White rice vs brown rice.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Larry F, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    White rice is like wonder bread to me, and it gets a hard pass
     
  2. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    Spanish rice for me please.
     
  3. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    I lived for 7 years in Asia and have been to all but four of the countries there. Never ate or even saw brown rice one time. My ex-wife (Japanese) had a two word description for it: Pig food.
    While I'm not THAT averse to it, I certainly don't see the appeal and absolutely not in sushi where it seems to appear often in America. The texture is so completely wrong there I can't even begin.

    There are some tasty rice variants out there. In Japan, rice is often mixed with a small amount of barley which adds a little texture and nuttiness. Wild rice can be lovely.
    As for the nutrients in grain products, come on. Compare green veg or most root veg to any grain product ounce for ounce and see where you land. Even the most hippy sprouted bread is empty calories by comparison.
     
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  4. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    That newly retired thing is a big adjustment. Used to years one or both working out of the house where you could each plan your own thing, now both are stuck all day under one roof checking out each other's bad habits.

    Mix half and half of both rice types.

    .
     
  5. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    My relatives from Scotland would not eat Corn on the cob because that was animal fodder
     
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  6. raito

    raito Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    A thousand years ago in Japan, more or less, city people had various maladies and would be prescribed a vacation in the country. Why? Too much processed food. Like white rice. In the country, you ate it as it was harvested, more or less.

    Plus ca change, man!
     
  7. stxrus

    stxrus Friend of Leo's

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    I love all kinds of rice. It’s a food that lends itself to a myriad of flavorings.
     
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  8. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    Are you getting brown rice and wild rice mixed up?

    Wild rice isn't actually rice.
     
  9. Nickadermis

    Nickadermis Friend of Leo's

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    No, but I can’t have it either :)
     
  10. Obsessed

    Obsessed Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    White rice has a higher glycemic value than brown rice. I love both, but I know that brown rice is much better for you, so I never cook with white rice. I just cooked a batch of jambalaya with my usual brown rice and no one ever complains.
     
  11. Count

    Count Friend of Leo's

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    Being pre diabetic we were warned off white rice for reglar eating, our pancreases can cope with it occasionally but not every day. Brown Rice takes longer to cook and is improved by soaking before cooking. I like to add a few cashews to it while it is cooking and some saffron or turmeric. Black Rice is a nice rice and slightly sticky, looks a bit weird though on the dinner plate.
     
  12. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

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    In Japan nowadays, you can easily buy brown rice (genmai) in bulk, and get it polished to whatever degree of whiteness you like, at the shop while you wait. My wife often does this.
     
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  13. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    If you do a little research on the topic, you'll learn that brown rice has more arsenic than white rice ... and the wheat germ contains proven carcinogens that are largely absent from white flour.

    I'm a Hippy-Dippy semi-vegitarian, but just because something is "brown" or less processed doesn't make it healthier. Also, not everyone is at risk for pre-diabetes type 2. Some of us are slender, active, and not predisposed to insulin resistance. Food advice should be tailored to an individual ... one size doesn't fit all.
     
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  14. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Tele-Afflicted

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    One other consideration for those of us who are beginning to feel our age - white rice can tend to be binding, whereas brown rice helps keep things moving along.

    I like both myself, and especially I love wild rice.

    BTW wild rice is not a member of the rice family, though they both fall under the general heading of flowering grasses. https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-wild-rice.htm

    As for arsenic, it can be significantly reduced by using extra water when you cook it. Simply using five parts water (instead of two) to one part rice has been shown to reduce levels by 53%. Soaking the rice overnight before cooking can reduce it even more, but also reduces several important nutrients.

    According to my doctors even the increased modern amounts don't constitute any appreciable health hazard unless you're consuming large amounts of rice on a daily basis.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  15. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    All food comes with risks. If I wanted to assess those risks, I'd research pertinent studies rather than depend on the scientific knowledge of a medical doctor ... who is trained to diagnose and treat injuries and illnesses, not do research and experiments ... there's no way to be current on all the latest details regarding food and environmental toxins and cancer causing agents. Maybe your doctor is particularly interested in the subject. I have several friends who are physicians and nurses. They are very talented and well respected, but only experts in any field of research are actually current on the latest studies.
    Anyway, I don't advocate generalities like "brown" food, organic food, raw food, unprocessed food, farmer's market produce ... is the most healthful. It often is, but if you really want to understand the subject, you need to do your own research.
     
  16. eclecticsynergy

    eclecticsynergy Tele-Afflicted

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    One of the docs in question is a naturopath; I trust his opinions on nutrition & food issues more than I would those of a random MD at large.

    But I absolutely concur that it's always wise to do your own research. Especially regarding comments you might read on an online discussion forum.
     
  17. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    With the internet, it is so easy to find reputable sources of knowledge. I remember when consulting scientific and medical periodicals at the library was the best a layman could do to learn about state of the art health and medical knowledge. Just do due diligence and be your own advocate.
     
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  18. Lake Placid Blue

    Lake Placid Blue Poster Extraordinaire

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    My ancestors came to the States from Japan at the turn of the last century. We grew up eating medium grain white rice with breakfast lunch and dinner. Breakfast was usually bacon eggs waffles or pancakes with rice. Lunch was sandwiches and rice. Dinner was a full plate of rice with the main course and side dishes piled on top. I ate two servings of dinner every night until just a few years ago. My grandfather was an amateur Sumo wrestler. His ancestors were Sumo wrestlers. The eating habits have only recently changed. I’m down to 1 cup of rice at dinner. None for breakfast or lunch. The only time I eat long grain white rice is at Panda Express. The only time I eat brown rice is at Chipotle. I think everyone should eat what works best for them. I’m happy and healthy.
     
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  19. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

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    If I'm not wrong, some studies show Japan at low incidences of heart disease, high frequency of stomach cancer. I think smoking plays into this, and I can't remember if the studies correct for that, but I wouldn't be surprised to find that arsenic (and also talc, by the way) is playing a role in the cancer rates there.
     
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  20. Boubou

    Boubou Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    Slowly backing away, trying not to be noticed, heading for the bacon thread.
     
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