What kind of music education did you have growing up?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Flat6Driver, May 26, 2019.

  1. Flat6Driver

    Flat6Driver Friend of Leo's

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    Every good boy does fine and all that ...

    I was playing at church today and got me thinking. I grew up in a good school system and we had basic music education. So I knew about the staff, beats in a measure and such. We had recorders, and i took a little (very little) violin...not sure when/why I quit it.

    I had a Casio keyboard at 13 and some basic song books. I've was ok with picking out melody in a song on that keyboard. I can't really read music so I can't aight read for guitar. I play chords from the beats in the measures.

    I ask this, because in the theory section, I see discussions where experienced people explain things like keeping time and essentially defining the term "melody". Guitar seems to be one of the few instruments people pick up with out a music education. I guess Tuba isn't as popular.

    What kind of music ed did you have?
     
  2. Toadtele

    Toadtele Tele-Holic

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    Not much as a child really. Wasn’t much offered through my local public schooling. My grandma got me lessons with a local pompous long hair with a wicked black Kramer. That guitar was the best part of that experience. As an adult I’ve wisely sought out education from more distinguished academics. And just as notably a few backwoods hicks. I’m greatfull for it all. Always looking for my next lesson.
     
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  3. LoveHz

    LoveHz Tele-Holic

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    Lonnie Donegan records.
     
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  4. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    My Mother enrolled me in piano lessons when I was 7 years old. She made every child take lessons for at least 1 year before they could decide to continue or not. To get to my instructor I had to pass a boxing gym which was far more interesting to me at that age. I went to piano for about 4 months and signed up for boxing lessons for the other 6 months before my plot was discovered due to a black eye. I never went back to the piano, but did take boxing lessons for the next 3 years. I seemed to have a natural knack for boxing which I sure didn't have for the piano, but as I grew older so did my nose. You can't become a great boxer with a nose like Jimmy Durante, so I had to find another hobby.

    I wish I had stuck to the piano actually now, but a 7 year old doesn't come equipped with hindsight.
     
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  5. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I started playing the Recorder in primary school.. we used them in a marching band with drums as well...

    it sucked... I could play some tunes/national anthem, etc.... but my thoughts were always towards the small group of guys drumming....

    I eventually found an opportunity to get in the drum corps a year earlier than usual...

    I became a side drummer for the rest of primary school, teaching younger guys as they came through as the older guys did for me...
    Then through highschool I was in the Boys Brigade at a local church and they had a Bugle/drums marching band, I was straight into that and played at many parades and services through my teen years....

    that experience gave me a metronome in my head that keeps me on the beat like clockwork.... :)
     
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  6. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    School choir in elementary school.
    Great guitar lessons from Drew Thomason between my ages of 10-13.
    He taught me how to fingerpick, and transpose chords.
    Very helpful.
     
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  7. VWAmTele

    VWAmTele Friend of Leo's

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  8. GibbyTwin

    GibbyTwin Tele-Meister

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    None early on. My first eight years of schooling were in a parochial school system. There was no music curriculum. I didn't have any music classes till I started public high school and by that time I was already banging out chords on the Harmony flat top trying to learn the latest Beatles, Stones, Herman's Hermits, Kinks, whatever was on the radio then. Learned some finger picking from Laura Weber's Folk Guitar PBS show. Any 'formal' training I ever had was taken when I was much older going to college at night (mostly free electives outside the major). I did take a few theory classes at Eddie Simon's in NYC in the early 80s. That's about it. I'm mostly self taught.
     
  9. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Lower elementary school, Mr Waurschauer was a Dustin Hoffman doppleganger. He taught us to listen to the final chord of "Day in the Life" as it faded away. And he taught us the importance of having a skill, he claimed being able to type kept him from seeing combat in wartime.

    He was one (of the few) good ones
     
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  10. Buckaroo

    Buckaroo TDPRI Member

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    Initially, at age 11, I had Mel Bay books (there were two commonly available editions back then) and a pitch pipe. Eventually, guitar lessons from local teacher.

    I learned the most playing with other musicians who were better than me. Starting in church bands at the age of 13. Then paying country gigs at age 14.

    Over the years I have taken more private lessons, but mostly I learn from other musicians that I gig with. The things I learn from them are the things that I can use over and over again.
     
  11. JL_LI

    JL_LI Friend of Leo's

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    I started with tuba in 4th grade and played through my freshman year in college. I taught myself trombone when my younger brother brought one home from school. I wanted to play that Tower of Strength riff. My father bought a guitar for me in 7th grade. I bought books and taught myself. I was good enough at trombone by 10th grade to play 3rd trombone in orchestra when there was no tuba part. Marching band needed a utility player who could fit in anywhere as a replacement. It was a natural to play baritone horn for that. I learned jazz chords well enough to play guitar in stage band in high school. I also played guitar accompaniment for varsity chorus. I played whatever was needed in brass choir. This took up a lot of time and maybe I could have done better with math and science with more time to study. I didn’t play brass instruments beyond my freshman year in college. By that time the demands of science and math and the need to make a little money gigging on bass and guitar made college band and orchestra impossible. I had some great experiences in school music. My high school orchestra played a full concert at Expo 67 in Montreal. Freshman year in college I made it to the Villanova Intercollegiate Jazz Festival as part of a quartet on double bass. It’s just a big upright guitar, right. I’ll retire next year at 70 after a career in bio and laser engineering. I made the right choice in pursuing STEM before there was such a thing but I’m enjoying my music still.
     
