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what's the right wood putty/filler?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by hardie775, May 27, 2009.

  1. hardie775

    hardie775 Tele-Meister

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    Hey Friends,
    So i've stripped this Strat Plus body down and am expecting some products to paint and finish this rebuild from Guitar ReRanch. one of the products is a grain filler, which i've never used before, but i don't expect it to work as a substatial filler for these craters.
    I've recently learned that in the 90's Fender used a veneer and my paint stripper got a little too hot a couple of times. What do you think would be the best filler for this application.
    From ReRanch i'm getting the oil based grain filler. i've got sanding sealer, then the laquor based primer, the aerosal paint and the nitro finishing coat.
    So what's going to stick the best to this alder under these layers of finish?
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  2. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Let me begin by saying that I am not much of a traditionalist.

    Are you planning on a solid finish?

    If so you might get yourself a quart can of BONDO, the auto body filler.

    Put it on thin.

    Level it with a sanding block.

    But like I said, I am not much for tradition.

    Good luck and keep us informed.
     
  3. JohnPurdy

    JohnPurdy Tele-Meister

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    Bondo unless you want to sand a lot more then you could use epoxy.
     
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  5. tcarp

    tcarp Tele-Holic

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    Bondo is a good choice. Just be careful to use the right ratio of accelerant to the product...otherwise you might get shrinkage.

    Also, feather all the edges of the area you want to fill so that there is a smooth transition between the mud and the higher unaffected areas.

    Tom
     
  6. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    Bondo is ok but it's alot harder to sand than wood so you can end up damaging the wood around the repair. I've used this from Minwax, alot lighter, sands easier and doesn't shrink.

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  7. tcarp

    tcarp Tele-Holic

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    No compatibility issues with nitro?

    Tom
     
  8. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

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    I haven't had any problems. It smells just like bondo, very similar but it's made for wood where bondo is more for metal.
     
  9. Declan012

    Declan012 TDPRI Member

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    What could we use to fill screw holes? Then rescrew the screws...i have a guitar and someone has done some piss poor screwing on it..some screws don't even fit anymore (Wood fillers in the uk)
     
  10. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    The right sized wood dowel for the hole you want to fill, from any diy shop, and some wood glue. Cut dowel off as flush, sand flat.

    Wooden golf tees are a good alternative....

    Smaller holes (PG holes, for example) can be done with wooden toothpicks or matchsticks + wood glue
     
  11. Declan012

    Declan012 TDPRI Member

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    It's not quite that simple, theyve drilled holes so close together, they've become odd shaped worn out screw holes, They really have done a piss poor job....
     
  12. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

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    In that case you have to drill a hole that encompasses the screw holes and fill that with a wood dowel. If you are not familiar with the procedure perhaps you know a woodworker who can do it for you.
     
  13. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

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    Bondo and Minwax High Performance Wood Filer are both polyester resins, like what you'd use to repair fiberglass, with a filler like wood flour (fine sawdust) mixed in. Either one of them will work nicely, won't shrink back too much when they cure, and might be able to give you an invisible repair. Be warned, that the line at the edge of the repair might print through as your topcoat cures, so try to feather it out past the divot if you can.

    Grain filler is a much finer or thinner product meant for filling the tiny pores in open woods like mahogany, it will not be suitable for patching a defect in your veneer.

    It also appears from your photo that you have some areas of veneer that have bubbled, you'll need to slit those with a fine blade and inject some glue underneath (a small artist's spatula works for this) and then press it down with a block and a piece of waxed paper until it dries flat again.
     
  14. Declan012

    Declan012 TDPRI Member

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    Barbrainy...will i need a wood glue then? Or is any ok?
     
  15. bob1234

    bob1234 Tele-Afflicted

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    Any catalyzed resin will work great for this... so +1 again for the bondo.

    for the holes ,barbrainy has the right idea. No special wood glues needed. Titebond will work great. Just make sure you get a HARDWOOD dowel (maple, oak, etc), not a hobbyist dowel (aka basswood or poplar) or you will be back to square one.
     
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