tell them I can't do it. With a jig you could get pretty damn close... even with the hand sanding added into the mix.
     
  16. jaydawg

    jaydawg Tele-Holic

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    So what part of coping an existing profile do you find undoable? It's really not that difficult. Sure you'll never make a 1:1 clone by hand but a good copy is not that hard.
     
  17. jkingma

    jkingma Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That's exactly my point.

    For some people, close just isn't good enough.
     
  18. Marc Rutters

    Marc Rutters Tele-Afflicted Vendor Member

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    Whatever tools you use your fingertips are #1. CNC to spokeshave and everything in between all must finally pass threw your fingertips. I myself use CNC to rough in a neck because it's available but always do the final shape by hand. Shaping the back of a neck is more like sculpturing and given most are not a straight forward arc hand shaping gives you the freedom achieve your desired shape, C, D, V or whatever. I agree this is relaxing and enjoyable plus it adds to a guitars personality.
     
  19. Meekster

    Meekster TDPRI Member

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    Hello everyone
    I think this is my first post here. :eek:
    anywho I have searched the site using the search feature,
    are there plans for this jig available?
    But I agree jaydawg the best part of the build is the shaping of the neck by hand.
    but if I had a gaint router bit like a handrail bit to remove alot of the bulk I would use that.
     
  20. jaydawg

    jaydawg Tele-Holic

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    Cool! Are you running the machine?

    My day job is as a programmer and operator of a 5'x12' overhead gantry CNC for a custom cabinet shop. When I get home I actually prefer to do it the old fashioned way.
     
  21. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity

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    I think that guitarmaking is the only artform that I can think of where your "art" is compared to a factory made product. All the things that make something handmade,( tool marks, irregularities, etc) are considered negatives by people nowadays who are looking for an exact copy of a factory made product. I agree with both sides. It's important to learn how to make a neck and it takes a few necks to get the hang of it. A copying device would be handy to duplicate your ultimate neck. I find a rasp more controllable than a spokeshave too. YMMV.
     
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