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What car has the quietest cabin/least road noise?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by DrPepper, Mar 12, 2018.

  1. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

    Jun 21, 2011
    Bakersfield
    Actually, according to consumer reports the Chevy Impala is one the best picks for a large sedan. I would agree with that because I bought my wife a new 2006 Chevy Impala LTZ that we still have. It has all the bells and whistles and has less than 60,000 miles on it right now. It's riding on Michelins and is very quiet. I drive a little Honda CRV and am always impressed with the quietness of the Impala when I drive it. The CRV sits on Michelins too, and is not noisy by any means, but the Impala is very quiet. One time when we first got the car, I was heading over to Palmdale and was driving the wife's car. She said, uh bubba do you realize you're doing a hundred miles an hours. I truthfully didn't. I'm not one to drive fast other than to try something out. It just handles and drives so well, the speed got away from me without knowing it. I immediately slowed down.

    I haven't pushed the car passed a hundred, I wonder if it doesn't have a cut off on it, because most cars will only run about 98 before they start warbling. I had a Mazda extra cab pickup one time with a super duper engine in it that would do 135, I know it didn't have a shut off. That was on a completely deserted good road, where a fellow in a new Chevy pickup lost a bet in the quarter mile, and top speed to a guy driving a "little tin can." I still maintain, I don't regularly speed because these incidences were very far apart.
     
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  2. Wrong-Note Rod

    Wrong-Note Rod Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Mar 4, 2009
    atlanta

    my dads got an older Avalon and its VERY quiet inside. I'm jealous as hell of it but he'll never sell. I listen to music most often in a car - thats the perfect listening environment, even at high speeds on the highway!
     

  3. NJ Deadhead

    NJ Deadhead Tele-Meister

    Age:
    36
    218
    Jan 25, 2017
    Greenville, SC
    Nope, I sure didn't... https://www.usatoday.com/story/mone...vey-top-made--usa-cars-toyota-honda/86510052/

    THE MOST POPULAR AMERICAN cars are Toyota and Honda. Sure, they were designed overseas, but they are manufactured in the USA with American labor and at least 75% American parts, usually more.
     

  4. Minimalist518

    Minimalist518 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    55
    Mar 5, 2017
    Albany
    NOT a 2007 Toyota RAV4. That’s what I drive and I get a lot of road noise in the cabin.
    My wife has had a couple Toyota Avalons and they are super quiet. She had an ‘08 and that one was a dressed down Lexus with a Toyota badge. Now she’s driving a ‘10 and it’s a dressed up Camry. She liked the ‘08 better because it was bigger, but in her heart-of-hearts she wants a big, old school Cadie or Lincoln like the Italian girl she is
     

  5. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

     
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  6. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    Not so fast, about where some of the foreign label cars were designed. This can be rescinded from time to time, but normally the North American Operations of, for example, most of these Japanese brands might be done in Los Angeles, or elsewhere in the USA (Texas). The product lines in other countries/markets are often smaller, narrower, may use a lot of diesels, manual transmissions, may be much less SUV-Centric and so they often let the USA wing of the corporation do the design development for USA and Canada sales - with some kind of supervision from Tokyo or whatever.

    Sometimes there's parallel vehicle development and the constraints that go with that. The USA designers of Toyota models still have to integrate to criteria that may be dictated by the parameters of the Lexus product line. Some vehicles share common platforms with models that are close to Universal (most or all world markets). And I predict in the future, that vehicles in all markets will evolve in the direction demanded by the consumers in the Chinese Vehicle Market. They will be the big dogs. We could soon see cars with all kinds of labels, being marketed and sold in the USA, where the original decision making was about making the product most appealing not to Americans, but to the burgeoning Chinese Middle Class.

    But I reject your choice of terms, to describe Toyotas and Hondas, etc. The Big Boys are in Japan, and so Toyota will for example always be a Japanese company whether 50% of their production is in Japan, 50% of the production is in North America or (are you ready?) whether 50% of their production is in China. Are you saying a Toyota will be Chinese if there's enough of the pieces parts coming from there, assembled there; sold there? IMO, words stop meaning anything when you do that.
     