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  12. Hatfield92

    Hatfield92 Tele-Meister

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    I was in marching/concert band from age 12. I was a drummer. So I can read basic rhythms reasonably well to this day. Melody requires a little effort. That background has also given me a leg up when it comes to rhythm.

    As far as guitar instruction, I received a couple of months worth of lessons at the very beginning of my journey, a couple of years after I began drumming. The guitar instructor was not especially formally trained himself. Couldn’t read music, but taught me about charts.

    Beyond my rhythmic training, I’d say I’m at least 80% self taught. I feel like I have a pretty good grasp of simple to intermediate theory, although I probably couldn’t always explain it to you in formal terms.
     
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  13. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    same here, drum music was on one line only, no rise and fall of dots like in regular music..

    I can read off music rhythm beat structures but have no real melody experience...

    I never did get behind a kit and learn that style of drumming, times I've tried felt awkward....

    during highschool a few of my friends had guitars, two of them.... we taught eachother chords/songs as best we could.

    .. I stayed with guitars since.... a bit hard to take a set of drums in the car to go surfing.... :lol:
     
  14. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    the guitar education- Around 12 years old, I took lessons from the county dog catcher. His name was Ira and I'm guessing he was in his late 60s. He told me right off the bat he wouldn't teach me any rock n roll.

    He had a foster daughter who he'd ended up hooking up with. In retrospect, I suppose that must have happened already, when I started taking guitar lessons from him. There was a closeness between them I found uncomfortable. I'm guessing she was maybe 17.

    He wore square toed engineer boots, and when he removed them you could see his toes had grown into them, they were squared-off also (he didn't wear socks).

    At one point he wanted me to join his band which was him and his foster daughter/girlfriend, but my mom wouldn't allow it.

    Later on I heard about how his foster daughter/girlfriend had taken up with some guy closer to her age, and my guitar teacher went and shot him. He subsequently died in a shoot out with the cops.

    All true.

    Also, he had a telecaster with a mandolin built into it. I don't recall whether or not the mandolin was detachable, but I'm quite sure it was a Fender instrument
     
  15. Beachbum

    Beachbum Friend of Leo's

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    As a teen in the 60's it was this.
    [​IMG]

    Later on it was this.
    [​IMG]

    And of course there was my ear and my Dads turntable.
     
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  16. Steve 78

    Steve 78 Tele-Afflicted

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    I did piano lessons when I was 7 for 6 months. Hated it, gave up.

    I learned the recorder from about age 8 - 11. I mean, everyone at school learned recorder but I was one of the group of nerds that gave up Wednesday lunchtimes to take focused lessons. I got pretty good, I could sight read, etc. When I moved to high school I tried clarinet instead as a step up. 1.5 years. Hated it, gave up.

    When I was 15 I started playing electric guitar. Never had lessons. Have since forgotten how to sight read. It would be nice to take lessons, but time is scarce.
     
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  17. jimilee

    jimilee Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Marching band all through school, 2 years of blue grass guitar lessons.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  18. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I have an older uncle who is a child prodigy on piano.....perfect pitch and all. My mother probably wished I would inherit his abilities, and so I started piano lessons at about age three. We also had a terrific choir program at our church, so I started in the Cherub Choir about the same time. I continued piano until age nine, when I started violin. At that time public schools in Ft Worth had excellent music programs in the classes, as well as extracurricular orchestra and band organizations. At one brief point, I was taking lessons in violin, piano and cornet simultaneously. In Jr High I began studying violin with the violin professor at TCU, who was also Concert Master with FWSO. All of this gave me a strong background in music theory and ear training fundamentals...."Formal" music training.
    Then....what music historian Martin Mull refers to as the "Great American Folk Music Scare of the early sixties" hit......Peter, Paul and Mary, Kingston Trio, The Weavers, and MANY other folk groups distracted me, and diverted my attentions to guitar. Although I learned to play guitar by ear, I brought many techniques from the violin. Then in 1963 I first heard The Beatles on record, and I was totally seduced by the British Invasion......pretty much forsook classical music until college....and, although i continued in church choir, I fell down the rabbit hole of Rock N Roll. When I got to college as a Music Major, I found my "learning and playing" by ear actually gave me an advantage over other students that could only play by the written notes. But, as I've mentioned several times, without the support and encouragement of my parents, none of this would have been possible. While my mother has NEVER said a word about this, I probably broke her heart when I gave up classical violin.....:(
     
  19. Les H

    Les H Tele-Meister

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    I had an awesome older woman who was the elementary/Jr high music instructor. Her forte was piano of course and she could teach you Mozart but she knew a little about guitar. Even though she didn't know a lot about actually playing guitar, without her help I don't know if I would have even learned to tune a guitar as my family was very non musical.

    Even though I went on to study theory in college I owe it all to her- guitar, piano, and vocal coaching. She is the kind of teacher that is so sorely missed in today's education system.
     
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  20. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    for guitar, we bought single song sheet music with the chord blocks along the top... CCR was easy .

    another friend had the Beatles complete book, the piano/organ version... man, some of the crazy chords along the top of that were awkward...:rolleyes:

    back in the 90's I bought the beatles complete guitar version.... and the keys/chords were much easier.. cowboy chords mainly....

    what!!?? that's not how the chords looked in the old book...:lol:
     
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