  7. NJ Deadhead

    NJ Deadhead Tele-Meister

    Age:
    36
    218
    Jan 25, 2017
    Greenville, SC
    I think I can change your mind quite quickly...According to your logic, a Squire would be an American guitar. Is it? Nope, it's either Chinese, Indonesian, etc. Designed by Fender America, but NOT American.

    Saying that a Squire that was built in China, with Chinese parts and Chinese labor is Chinese is a fact. Just like saying a Toyota that was built in the USA, by Americans, with American parts is American. Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I rest my case! ;)
     

  8. David Barnett

    David Barnett Poster Extraordinaire


  9. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    Without looking to argue, I'd be interested to know what 75% of the parts in these American made Hondas and Toyotas are also US made.

    Well, you said "at least 75% American parts", not US parts, so maybe the info source is including Mexico as being in America?
    I'd be surprised and interested to learn that the US is manufacturing major car parts (amounting to 75% of a car) for Japanese car companies, when US car companies can't afford to manufacture their own car parts in the US.

    Maybe the 75% is calculated by cubic feet of body parts?

     
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  10. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2014
    UK
    “In space, no one can hear your tires scream”
     
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  11. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    WRT older luxury cars being quiet but cheap, one thing that wears out (and falls off) is all the multi layers of rubber seals around windows and doors.
    A 15yo vehicle might still be tight but by 20 they are all pretty leaky, and the quiet goes away.
     
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  12. Milspec

    Milspec Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 15, 2016
    Nebraska
    Maybe, but door seals are cheap to replace. Right now, my business trucks are a '99, 2005. and even a '74 Power Wagon. Personal vehicles are a Lincoln Continental ('85) and a police Crown Vic (99). None of them have bad door or window seals except for the Power Wagon with bad window sweeps. My '84 Monte Carlo SS was a different story...that thing had bad seals when it rolled off the assembly line, but I still miss it.
     
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  13. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    Ladies and Gentlemen, you just lost your case! :^)

    Squier is a Contract guitar product. Made in probably a half dozen places. By a corporation that's based in America, along lines created in America.

    I've had 39 or 40 Squiers and not a single one was made in China. You just restated the position you took in the previous post and we already dismantled it once.
     

  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    The body on frame construction of your Lincoln and Crown Vic delays the process, but as cars age, parts stop aligning so cleanly with one another and the whole contraption sags and flexes, etc. Which makes even new seals work double overtime. These seals, that maybe could keep a Crown Vic with 20,000 miles on it quiet, are not match for a structure that goosey loose. Better than nothing, for sure, but older cars just become noisy with years and with miles. I think.

    I remember a comprehensive test of a big Mercedes a number of decades ago, and the car had 850,000 miles on it. It looked all right, but even with fresh bushes and shocks, etc., it didn't handle crisply at all. It was noisy. Had it been a Mitsubishi the last crumbs would've been swept up and thrown away at 500,000, so it clearly outperformed that, but these high mileage buggies are proud ex prize fighters who might still be able to take a punch, but their moments of real grace are long behind them.
     

  15. Fenderflame

    Fenderflame Tele-Holic

    584
    Aug 2, 2013
    Mid Sussex, UK
    One of my Dad's friends used to say that when you are driving a Rolls Royce, the only thing you can hear is your beard growing...
     
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  16. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    Ha ha yeah we can replace all the seals but in the power wagon I doubt anyone could hear the wind over their own teeth rattling!
    At least the 4wd manual transmission.

    I'm thinking the OP is looking for a turn key vehicle under $10k, and might not be interested in doing that kind of service.
    But yeah, my '56 Chevy has new door and window seals on the loooooong list.
     
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  17. warrent

    warrent Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Sep 15, 2009
    toronto
    Last year the most "American" car was a KIA
    83% by dollar value. Here's the list
    https://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/documents/2017_aala_percent_year.pdf
     

  18. Milspec

    Milspec Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 15, 2016
    Nebraska
    A "Kia" is now...it was Volkswagen at one time as the most American made product. Actually, some of those Kia's aren't that bad.
     

  19. reactor99

    reactor99 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    48
    9
    Jan 1, 2017
    Georgia, USA
    Buicks are worth considering also. My family has had several from the years OP is thinking of, and all were/are quiet, comfortable, and reliable
     

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